Return PolishForums LIVE
  PolishForums Archive :
Archives - 2005-2009 / Language  % width 20

expressing the present tense - grammar question


plg 17 | 263  
2 Oct 2006 /  #1
ok someone help me here please!!!!!

In English there is 3 ways of expressing the present tense. verb : to write

1-continuous present=i am writting

2-simple present=i write

3emphtic present= i do write

thanks

what do yous have in Polish.
guest12  
2 Oct 2006 /  #2
hi plg, i m just wondering, why are you interested so much in polish? :)
you are in love with a polish girl? or is it a trick that you want to affect krysia? regards and good luck.
Kowalski 7 | 621  
2 Oct 2006 /  #3
plq,
I'm not Krysia but here's my amatour take on grammar:
Polish language has FUTURE, PRESENT AND PAST.
Continous form may be indicated by additional words in sentence (now, at this moment etc)

Ja piszę
Ja piszę teraz (now)

verb in polish language may have different modes and some are similar to "tenses" in english grammar

indicative mode - (I) write = piszę
imperative mode - pisz! = do write it!
conditional mode - (I would) write = pisałbym FUTURE IN THE PAST

in polish you conjugate and decline...a lot!
:)
I'm afraid I have made you more confusing...hope not.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
2 Oct 2006 /  #4
in polish you conjugate and decline...a lot!

I'm afraid I have made you more confusing...hope not.

I see we have a poet among us........
OP plg 17 | 263  
3 Oct 2006 /  #5
ok i appreciate your replies but maybe i am too dumb to understand.

so i will answer the question myself but talking about a different language then someone can put in the polish.

ok what i was saying is :" in English there are 3ways of expressing the present tense-

i am playing-continuous present
i play-simple present
i do play-emphatic present

now i will answer the question myself but talking about a different language.##

the language is french>>>>my reply would be

IN FRENCH THERE IS ONLY ONE EQUIVALENT FOR THESE 3 FORMS-
e.g JE JOUE= i am playing/i play/ i do play.

thats the kind of reply im looking for.
so in polish >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>..???????????????????????????/help
krysia 23 | 3,057  
3 Oct 2006 /  #6
Are you talking about just "playing" or playing an instrument?
Just "Playing":
Ja się bawię - cont. present
Ja się bawię - simple present
Ja się bawię - emph. present

Playing an instrument:
Ja gram
Ja gram
Ja gram
So as you can see, it's the same as in french.
OP plg 17 | 263  
3 Oct 2006 /  #7
thank you krysia much appreciated -:{}

so its the same as french.

one equivalent for the 3 english forms. HOW EASY WAS THAT >little joke

i appreciate your replys, honest i do. -:{}

but you did have to go and spoil it by confusing me.

i hope editing this makes it go to top of pile so krysia can see it to reply
i.e am i just talking about "playing" or playing an instrument<<what the ****
what on earth is that suppose to mean. "playing" or playing.
can you play metaphorically and literally with instruments.

sorry but im back to "square one"

and you used different words

Ja się bawię = i play, i do play, i am playing
Ja gram = i play ( i think your saying this means =i play. so why does it change

so sorry krysia for being so "annoying"-:{}

you said you taught : were they anyone as "bad" as me
krysia 23 | 3,057  
3 Oct 2006 /  #8
Playing - bawię się - (as in playing with a toy or yourself,)
Playing the piano - gram na pianinie
Playing with the piano - bawię się pianinem
Playing on top of the piano - bawię się na pianinie

Got it? Good. I'm glad you're not confused anymore.
OP plg 17 | 263  
4 Oct 2006 /  #9
im as confused now that i'll ever be.

Playing - bawię się - (as in playing with a toy or yourself,)

you are naughty
glowa 1 | 291  
4 Oct 2006 /  #10
What about this in French?

Je suis entrain de jouer = I'm playing,

isn't it? But I find French a very confusing language.

About "playing"
The confusion arises from the fact that in English it has two meanings(ore more perhaps).
playing sth. vs. playing with sth.
In Polish these two meanings are expressed by two different verbs, namely.

playng sth - grać
playing with sth - bawić się

And there are exceptions.

aah, French
krysia 23 | 3,057  
4 Oct 2006 /  #11
And there are exceptions.

