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Do Amish exist in Poland


outintheyard 27 | 517  
17 Jan 2008 /  #1
We have members of the Amish community surrounding me here in Indiana. The do not believe in cars. the use horses and gas lights
Zgubiony 15 | 1,554  
17 Jan 2008 /  #3
There's Jakub & Aneta Kowalscy

amishamerica.typepad.com/amish_america/2007/08/amish-inpoland.html

Some info in PL: wielodzietni.org/comments.php?DiscussionID=259
krysia 23 | 3,058  
17 Jan 2008 /  #4
Aha! Good page zgubiony, but they did come from Indiana in 1993!
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
17 Jan 2008 /  #5
The Amish have been leaving Indiana due to the high land prices. SOme have even given up the religion and went on to be like us . Or I should say somewhat like us. Now they drive and believe me going from horse to horsepower is not as easy for some of them . Yikes! and dangerous too! Fortunately There usually is no more than one vehicle at a time on the roads in my area.
krysia 23 | 3,058  
17 Jan 2008 /  #6
Many Amish families from my area in Wisconsin moved to Indiana in the 1990's. Now there aren't any left. I became friends with some of them. I was invited to their homes, one family had 13 children, Levi and Sadie Yoder, no pictures on the wall, no running water, they used oil lamps. Another Amish owned the buggy shop - they did a good job restoring my antic sleigh, another had the leather shop where they sold harnesses and repaired saddles. That's how they made a living. Couple times a year they had auctions selling beautiful quilts the women would make during the winter and a bake sale. They would sell horses and train them also.

But because of land prices going up, many have moved to Indiana and other places.
But they are very nice, peaceful people. They don't believe in war and guns, violence, etc. And they don't like to have their pictures taken.
TTT  
18 Jan 2008 /  #7
The persons asking if amish exist in Poland. No...Why would they? Amish weren't Polish or any type of East European to begin with...
krysia 23 | 3,058  
18 Jan 2008 /  #8
The Amish were formed by Swiss Menonites in 1693. Most speak a dialect known as Pennsylvania German, Pennsylvania Dutch or Deitsch. In the 18 th century they begin migrating to the colony of Pennsylvania.
finT 12 | 167  
18 Jan 2008 /  #9
Actually I saw an Amish Polish family on a morning chat show here in Warsaw a while ago. So yes they do exist here!
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
18 Jan 2008 /  #10
Societies pressures have forced the amish to move to different locations I have seen them in every state in The US my neighbors do have a tractor now which is shared by all the community. It all depends on the bishop in the area. In some areas they are not allowed even closed buggies. Each area bishop has a different degree of strictness. And if one ever does get divorced, they are never allowed to marry again. It is somewhat of an exile. I know one family who left the religion and now they are not allowed to associate with any of their relatives. Their kids can't visit their cousins or anyone. I have noticed when a family does break away it does start a domino effect with the younger men especially who will all end up moving to the house of the family who broke away.
krysia 23 | 3,058  
18 Jan 2008 /  #11
They get shunned...
kman67 2 | 79  
18 Jan 2008 /  #12
Unfortunately, they sure do.

I have an ex-Amish friend. Seems one of their customs is also to let all children coming of age (I believe at age 18) experience the modern world outside their community. They have 1 year to experience everything and then they go back home. They then decide whether to accept the Amish traditions or not. If they don't, their families will not have anything to do with them anymore. They won't even sit at the same table to eat with the family member who becomes part of the modern world.
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
18 Jan 2008 /  #13
The amish also drink heavily at that age They have someone of age leave a case a beer in a ditch somewhere and they drink it that night. at least a drunken buggy is not as bad as a drunken automobile.
Harry  
18 Jan 2008 /  #14
Unfortunately, they sure do.

Can't beat a bit of casual bigotry, eh?

I have an ex-Amish friend. Seems one of their customs is also to let all children coming of age (I believe at age 18) experience the modern world outside their community. They have 1 year to experience everything and then they go back home. They then decide whether to accept the Amish traditions or not. If they don't, their families will not have anything to do with them anymore. They won't even sit at the same table to eat with the family member who becomes part of the modern world.

Bullsh*t. Any Amish who decides not to accept Amish traditions after their time ‘out in the world’ is welcome back as a visitor at any time. The whole point of the Amish is that they believe only an adult can make a commitment to god (unlike Catholics, who feel the need to indoctrinate their children as early as possible). If their child/brother/sister/cousin doesn’t want to commit to the same god as them and so does not want to be baptised, Amish will accept that decision and not hold it against the person. The problem comes when somebody does decide to be baptised and subsequently turns their back on god, in that situation Amish will turn their back on that person.
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
18 Jan 2008 /  #15
Harry! It depends on the order and the bishop of that sect . I know some shunned Amish who live pretty lousy lives with very little hope or friendship from ther people. I welcome them in my home.
Harry  
18 Jan 2008 /  #16
But you will agree that no Amish are shunned for deciding to never join the community?
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
18 Jan 2008 /  #17
yes Harry I aggree and would have a drink with you over that one!
kman67 2 | 79  
18 Jan 2008 /  #18
Can't beat a bit of casual bigotry, eh?

Sorry Harry, but I do not understand. How am I a bigot? I was relating exactly what one of my friends told me about her life. She had her one year out in the world. She decided that she wants to be a part of it. Her family has now shunned her. You are right that she can visit, but nobody will talk to her. Her family will not sit down to dinner with her. She will have to eat in another oom or wait for the family to leave before she can eat.

I think that is unfortunate. And that is exactly what I meant when I made my comment. Nothing nasty or bigoted about it. I would never want my family to shun me and that is what happened to my friend.
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
18 Jan 2008 /  #19
On a more humorous note! I once was visiting some amish freinds and the three teen age daughters were sitting on a fence . In dresses in the wind and no they were not wearing undies. Oh too bad for me to not be a teenager a that moment. Worth the laugh though with all due respect to them of course as a gentleman.
plk123 8 | 4,148  
18 Jan 2008 /  #20
Aha! Good page zgubiony, but they did come from Indiana in 1993!

lol
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
21 Jan 2008 /  #21
Doe anyone know any good amish jokes?
scarbyirp  
21 Jan 2008 /  #22
What do you call an Amish guy with his hand up a horse's ass? A Mechanic.
OP outintheyard 27 | 517  
21 Jan 2008 /  #23
See a little bit of simple humor is good for all!

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