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Compulsory National Service in Poland


angel 14 | 86  
14 Jan 2008 /  #1
is national service compulsory in poland?
osiol 55 | 3,922  
14 Jan 2008 /  #2
I believe some sort of national service is compulsory. My flatmate has to go back before September or, he says, risk prison. He's signed up to go to college or something. Whether that's a delaying tactic or a get-out, I'm not sure. It sounds better than his last idea of going back to become a policeman. He told me this idea and I just laughed and laughed and laughed. When he said about being a student, I just giggled slightly.

Let's have a short, serious answer.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163  
14 Jan 2008 /  #3
Yes... but only 9 months now.
OP angel 14 | 86  
14 Jan 2008 /  #4
i didnt know this-so after school you have to do this-age 18? how long did it use to beif it is only 9 months now 1-2years?
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
14 Jan 2008 /  #5
it was 2 years (even 3 in Navy), but the rules were quite liberal (after the communism fell), so many people never got drafted. Besides, school was a reason for not going to the army, you finished your high school (liceum) at the age of 19 yrs, then passed the exams to a university and as long as you were studying you were free. Before 1989 there were some military classes for university students (and probably even field training), but they dropped it as well (I started my studies in 1989, and we didn't have those classes). And I was never drafted, without any tricks (so common earlier, before 1989, people were obtaining false medical certifications of diseases/illnesses that made them formally unable to serve in the army). They simply didn't need me, I guess it was a little different with technical students (especially modern technologies, telecomunications, medicine etc.), they were probably more likely to get drafted even during the 90's or they still are.

Polish Army had reduced its size significantly after the fall of the Iron Curtain, so every year they neeeded less and less conscripts.
polishcanuck 7 | 462  
14 Jan 2008 /  #6
If you haven't served before the age of 27, you're exempt from military service, right?

I may be going to poland to work before that age and i don't want to get conscripted (if canada had mandatory military service i would have gladly served though).
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
14 Jan 2008 /  #7
Krzysztof

This is how it looked before 1989:

Every male had to go to the military commission at the age of 18. They took personal info, performed basic medical exam and asked questions. All with the interviewed person standing naked in front of the "commission".

Any males who did not get into a university, or were inveligible to get to it got drafted for 2 to 3 years, depending on the formation. Physical conditions and "knowing the right persons" helped in avoiding the service.

All university students, inlcuding women, had to attend military classes. One full day each week. We used to say that guys were trained how to kill, while gals were trained how to treat those who only got wounded, i.e. girls were educatad in medical care, mostly one that would be useful on a battle field. Both grups had some propaganda subjects aimed at building morale and such.

After graduation girls were free and clear (there were some provisions for medical students thouth), while males were suppossed to go to active duty for one year. They were granted the rank of Warrant Officer 4th Class to start with, and by the end of the duty they received the ranks ranging from Second Lieutenant to Lieutenant (rare) and Captain (extremely rare).

Educational background was considered in regards to the formation to which men were assigned. Many of Western European languages students were assigned to radio operations, intelligence, internal security, border control and similar.

It should be also noted that all Poles at the secondary level were also taught military and basic medical skills. The subject was called "przysposobienie obronne" (defense preparedness?) and included some theory and some weapons practice. Most schools were equipped with a small armory.

If you haven't served before the age of 27, you're exempt from military service, right?

I think it was 29 but make absolutely sure and call the consulate. I would not depend on info posted by someone youu are not sure about. Unless of course you don't mind tinkering with guns ;)
telefonitika  
15 Jan 2008 /  #8
TAKEN FROM GOOD OLD WIKIPEDIA:

Poland

Poland has a compulsory service term of nine months for all mature men (three months for those with higher education). However, many of them are considered unfit for mandatory military service during peacetime. Effectively, many tens of thousands of men are drafted each autumn. Alternative service can be requested, e.g. in the police force. This is only valid if you are not attending an educational facility. Students born in 1983 or later can volunteer for military preparations, so they can serve in the military for 6 weeks during their summer break after they finish fourth semester. After joining the European Union, many young men moved abroad in order to avoid the draft and the quite low conditions within the Polish Army. Also many, facing very high unemployment in the country, join the forces voluntarily to serve the term and later gain opportunities to get well paid jobs within the military or police. In the autumn of 2006, the Polish parliament decided to phase out the draft by 2010 and make the Polish army an all-volunteer army.
isthatu 3 | 1,164  
15 Jan 2008 /  #9
All with the interviewed person standing naked in front of the "commission".

I have that nightmare every night before I go for a new job!!!!!

It should be also noted that all Poles at the secondary level were also taught military and basic medical skills. The subject was called "przysposobienie obronne" (defense preparedness?) and included some theory and some weapons practice. Most schools were equipped with a small armory.

I take it some schools still have these facilities,if not used in excactly the same way,in 03 or 04 with collage we met some high school kids who said something about having a shooting range under the school where they shot kalasnikovs...have to admit I thought they were pulling my chain at the time......

oh,in the west,school kids had civil defence as well. In the 80s we were taught; You will hear a siren,you will have four minutes to live.

Earlier generations were taught in more detail; If you hear the siren,duck under the desk and cover your head.
Looks like we were preparing for two different scenarios,Us,nuclear anhialation,you guys,some sort of uprising mkII.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
15 Jan 2008 /  #10
All with the interviewed person standing naked in front of the "commission".