Yes, there are exeptions to every rule.
Now plg will get even more confused, as if he already wasn't........
OP plg 17 | 263  
4 Oct 2006 /  #12
i am playing-continuous present
i play-simple present
i do play-emphatic present

i think yous are going off on a tangent

I AM PLAYING football
I PLAY football
I DO PLAY football>>>>>> not>i am playing with my football. or i play with my football or i do play with my football.

just ******* I AM PLAYING football
I PLAY football
I DO PLAY football>>>>>>

french>je joue au football.<<<<thats it no complicated ******* examples.
krysia 23 | 3,057  
4 Oct 2006 /  #13
plg. OK. I'll make it short and sweet:
Ja gram w piłkę nożną
Just like in French. Kapish?
glowa 1 | 291  
5 Oct 2006 /  #14
Ough, nerves I see, my fault is it?

Just like in French. Kapish?

Yesterday evening, I asked my beloved French teacher. It so happens that my girlfriend teaches French, she is actualy French.. and... it's NOT just like in French. Leave it out. Polish is nothing like French.

The Frenchies do have a form which is equivalent to present continuous, while we, the Pools, don't.
OP plg 17 | 263  
5 Oct 2006 /  #15
just ******* I AM PLAYING football
I PLAY football
I DO PLAY football>>>>>>

french>je joue au football.<<<<thats it no complicated ******* examples.

this is correct in french

plg. OK. I'll make it short and sweet:
Ja gram w piłkę nożną
Just like in French. Kapish?

thank you ,thats better

plg. OK. I'll make it short and sweet:
Ja gram w piłkę nożną
Just like in French. Kapish?

this answer is not in any other posts

no wonder i get confused

so in english they are 3 ways. french one. and polsih a hundred and one

thankyou again for making me even more confused with beofre i even begun
krysia 23 | 3,057  
5 Oct 2006 /  #16
plg, the easy thing in the Polish language is that how you see it, that's how you say it.
When I teach English to Poles, they have a hard time reading because they tend to read it how they see it.
Ex: "Brat" sometimes it's pronounced "brat" other times "brot". try to explain the difference to them.
"Read" is the same as present and passed.
"to" and "too"
and the list goes on and on.... If you mastered English, Polish should be easy..(hahahaha)
OP plg 17 | 263  
6 Oct 2006 /  #17
i have mastered English thanks.:)

not sure what u mean here. (hear- i see what u mean) no im talking about "brat" and "brot.
you have lost me even in english. brat means brother in polish and brat means a little shit here. but i think its more of an americanism. it is used here but not much.

so im not sure where u get brot from . #

yes then theres read. i read all the time. i read last night before i went to bed. but this read is pronounced "red". thats easy. lol

too is quantity. too much too little. to school i go with a smile on my face. this one "to " and "too" can be confusing.

too many people have no manners
to many people , this is not the greatest of ideas.
too many people, this is not the greatest of ideas. depends the context ext
to all the polish people i "hope" i have confused yous. because im so confused by your language .

only teasing. i'll master it eventually
krysia 23 | 3,057  
6 Oct 2006 /  #18
Brat in America is
a). a spoiled rotten kid or
b). A type of a big, fat hot-dog.
It's pronounced differently. But since you don't have brats where you come from, I will disregard this.

OK. The polish word: Spotkam - meet
I am meeting - Ja się spotykam
I will be meeting - Ja się spotkam
I will meet somebody - Ja spotkam kogoś
I will meet with.. - ja się spotkam z...
bossie 1 | 123  
6 Oct 2006 /  #19
Ok, about tenses in Polish:

usually we use the basic present tense. Some verbs, however, have what is called a frequent form. For example:

I go to the cinema every Friday - Chodzę do kina co piątek

but

I go to the cinema (meaning sometimes, from time to time) - Chadzam do kina.

To be honest, you can forget the second form, as it is used really rarely.

If you ask about past or future though, the two existing forms are more similar to simple and continuous in English.

Keep my fingers crossed for your learning process :)
OP plg 17 | 263  
6 Oct 2006 /  #20
you'll have to keep them crossed forever ale jaja

Archives - 2005-2009 / Language / expressing the present tense - grammar questionArchived