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Sayings in English that seem odd in Polish?


shewolf 5 | 1,077  
29 Jan 2007 /  #1
Here's a question for anyone who speaks Polish and who learned English later in life. What did you first think when you heard English sayings like "as easy as pie" or "it's no picnic" or "it's no day at the beach"? Are these sayings also found in Polish or do they seem weird? Are there any English sayings that you can think of that sound weird or don't make sense?

Here's another saying "a pie in the sky".
krysia 23 | 3,057  
29 Jan 2007 /  #2
How about "Bone to pick" or "sitting on pins and needles"
globetrotter 3 | 106  
29 Jan 2007 /  #3
As right as rain
Pleased as punch
Ship shape and Bristol fashion
Sick as a parrot
mad as a hatter

The list is almost endless....
Zgubiony 15 | 1,554  
29 Jan 2007 /  #4
Hotter than a fresh fcuked fox in a forrest fire...southern style :)

.....but really, no one says this :)
Amathyst 19 | 2,702  
29 Jan 2007 /  #5
Hmmmm....not something that would come in to conversation in England Mr Z....

Nice as pie
pig sick
The cat that got the cream
Working like a pit pony
Out of the frying pan into the fire
OP shewolf 5 | 1,077  
29 Jan 2007 /  #6
Thanks everyone. Those are all funny. :)
GRUBBY  
12 Dec 2007 /  #7
hI i AM LOOKING AT GETTING A TATTOO IN POLISH ( TO RESPECT MY GRANDPARENTS) SO IF THERE IS ANY ONE THAT COULD GIVE ME THE SCRIPT OR LET ME KNOW WHERE TO GET IT THAT WOULD BE GREAT
Gosiaa 2 | 89  
12 Dec 2007 /  #8
Pikuś - means its easy
blackadder 1 | 114  
12 Dec 2007 /  #9
little off topic,but it's close enough...
english word thank you very much in croatian sounds like tank is chasing a big cat
so don't talk too fast english in croatia,people might get confused,maybe call for some AT support to save a little kitten:)
gosiaczek 1 | 85  
12 Dec 2007 /  #10
and who learned English later in life

does it make any difference? my 17-year-old cousin, whom I teach english, always asks why english speakers have so strange sayings. the answer probably is that each nation (society?) has developed certain way of conceptualising world and the sayings often reflect the way the perceive it.

personally, I often wonder if "not my cup of tea" has something to do with the tradition of drinking tea:) I never use this one, although I know the meaning because it seems strange to me
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
12 Dec 2007 /  #11
rootsweb.com/~genepool/sayings.htm Here are a few more English sayings along with their explinations. :)
Irisheyz77 3 | 44  
16 Dec 2007 /  #12
lso don't talk too fast english in croatia,people might get confused,maybe call for some AT support to save a little kitten:)

*laughs*

Good to know though if I ever go to croatia.....I am a fast talker....considered so even by native English speakers.
dtaylor 9 | 823  
16 Dec 2007 /  #13
chewing on a badly rolled kebab.........ill give points to anyone who can think of the meaning:P
plk123 8 | 4,150  
15 Jul 2008 /  #14
"not my cup of tea"

most americans drink coffee not tea but the saying is quite popular here.

:P

forget the points, just pass it on anyway. :D
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
16 Jul 2008 /  #15
little off topic,but it's close enough...
english word thank you very much in croatian sounds like tank is chasing a big cat

Heh... :) I've never thought of it before.
Marek 4 | 867  
16 Jul 2008 /  #16
Sitting on pins and needles = Siedzic na szpilkach (the Polish has eliminated the needles and kept only the pins -:) Compare Yiddish-English: I'm sitting on shpilkes.
puercoespin - | 129  
16 Jul 2008 /  #17
to knock somebody up
e.g. sledz knocked krysia up :)
Barney 15 | 1,472  
17 Jul 2008 /  #18
"A bee in a bottle" is a good description of an ineffective usually young rent-a-mouth.
"Rent-a-mouth" (that is an other one) someone with a half baked opinion on everything and a full baked opinion on nothing
Marek 4 | 867  
17 Jul 2008 /  #19
I meant 'siedziEć na szpilkach' -:)
SeanBM 35 | 5,808  
17 Jul 2008 /  #20
This isn't a saying, I just never looked at the word before I was teaching it to Poles several years ago, the word is butterfly, simple enough until a student exclaimed butter fly????
Bondi 4 | 142  
20 Jul 2008 /  #21
Illogical sayings like “stone cold” instead of “ice cold” do me head in. ;o)

But I like the funny ones: “he dropped his guts” (i.e. he farted), “piece of piss” (i.e. “peace o’cake”, easy) etc.
Marek 4 | 867  
21 Jul 2008 /  #22
Preferrably a 'piece', and not 'a piss' of cake.-:) LOL

At least Hungarians don't have the same burden of comical pronunciations because of long vs. short vowels (for that matter consonant quality) as do our Spanish-speaking neighbors. Recently, I was asked in class about the meaning of the famous 'Gothic bowel movement'. Thought I would crack up with laughter, which luckily, I managed to surpress.

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