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meaning of: rewolucjoniści polscy


dwwd 1 | 13  
2 Dec 2009 /  #1
Hi,

I am researching my familys history and came across something I don't know the real meaning.

My grandmother went from Poland to the USSR shortly before WWII and was repatriated in 1957. In her repatriation docs is stated "rewolucjoniści polscy", OK, I know it means something like polish revolutionaries, but what I want to know is what is the true meaning of this term. Can someone help me with that?

Thanks,

Daniel
Ziemowit 13 | 4,239  
2 Dec 2009 /  #2
She might have been one of the members of the KPP (Komunistyczna Partia Polski). I think a number of them went to the USSR before the WWII at the call of Joseph Stalin.
caprice49 4 | 224  
2 Dec 2009 /  #3
"rewolucjoniści polscy"

Reactionary perhaps?
OP dwwd 1 | 13  
2 Dec 2009 /  #4
Could be. She was a communist.

Do you think this was writen in docs in a good or a bad way? :-)
Ziemowit 13 | 4,239  
2 Dec 2009 /  #5
Reactionary perhaps?

Reactionary Polish revolutionists? What does that mean?

Your GM was lucky enough to return to PL. Some of the pre-war Polish communists were murdered in the USSR by Stalin's security forces. Those communist leaders who were imprisoned in Poland before 1939 for their communist activity saved their life thanks to that (it was, for example, the case of Władysław Gomułka, if I'm not mistaken).
caprice49 4 | 224  
10 Dec 2009 /  #6
Do you think this was writen in docs in a good or a bad way? :-)

It is difficult to say whether the expression was written in a positive or negative way. However, one would imagine if the person was troublesome to the Russians she would have been sent further east to Siberia. Potentially she could have pretended to be communist to survive. Her subsequent involvement may indicate whether she was a communist or not.
Otis Tarda - | 2  
10 Dec 2009 /  #7
Could be. She was a communist.

Do you think this was writen in docs in a good or a bad way? :-)

I'd say that it's quite probable that your grandmother has some... hmmm... trouble with pre-war Poland. It could mean anything, from being troublesome to being someone we call now "terrorist" (no offense).

And from perspective of Soviet Union authorities she was some kind of "good guy", so they used positive term "revolutionist". But, also, remember that your grandmother could exaggerate her deeds, just to get the passport to Poland.
OP dwwd 1 | 13  
10 Dec 2009 /  #8
your grandmother has some... hmmm... trouble with pre-war Poland.

And from perspective of Soviet Union authorities she was some kind of "good guy",

yeah... i got this feeling after reading KPP's history on wikipedia.

But, also, remember that your grandmother could exaggerate her deeds, just to get the passport to Poland.

I don't know what she did to deserve this "title"... lets hope that a 17yo going to the USSR was "revolutionary" enough. :-)

But i'm trying to get the file about her... if only the "Archiwum Akt Nowych" answered my e-mails...

DWWD

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