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Need info on my Russianized/Ukrainianized last name.


nobody  
28 Oct 2008 /  #1
So my last name is currently spelled Pashkovskiy. I heard in Polish its spelled Paczkowski. I would like any info on my last name. Thank you.
McCoy 27 | 1,269  
28 Oct 2008 /  #2
Paczkowski

paszkowski
Wroclaw 44 | 5,379  
28 Oct 2008 /  #3
spelled Pashkovskiy.

This may be a dumb question. But did you spell your own name correctly ?

I can find plenty Pashkovsky, but no Pashkovskiy

It is important, if you want us to do a search.
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
28 Oct 2008 /  #4
Wroclav I think you should look for

Pashkovsky

cause in Russia we spell Polish last names with cyrillic "й" on the end which is in transliteration "-iy". Thus I think you should look for the Polish variant you mentioned first.
OP nobody  
28 Oct 2008 /  #5
This may be a dumb question. But did you spell your own name correctly ?

I can find plenty Pashkovsky, but no Pashkovskiy

It is important, if you want us to do a search.

oh. Well...uh... sure if that will help. Although the Polish version of it is Paszkowski. If that helps any.

If you look at my last post, I gave a bit more info. So, does anybody have anything for me?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,379  
28 Oct 2008 /  #6
So, does anybody have anything for me?

Hold your horses. this could take a couple of days.

I did find a Lena Pashkovskiy in the States.

Are you in the States ? It helps, if we know... to be able to trace back records.
OP nobody  
28 Oct 2008 /  #7
Yea man I'm in the States. And I know that like my whole family traveled from Poland to Western Ukraine and then moved on to a different country like Moldova or something. And use different variants like Paczkowski, Pashkowski, Pashkovsky, etc. And please bookmark this topic :)
Polonius3 994 | 12,380  
28 Oct 2008 /  #8
For what it's worth, Paszkowski might have emerged as a patronymic nickname indicating Paulie's kid. Paszko is an old Polish hypocoristic form for eitehr Paweł or Pakosław. But it could have also been a toponymic nickname from such places as Paszków, Paszkowice, Paszkówka and others. Paczkowski is a possible variant spelling. There are also localities in Poland such as Paczkowo and Paczków, so Paczkowski could have origianted to indicate the bloke from Paczków.
OP nobody  
28 Oct 2008 /  #9
I have found a place in southern Poland near the German border thats called Paszkow. I don't know what that is supposed to mean though. More info please.
OP nobody  
31 Oct 2008 /  #10
So does anyone have any new info for me?
Ozi Dan 26 | 569  
2 Nov 2008 /  #11
Stefan Paszkowski - shot with 99 others (Pawiak prisoners) on 2.3.42 in reprisal for the killing of a Volksdeutsch and a kraut police officer.
OP nobody  
2 Nov 2008 /  #12
Wow man thanks for that bit of info. I must definitely be related to him. But how did you find that info out?
Ozi Dan 26 | 569  
3 Nov 2008 /  #13
nobody

My pleasure - sorry to bring bad news if he was a relative. He was a 'member of a secret organisation' according to the notice posted by Dr Fischer.

I have a list of several thousand Polish persons executed in Warsaw from 1939-1944. I started a thread on that but no one seemed interested. If I see a name sometimes I'll go and look it up.

Helena Paszkowska (b 15.3.1898) shot in the Pawiak either 20 or 21 June 1940. Reprisal killing.
OP nobody  
3 Nov 2008 /  #14
What secret organization was he a member of? And who is this Dr Fischer that you got the info form? And my last question/request: Can you please see like if this guys relatives moved to Ukraine/Moldova?

So does anybody have any more info for me. Especially about my last post.
Ozi Dan 26 | 569  
8 Nov 2008 /  #15
So does anybody have any more info for me. Especially about my last post.

Dr Fischer was the Nazi governor of Warsaw during WW2. Execution notices were put up and he ratified them.

I suspect the organisation was the AK, or Polish Home Army.

I dont have info on where these people moved.