How do I apply for the job as Interviewer ;-)
noimmigration  
15 Jan 2008 /  #11
If you haven't served before the age of 27, you're exempt from military service, right?

your canadian not polish so you have nothing to worry about. its not like the poles have ever done a lot of fighting in history anyway
Michal - | 1,865  
15 Jan 2008 /  #12
Yes, National service was compulsory for two years in Poland unless you joined the navy and for some reason-it was three years! This is why we have so many young unemployed and unemployable Polish people who have not got into university. They come to England to escape National Service. A lot of the Polish 'softies' got out of doing their national Service all together as they went to their doctors and gave a bribe. They got letters stating that they were medically unfit for National Service. How they are fit to work double shifts on building sites in the U.K. is beyond me.

I also do not totally agree with the comment above. The poles have tried to do their bit in military history but I can never understand why the Poles did not sit tight and wait for the Russian Red Army to free Warsaw. After all, they had sat on their laurels for the last five years! I think the Poles thought that by showing their strength, Stalin would grant them independence after the war. Obviously Joseph was not such a silly man and did not give in to them!
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
15 Jan 2008 /  #13
I take it some schools still have these facilities,if not used in excactly the same way,in 03 or 04 with collage we met some high school kids who said something about having a shooting range under the school where they shot kalasnikovs...have to admit I thought they were pulling my chain at the time......

No idea if they still have those, but yes, the kalashnikovs were the main weapons, as well as some native machine guns and handguns.

My secondary school had no shooting range so we had to to the local sports club where they had one. It was a 30 minute walk, and we walked there with AK-47's and PM-63's hanging from our shoulders in bright day. The teacher said his car was too small to carry all those guns for us. Just to be on a safe side we were not issued any ammunition untill were were under strict supervision. One time someone saw 5 teenagers armed to their teeth, and called the cops. The teacher was in deep sh.it for that.

At the university some of the classes took place in barracks, military academies and special military training installation. The teachers were professional officers, and they made sure we took the subject seriously inspite of our initial enthusiasm for military humor.

your canadian not polish so you have nothing to worry about.

If he holds Polish citizenship then in Poland he is not Canadian at all.

I can never understand why the Poles did not sit tight and wait for the Russian Red Army to free Warsaw.

That only means that you have no understading of Polish spirit (and I don't mean the rektifikowany one)

After all, they had sat on their laurels for the last five years!

That means you have no fvcking clue about Poland's history during WW2.
Michal - | 1,865  
15 Jan 2008 /  #14
hat means you have no fvcking clue about Poland's history during WW2.

You are just rude and vulgar and I am not attempting to answer this at all.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
15 Jan 2008 /  #15
There are many exceptions to admission: ill physically or mentally, have a criminal record (even then, not so clear), have repeated classes in primary school more than twice, unfinished primary school, if u don't have Polish citizenship, if u don't have a permanent or temporary address, if u have kids to take care of directly (single parent/breadwinner), if u take care of the elderly (e.g grandfather), if u r a student (in both senses), if sb in ur family is in the army now already, e.g brother, if sb in ur family died in the army etc etc. If u started ur studies b4 2002 and graduated with a degree, u automatically go into the reserves. A new law came out in 2007 which said that u could be accepted into the army at any time up to the age of 50. The exceptions have been noted above
isthatu 3 | 1,164  
15 Jan 2008 /  #16
the kalashnikovs were the main weapons

My Cadet days, .22 versions of the old Lee enfeild jungle carbine from ww2(or,more often,air rifles)....you guys got AK 47s...NO FAIR :)
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163  
16 Jan 2008 /  #17
so every year they neeeded less and less conscripts.

Now they take whoever they can get.
polishcanuck 7 | 462  
16 Jan 2008 /  #18
your canadian not polish so you have nothing to worry about.

Well actually i'm both. When i go to PL in the future i plan on working on my polish passport since it will probably be easier/less paper work.

its not like the poles have ever done a lot of fighting in history anyway

Not true. I think you should pick up a polish history book at the local library.

Nice username. Did a pole "steal" your job over there in england? lol
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
17 Jan 2008 /  #19
He's from Scotland I think, polishcanuck. Does the Kraków derby count as fighting? hehehe. The Poles have done a bit of fighting but perhaps it should've been at a higher level internationally due to their conscription policy. I like the idea of a trained youth, versed in the art of weapons handling, but conscription is a bit anachronistic now. Why force youngsters to do it?
isthatu 3 | 1,164  
17 Jan 2008 /  #20
I like the idea of a trained youth, versed in the art of weapons handling

we have that ,in Sarf london an' Mossside innit.
telefonitika  
17 Jan 2008 /  #21
we does indeed ...
OP angel 14 | 86  
21 Jan 2008 /  #22
so do all 19 year olds do some form of national service now unless they have a reason-as stated in this thread-not to?
jkn005 1 | 127  
29 Jan 2008 /  #23
your canadian not polish so you have nothing to worry about. its not like the poles have ever done a lot of fighting in history anyway

Well seeing as they fought for the American Revolution, are fighting in Iraq, in Afghanistan (in the worst parts), they also played a big role in WW2. They are also part of the EU force being sent to Chad. Polish do plenty of fighting. The U.S. has praised the Special Forces in Iraq for their work there.

I think if your a student in university you can bypass the conscription law.
aussie_bum - | 1  
17 Sep 2008 /  #24
i dnt even no that poland existed!!!!
davidpeake 14 | 451  
17 Sep 2008 /  #25
is beer cheaper in the Army when you serve, as in Australia it is tax free and cheap as chips..
Robert A 1 | 102  
17 Sep 2008 /  #26
I remember when I was in the RAF, the only time we got DF beer & smokes was when we were on overseas posting, deployment or did a beer run on the Op Banner to Germany - although drinking on base was cheaper than in the local boozers. :)

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