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Pierogi taboos ways you SHOULD NOT create/cook/season them.


Sydney 2 | 14  
23 Mar 2009 /  #1
What are ways you SHOULD NOT create, cook, and season pierogi?
Are there any dangerous chefs on these forums that cook them in forbidden ways?
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
23 Mar 2009 /  #2
Never, ever put kabanos kielbasa as a filling.
Filios1 8 | 1,336  
23 Mar 2009 /  #3
Try them with feta.
OP Sydney 2 | 14  
23 Mar 2009 /  #4
also what shouldn't you eat along with pierogi?
pgtx 30 | 3,156  
23 Mar 2009 /  #5
no ketchup
McCoy 27 | 1,269  
23 Mar 2009 /  #6
its ok with ketchup but much better with mayonese. no taboos about pierogi.
OP Sydney 2 | 14  
23 Mar 2009 /  #7
Oi! Mayonnaise?? I cannot think of anything more foul...
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
23 Mar 2009 /  #8
Add no powidla... :)
Filios1 8 | 1,336  
23 Mar 2009 /  #9
Sasha. Pierogi po rusku here in Poland are those perogies with cheese and potato.
Are those the most popular in Russia? I don't quite understand the reference..
From what I know, all sorts of perogies are made in each region of Slavija, with no specific region mastering one kind.
OP Sydney 2 | 14  
23 Mar 2009 /  #10
I hate cheese, I like the cabbage filled ones.
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
23 Mar 2009 /  #11
Sasha. Pierogi po rusku here in Poland are those perogies with cheese and potato.
Are those the most popular in Russia? I don't quite understand the reference..
From what I know, all sorts of perogies are made in each region of Slavija, with no specific region mastering one kind.

Hello, Filios! :)
To avoid misunderstanding...
Here's Russian "pirogi".
They may be stuffed with meat, cheese, powidlo (jam... usually apple) or anything else.

This is what I think you mean by Polish pierogi.

Pierogi

So the word "pi(e)rogi" is kinda false-friend in this case, cause we call pretty same way different things. This dish exist in Russian and Ukranian quisine under the different name - "vareniki" (derives from the verb "varit"=to boil). It's usually stuffed with curd, cheese etc. In case the filling is a meat we call it "pelmeni". I don't know why... probably that's only a question of my personal preference but I can't imagine them stuffed with any kind of sweet (like "powidlo") filling. However I know people that stuff 'em here with some fruit or berries (usually plums, blueberries, cherry).
Filios1 8 | 1,336  
23 Mar 2009 /  #12
This is what I think you mean by Polish pierogi.

Bracie Sasha! I believe you have mistaken Polish pierogi for Chinese cuisine! Looks to be wonton ;)

Thank you for the clarification for Russian pirogi.


  • pierogi
McCoy 27 | 1,269  
23 Mar 2009 /  #13
Russian "pirogi".

name ruskie pierogi has nothing to do with Russia. They are from Red Ruthenia ( Eastern Galicia ) the region divided between Poland and Ukraine. so Russians have every right to have no idea what are Poles talking about when they ask about ruskie pierogi.
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
23 Mar 2009 /  #14
I believe you have mistaken Polish pierogi for Chinese cuisine!

Sorry. :) I just googled it by that name and didn't pay much attention to its form. I just thought there were plenty of its forms. Your picture is much more precise. Vareniki looks similar way. :)

Looks to be wonton

Yeah... :) I sometimes order them in the US not having a chance to order pelmeni. Basically they're all very close: pastry+filling boiled.

ruskie pierogi.

So what do you finally mean by that term? :)
McCoy 27 | 1,269  
23 Mar 2009 /  #15
So what do you finally mean by that term? :)

name ruskie doesnt come from word "Росси́я" but from "Русь". Red Ruthenia in polish is Ruś Czerwona.
Sasha 2 | 1,083  
23 Mar 2009 /  #16
I heard of that version and I agree that the word "Rossija" at that point a bit artificial. But since what began as the Anciet Rus grew up to Russia, why shouldn't one treat "pirogi" as sorta heritage? In the modern Russian Ruthenians are called "rusini".
berni23 7 | 379  
6 Apr 2009 /  #17
Filios1:I believe you have mistaken Polish pierogi for Chinese cuisine!

Actually these are Dim Sun, Won Ton are quite similar, but contain only meat and there is much more very thin dough involved.
Filios1 8 | 1,336  
6 Apr 2009 /  #18
Actually these are Dim Sun

Ahh, I see. Point noted, thanks! ;)

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