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Talking about the weather


osiol  
12 Jun 2008 /  #1
Other than dobra pogoda, fajna pogoda, p********a pogoda, zimno, ceipło, goronco and deszsc, I don't really know how to talk about the weather. Just remembered - I also know the phrase "Pizdzi jak w kieleckim", but I'm not sure how polite this one is. Maybe this subject is not such a national pasttime in Poland as it is over here.

In the Welsh language, the weather is feminine, which seems appropriate, so the weather should always be described as what she does, she did or she will do. Pogoda is feminine, so I assume that where gender differenciation comes in... well, it's her again! But what about when something masculine occurs? I'm assuming certain elements, such as deszcz, to be masculine.

It was warm and sunny yesterday. Today we've had sunshine and showers. It's overcast now, but it will be still and sunny tomorrow. We're expecting a dry autumn. And so on and so on until I talk my own hind legs off.
polishgirltx  
12 Jun 2008 /  #2
ciepło, gorąco and deszcz

in Polish 'Pogoda' is feminine
pogoda-chick
deszcz-dude
grad-dude
tęcza-chick
chmura-chick
wiatr-dude

"Piździ jak w kieleckim"

i use it all the time ;)

... ;)
OP osiol  
12 Jun 2008 /  #3
No hermaphrodites there then?

Should I just said jest/byłeś/byłaś, and then whatever it is/was doing?

gorąco

I don't mind you mis-quoting me when it's a correction.

Okay, so I've just found a couple of things that I might want to put into the future or past, add an adjective or something:

pada deszcz - it's raining
pada grad - it's hailing
pada śnieg - it's snowing
polishgirltx  
12 Jun 2008 /  #4
No hermaphrodites there then?

słoneczko
słońce
OP osiol  
12 Jun 2008 /  #5
Am I allowed to say that a day was something?
Wczoraj był słoneczny

i use it all the time ;)

What? In Texas? You'll need it in Glasgow. I did just a bit of a laugh when I said "Pizdzi jak w kieleckim" at work the other day, possibly because the sun had briefly hidden behind a cloud and the temperature dropped by about one degree.
polishgirltx  
12 Jun 2008 /  #6
"Pizdzi jak w kieleckim"

What? In Texas? You'll need it in Glasgow.

well....i say it when the wind is very strong... and sometimes it's really strong here...
people use is sometimes differently about rain or wind...it's about strong wind...why? maybe because there is not much going on in Kielce and when you wait at a train station it's "very windy" so there you go...

'piździ jak na dworcu w Kielcach"
...

Wczoraj było słonecznie

OP osiol  
12 Jun 2008 /  #7
Does that make wczoraj neither bloke nor bird? (Neither dude nor chick).
polishgirltx  
13 Jun 2008 /  #8
neither.............

you know donkey, when there is nothing to talk about, people talk about the weather...
RubasznyRumcajs  
13 Jun 2008 /  #9
you can also use form

Piździ jak za chuja Cara - its similar to 'pizdzi jak w kieleckim' but stronger (a bit).
Bartolome  
13 Jun 2008 /  #10
"Pizdzi jak w kieleckim..."

If you happen to visit Silesia, don't forget to add '...na banhofie' (I'll omit the accent question).
OP osiol  
13 Jun 2008 /  #11
(I'll omit the accent question).

That has only made me want to know what that question is.

Cara

?
plk123  
13 Jun 2008 /  #12
i use it all the time ;)

but that is definitely in the sailor's dictionary.
Bartolome  
13 Jun 2008 /  #13
Bartolome:
Cara

?

Wasn't me ?

Piździ jak za chuja Cara - its similar to 'pizdzi jak w kieleckim' but stronger (a bit).

Cara - kogo ? czego ?
car - the big boss of Russia & Co. a long time ago.

As for the right accent question, it requires a verbal communication. I'm unable to demonstrate the pronunciation in writing.
OP osiol  
13 Jun 2008 /  #14
Wasn't me

You didn't type it, but maybe you thought it.

car

Tsar.

I'm unable to demonstrate the pronunciation in writing.

It's not one of those really shouty sort of accents that I might be able to hear from down here if you raise your voice enough?
Bartolome  
13 Jun 2008 /  #15
It's not one of those really shouty sort of accents that I might be able to hear from down here if you raise your voice enough?

No, actually it's something you do with certain syllables in a specific manner that makes them last a bit longer (I don't know the English word naming it, neither does my dictionary).

Bartolome:
car

Tsar.

I told you it's car, didn't I ?
OP osiol  
13 Jun 2008 /  #16
Dipthong? Glide? Drawl?
Bartolome  
13 Jun 2008 /  #17
Hmmm, perhaps Silesian way of speaking (further differing depending on the area) is similar in some extent to drawl. Got no idea what 'glide' is - Cambridge dictionary doesn't explain it in context of speaking.
OP osiol  
13 Jun 2008 /  #18
A link on Wikipedia yeidled this page that has an audio clip.

I'll stick to my regular pronunciation - without knowing how the same text would have sounded in standard Polish, it's not easy for a beginner like me to pick out much of what's different.
rafik  
13 Jun 2008 /  #19
"Pizdzi jak w kieleckim",

or "pizdzi jak na dworcu w kielcach" cold/blowing like on the kielce's bus station.strange.i've been there twice and it was warm and sunny there..
OP osiol  
13 Jun 2008 /  #20
Is this a somewhat overused phrase that has to be altered slightly just to keep things interesting?
polishgirltx  
13 Jun 2008 /  #21
but that is definitely in the sailor's dictionary.

yep...my sailor's vocabulary is very rich...
OP osiol  
13 Jun 2008 /  #22
Shiver me timbers. That is nautical and nothing to do with shivering from cold weather.

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