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Capital Letters at the start of Polish words.


osiol 55 | 3921  
17 Feb 2008 /  #1
Capital letters at the beginning of words:

English:
First letter in a sentence
First letter in names of people and places
First letter in words in a title of a book, song or other work of art. (Often not including words like 'and', 'of' unless they are the first word).

German:
Same as above, plus
First letter of all nouns

Polish:
I'm not so sure.
I've definately been told to capitalise the first letter of certain pronouns (Ty, Twój, etc).
People and places have a capital for the first letter, but adjectival forms of country-names seem not to have this.

Discuss / explain.
plk123 8 | 4134  
17 Feb 2008 /  #2
I've definately been told to capitalise the first letter of certain pronouns (Ty, Twój, etc).

yes but only if those people are someone you know and are showing respect. this could also apply to grandma etcc.. Babcia...

god (Bóg) is always capitalized.

a country yes, but not if it's "of" that country.. Poland, polish. Polska, polskie..

the rest is the same as english, for the most part. do you have any specific examples we need to discuss?
OP osiol 55 | 3921  
17 Feb 2008 /  #3
do you have any specific examples we need to discuss?

It was mainly the personal pronouns I was interested in.

Another thing is in titles where you have small words.
Like in English, the 'and' example I gave. Should the Polish 'i' be capitalised in such places?
Mufasa 19 | 357  
17 Feb 2008 /  #4
names of days and months are also not capitalised as far as i know?
krysia 23 | 3058  
17 Feb 2008 /  #5
No, not yet.
OP osiol 55 | 3921  
17 Feb 2008 /  #6
not yet

Is there a Trend for more Words to start with a Capital Letter these Days?
krysia 23 | 3058  
17 Feb 2008 /  #7
Osiol should be capitalized
OP osiol 55 | 3921  
17 Feb 2008 /  #8
capitalized

Are we now talking about punishment rather than letters?
Mufasa 19 | 357  
17 Feb 2008 /  #9
..lol.. - hopefully letters Oś
plk123 8 | 4134  
17 Feb 2008 /  #10
Like in English, the 'and' example I gave. Should the Polish 'i' be capitalised in such places?

in a title?.. most likely your choice.. seems to willy nilly in english (US version anyway)

It was mainly the personal pronouns I was interested in.

in general the 'titles' are not cap but when addressing someone directly it is a nice gesture to do so.
OP osiol 55 | 3921  
17 Feb 2008 /  #11
when addressing someone directly it is a nice gesture to do so

Dziękuję, Pan Plk123.
That kind of thing? or

Sp*******j Ty ch**u.
Kind of balances it out a bit, eh?
plk123 8 | 4134  
17 Feb 2008 /  #12
lol... i'd go with the first only.

and with comma in there it should be panie.. if no comma then panu.
OP osiol 55 | 3921  
17 Feb 2008 /  #13
i'd go with the first only

But I won't edit out the second one.

Thanks for your help mr. 123... I mean Mr. PLK.
plk123 8 | 4134  
17 Feb 2008 /  #14
you don't have to cap anything for me.. i don't cap much.. ever. LOL

and you're very welcome. :)
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
17 Feb 2008 /  #15
book/movies titles - like normal sentences (only first word and porper names capitalized), unless the author decides otherwise. Adjectives (polski, angielski - not capitalized; pronouns (ty, ciebie, was) - small letter unless directly addressing to a person in a letter (still not obligatory). Nationalities (or ethnic groups) - capital letter.

examples:
Wczoraj obejrzałem film Andrzeja Wajdy "Popiół i diament" o walkach Polaków z niemieckim okupantem a później z polskimi komunistami.
Owczarek podhalański jest popularną rasą na Podhalu, hodują go głównie Cyganie (Romowie).

Żyd - Jew as nationality
żyd - religion (like katolik, protestant, prawosławny - not capitalized)
plk123 8 | 4134  
17 Feb 2008 /  #16
hodują go głównie Cyganie

lol... i knew something was messed up about grzegorz. :D :D
OP osiol 55 | 3921  
18 Feb 2008 /  #17
god (Bóg) is always capitalized.

I think you mean God is always capitalised.
plk123 8 | 4134  
18 Feb 2008 /  #18
No, i mean Bóg is always cap. ;) :)
dtaylor 9 | 823  
18 Feb 2008 /  #19
I spend much of my day sitting on the English bog.
Also once got stuck in a bog, started sinking aswell!!
F15guy 1 | 160  
18 Feb 2008 /  #20
Plk123 wrote: a country yes, but not if it's "of" that country.. Poland, polish. Polska, polskie..

In English, Person from Poland should be Polish, not polish. Big difference in meaning. Small p polish is wax used to make shoes shine.

Polish and polish are pronounced differently. What other English word is pronounce differently when capitalized?
OP osiol 55 | 3921  
18 Feb 2008 /  #21
No, i mean Bóg is always cap. ;) :)

You didn't capitalise the English word. Only if there are multiple gods do you leave it with a small 'g'.
Also, you failed to use a capital letter at the start of a sentence.
Oh god, whatever next?
plk123 8 | 4134  
18 Feb 2008 /  #22
YEAH.. I DON'T CAP CERTAIN THINGS FOR A REASON.. my own personal reasons. :D
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
18 Feb 2008 /  #23
Bóg is always cap.

actually, the rules are similar to English in this case.
Ares to starogrecki bóg wojny - Ares is the ancient Greek god of warfare.
Dzhaklin 3 | 166  
18 Feb 2008 /  #24
are there any things that you capitalize that might catch you off guard?
plk123 8 | 4134  
18 Feb 2008 /  #25
Ares to starogrecki bóg wojny - Ares is the ancient Greek god of warfare.

because that in reference to a dieity not the god.

are there any things that you capitalize that might catch you off guard?

yes.. see way above
z_darius 14 | 3960  
18 Feb 2008 /  #26
Polish and polish are pronounced differently. What other English word is pronounce differently when capitalized?

This has nothing to do with capitalization:

Polish those shoes using shoe polish.

These are homographs, words with the same spelling but different meaning and/or pronounciation. Some examples:

tear, console, minute, wind, present, contract, refuse, lead, sewer, number, desert, does, dove, produce.

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