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Adjective and adverb comparison


Danky Franky 2 | 1  
27 Mar 2008 /  #1
May I ask the comparative forms of the following adjectives (like twardy > twardszy)?

mokry
cienki
wolny
błędny

And the comparative and superlative forms of the following adverbs (like trudno > trudniej, najtrudniej)?

bogato
brzydko
ciekawie
gładko
prywatnie
publicznie
pusto
staro
stromo
twardo
wesoło
zdrowo

Many thanks!
Hiro - | 33  
28 Mar 2008 /  #2
Tough task because there is no comparative form of some adjectives and adverbs.
For example drewniany (wooden). One can say "bardziej drewniany" - more wooden - but it doesn't make sense. It's not obvious even for native speakers :)

I will try anyway:

mokry - bardziej mokry
cienki - cieńszy
wolny (slow) - wolniejszy; (free) - no comparative form
błędny - bardziej błędny

Adverbs
bogato - bogaciej, najbogaciej
brzydko - brzydziej, najbrzydziej
ciekawie - ciekawiej, najciekawiej
gładko - gładziej, najgładziej
prywatnie - no comparative form
publicznie - no comparative form
pusto - bardziej pusto, najbardziej pusto (puściej, najpuściej)
staro - starzej, najstarzej
stromo - bardziej stromo, najbardziej stromo (stromiej, najstromiej)
twardo - twardziej, najtwardziej
wesoło - weselej, najweselej
zdrowo - zdrowiej, najzdrowiej

Objection? :)
Michal - | 1,865  
28 Mar 2008 /  #3
You can of course simplify the process by using words such as bardziej and najbardziej before the adjective.
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
28 Mar 2008 /  #4
For your personal use, you could simplify the process even further, by just shutting up and not confusing non-Polish readers with your questionable suggestions about the Polish language and faulty translations.
gosiaczek 1 | 85  
28 Mar 2008 /  #5
You can of course simplify the process by using words such as bardziej and najbardziej before the adjective.

in some cases you shouldn't, it simply doesn't sound well

bardziej krótki, najbardziej ładny?
OP Danky Franky 2 | 1  
28 Mar 2008 /  #6
pusto - bardziej pusto, najbardziej pusto (puściej, najpuściej)
staro - starzej, najstarzej
stromo - bardziej stromo, najbardziej stromo (stromiej, najstromiej)

The alternate comparative forms for pusto and stromo that Hiro gives may be analogous to English forms:

My glass is emptier than the others, although it isn't ungrammatical, sounds less correct than My glass is more empty than the others.

But the English equivalent of Michal's suggestion (simply use more and most, forget -er and -est) simply doesn't work:

My glass is smaller than the others is correct, while My glass is more small than the others sounds very wrong.

As others have indicated, such a simplification doesn't always work in Polish either.

Many thanks for the responses.
Michal - | 1,865  
30 Mar 2008 /  #7
bardziej krótki, najbardziej ładny?

In that case does such frases as 'mam wielki rower' or 'mam wielki dom' sound better?
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
30 Mar 2008 /  #8
The question in this thread was about Adjective and adverb comparison, so no, your examples would not sound better.
tedek - | 3  
4 Apr 2008 /  #9
bogato - bogaciej, najbogaciej

It is bad form. There are in Polish no words bogaciej, najbogaciej.
bogato - no comparative form
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
4 Apr 2008 /  #10
There are in Polish no words bogaciej, najbogaciej.

I disagree, they sound strange (and aren't used often), but they exist.
AnotherGuest  
9 Apr 2008 /  #11
stromo - bardziej stromo, najbardziej stromo (stromiej, najstromiej)
Objection? :)

stromo - stromiej, pionowo ;-) ( bardziej stromo niż pionowo już nie ma)
joke ;-)

pusto - bardziej pusto, najbardziej pusto (puściej, najpuściej)

pusto - bardziej pusto, całkiem pusto

it's not a joke
term całkiem pusto is very spreaded and useful
Moonlighting 31 | 233  
25 Aug 2008 /  #12
Merged: Najwyżej

"Najwyżej"

Is this an adverb or a superlative ?
Probably a superlative but from which adjective does this come from ?

Thank you
Switezianka - | 463  
25 Aug 2008 /  #13
It is a adverb in superlative.

The basic form of the adverb is "wysoko" and the adjective is "wysoki/wysoka/wysokie", which means 'high'.

But "najwyżej" or the phrase "co najwyżej" can also mean: only, at (the) most.
Guest  
25 Aug 2008 /  #14
There is a very useful expression in Polish that comes from this i.e. najwyższy czas-its high time, in the sense of it is high time to do something or other.
Moonlighting 31 | 233  
26 Aug 2008 /  #15
In my case, the word was used in the following phrase, which I still don't quite understand :-)

"Najwyżej będziecie się promiennie uśmiechać"

[Najwyżej] you will smile radiantly to each other
Easy_Terran 3 | 312  
26 Aug 2008 /  #16
Then you will be riadiantly smiling only.

It doesn't suggest 'to each other' it rather suggest 'smiling to an audience' or whoever is going to watch you.
Michal2 - | 78  
7 Sep 2008 /  #17
It is also used as an adjective being najwyższy from which the Polish expression najwyższy czas-'its high time to do something' comes to mind.
noname  
7 Sep 2008 /  #18
"Najwyżej (if all else fails) będziecie się promiennie uśmiechać"

could it be that?
Bartolome 2 | 1,085  
7 Sep 2008 /  #19
"Najwyżej (if all else fails) będziecie się promiennie uśmiechać"

Yup. You can add some informality in that and say 'Co najwyżej, etc.'

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