YOu should read Rising 44 or God's Playground both by Norman Davies. These books are pretty much the authority on Polish history.
OP nobody  
8 Nov 2008 /  #16
Can you give me info on the website where Dr Fischers info was posted?
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
8 Nov 2008 /  #17
Who was the last poster on this thread?
OP nobody  
8 Nov 2008 /  #18
Excluding me, the last poster on this thread was Ozi Dan. Why? And more info is appreciated :)
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
9 Nov 2008 /  #19
Nah, I was in a stupid mood and I was gonna make a joke about nobody. You know, sb says nobody was the last poster, and I'd say that that was impossible as sb had to have posted, LOL. Dumb really but, hey, we all have such moments.
Polonius3 994 | 12,380  
9 Nov 2008 /  #20
It might have originally meant something like Paulville or Paulboro.
OP nobody  
9 Nov 2008 /  #21
I don't know about you, but those names don't sound Slavic to me at all :/
moja-droga  
15 Nov 2008 /  #22
It could be Paszkowski as well as Paczkowski.

go to Poland's Google at google.pl and search for either. You will get lots of hits for both .

After WWI , and after the Polish Russian war of 1919 where Poland beat Russia. Poland reclaimed it's ancestral lands which which today is known as Western Ukraine.

During this inter-war period (1920 to 1939), millions of Polish people settled into this more newer acquired lands known as the Kresy region.
In Sept 1 1939 Germany attacked Poland from the west, and on Sept 17, 1939 Russia attacked Poland from the East and that is how WWII began. So Russia attacked/invaded and occupied Eastern Poland starting on this Sept 17, 1939. And so a lot of paperwork was redone in Russian Cyrillic Alphabet. My family surname was changed in this way. At this time about 2 million Polish civilians were deported to Siberian Gulags to work in the frozen wasteland (why, well they needed slaves as no one else volunteered for the jobs). All people's documents were translated from Polish (English like alphabet characters) too this Cyrillic type letters. Of course a lot of Polish letters have no direct letter in Russian.

So after the war, a lot of Polish people escaped via Iran and their Russian Cyrillic papers got transliterated back into English letters. So a surname would go through two transliteration stages . Polish to Russian and then Russian to English.

So it is not hard to see that something might be lost allong the way ? ::)

Of course in Polish we have Gender associated without surnames. So a man's surname would be Paczkowski abut his wife would be called Paczkowska.

Or Paszkowski and the Mrs. as Paszkowska.

By there were quite a few people with surname of Paszkowska that escaped Siberia in 1941 and ended up in Persia/Iran. But none of Paczkowski/Paczkowska.

Hope this helps a little
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
16 Nov 2008 /  #23
My family surname was changed in this way. At this time about 2 million Polish civilians were deported to Siberian Gulags to work in the frozen wasteland (why, well they needed slaves as no one else volunteered for the jobs). All people's documents were translated from Polish (English like alphabet characters) too this Cyrillic type letters. Of course a lot of Polish letters have no direct letter in Russian.

Moja Dorogaja, Polish names in Russia are "readone" the same way. If it's Pashkovska it's likely to be "Пашковская" (Pashkovskaja), if it's male gender Pashkovsky then it's likely to be Пашковский (Pashkovskiy). There's no really serious transformation.
moja-droga  
17 Nov 2008 /  #24
Sashavskajia,

thank you for the clarification. In principal, it seems rather tripe to someone that knows Russian , Polish and or English pretty good. Or a linguist. etc... But for the average normal person they don't get it.

However in practice it is not that easy/simple. First of all very few people in the western world know or care about the Cyrillic alphabet, and it's nuances/nuisances.

Second , in practice mistakes are made in the Transliteration process. Especially in Russian Government situations where it is not a university Graduate that most often transliterates official documents. It is just some low level clerk. Hence my surname was badly transliterated and it appears wrongly on my Uncle's grave stone in Warszawa. Even though he was Polish 100%, he was forced to join the Russian army during WWII and was killed. His Russian Communists misspelled his surname on the gravestone due to this transliteration...... His army documents were in Russian but his gravestone utilizes the Polish alphabet.
seven  
10 Jan 2009 /  #25
Hi there,
My surname is Paszkowski and I was always taught that the correct pronunciation was 'Pashkovskiy'. So i'm guessing that your surname in Polish is actually Paszkowski, but in english sounded and spelt Pashkovskiy.

My grandfather immigrated after the war, and has always been reluctant to speak about his experience. I know that most his family, including mother and father were executed by gun point and he was a member of a secret organisation. I don't know too much about it but it could possibly be related to the before mentioned people. I do know that when my grandfather first immigrated, he spent some time in America. He has now been in Australia for well over 50 years...

hope that was some help

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