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Paramedic salary in Poland



skubus 6 | 41    
11 Aug 2017  #1

Hi all.
Can someone please let me know the most up to date Paramedic salaries in Poland. I've checked numerous websites but all the information is years old. I'm aware also that Polish Ambulance staff recently took part in a campaign to have their salaries brought in line with Nurses. What was the outcome of this action?

Thanks in advance


DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #2

About 3100 PLN a month. As for raises, they demand a 1600 PLN raise. The government has proposed less, with a 400 PLN raise this year, and another 400 PLN raise next year. The paramedics are far from happy about that.
OP skubus 6 | 41    
11 Aug 2017  #3

Thanks @DominicB. Since I posted my initial query I've spoken to a former Polish Paramedic and he basically said the same as your good self. From my conversation with this gentleman I can consider a slightly different approach i.e. tutoring or lecturing to medical and paramedic students. As I'm already a trainer/tutor in BLS and Manual Handling this could be a route to investigate but I appreciate my oral Polish is nowhere near proficient so alot of study regarding the Polish language is required. Thanks again
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #4

If you're talking about a career, you should know that wages in anything related to health care are very, very low in Poland. As for tutoring or lecturing, those are also paid very low. And getting qualifications from abroad recognized in Poland is a horrendous and drawn out process. What exactly are you trying to do?
G (undercover)    
11 Aug 2017  #5

Paramedics are the last medical profession that is still making crap. There's a censensus that they should be making more but no decisions yet, it will be probably done in several steps over the next few years. Generally moving from IE to PL to work as a paramedic doesn't make sense financially + there will be tones of problems related to language, likely some legal issues etc.
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #6

Indeed. It would be downright suicidal. You would spend a lot of time running from store to store comparing prices on potatoes and cabbage. And have constant heartburn because of the dreaded nostrification process.
OP skubus 6 | 41    
11 Aug 2017  #7

Ideally work front line in pre hospital care, same as I'm doing currently but I know I can't speak enough Polish to work in this sector. I have an American Heart Association qualification in teaching Basic Life Support and CPR which is the standard taught in Poland. Along with that I'm a qualified Manual Handling and Patient Moving instructor, an internationally recognised higher level qualification.
OP skubus 6 | 41    
11 Aug 2017  #8

I appreciate your input G undercover but I'm not interested in making any fortune. I've been to Poland many many times and it's the Polish lifestyle for my child that I'm craving. Good honest innocent rearing of kids in a family based community!!
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #9

@skubus

Realistically, you chances of finding gainful employment with your present qualifications is remote to the extreme in Poland. There is a very good reason why medical professionals of all kinds are abandoning Poland in droves.

Sorry, but there is nothing you possess than can be sold for a fair price on the Polish labor market. You've been posting here for seven years already and presumably reading related threads on this during that time, so further explanation is unnecessary.

Why are you so determined to come to Poland?
delphiandomine 82 | 15,963    
11 Aug 2017  #10

Good honest innocent rearing of kids in a family based community!!

A word of warning: that same "family based community" can be very, very dark. For instance, if an uncle molests your child, don't expect the family to take your side, or to support you with reporting him to the police. The same goes if your brother-in-law scams you, and don't forget that as a Westerner, you'll be automatically assumed to be much wealthier than everyone else.

Where do you want to move to?
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #11

I'm not interested in making any fortune.

it's the Polish lifestyle for my child that I'm craving.

You'll barely make enough to survive on your own, and perhaps not even that. With a child in tow, it's flat out impossible. You'd be tempted to eat that child just to get a little protein in your diet.

Good honest innocent rearing of kids in a family based community!!

This is some sort of a joke, isn't it? Your kid will be picking through garbage bins for potato peels.

Sorry, bud, but you really have to get your act together back there in Ireland. Poland just ain't in your future.
delphiandomine 82 | 15,963    
11 Aug 2017  #12

You'll barely make enough to survive on your own, and perhaps not even that.

I don't always agree with you, but this is spot on. There's no way that he's going to be able to afford anything, unless he moves to somewhere deep in Eastern Poland where no-one sane wants to live. Even then, there aren't many jobs for paramedics in that part of the world. And he has no chance of surviving in a big city on a paramedic salary.

This is some sort of a joke, isn't it?

It's the classic tourist observation. He hasn't seen the reality, because everyone hides it from him during holidays in Poland.
OP skubus 6 | 41    
11 Aug 2017  #13

Wow. Some strong reactions to my perspective of what Poland is all about that's for sure. I'll reply to some of these discussions in a while. Have to get my head down as I'm on duty tonight but I will continue this conversation
Sparks11 - | 282    
11 Aug 2017  #14

honestly, you'd probably do better teaching english. you could sell yourself a medical english expert if youve got some drive. the language issue will disqualify you from working in your field. youd need near native level fluency. no sick person wants to deal with someone who they have limited communication with, plus it would open you up to all kinds of liability issues. lecture about medical stuff in english? who would hire you? maybe if you were a visiting doctor or surgeon but short of that no one will care.
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #15

you could sell yourself a medical english expert if youve got some drive.

No, he couldn't. That market is pretty over-saturated because of the American and Canadian medical students in Poland who are willing to teach medical English for beer money.
Sparks11 - | 282    
11 Aug 2017  #16

plentyof people in warsaw make 8 to 10 k gross a month teaching english. most english students want more than a 20 something year old med student who knows nothing about communicating the language. if this person is willing to combine the medical knowledge with a drive to teach, theyll be ok here, the market is in no way saturated.
jon357 67 | 12,739    
11 Aug 2017  #17

students in Poland who are willing to teach

'Willing to teach' is a long way from being able to get people to acquire language skills.

There's a whole toolbox of skills, techniques, methodology etc. If skubus is prepared to learn those (it takes more than just a 4 week course) and is able to put that into practice, his medical experience, and skills experience as a paramedic could be a profitable and rewarding thing.

He'd need to be in Warsaw though, in order to maximise his income and opportunities.
polinv    
11 Aug 2017  #18

Making such a big change to skrimp and save is questionable. To live comfortably you need 10k net a month, means you wont be looking at prices when you shop, but after living costs for the house and family, exotic holidays will be just the once a year. On 20k you can live well and still put a fair bit aside to invest. 40-50 grand you can live the high life or live well and make big inroads into your investment portfolio muchrooming your future income.
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #19

plentyof people in warsaw make 8 to 10 k gross a month teaching english.

Definitely not "plenty", and by far most of them have been there for some time and are already long established. Breaking into the higher paying realms of English teaching is much harder now than it used to be. And the time it takes to get established and build up a good clientele is much longer. That ship sailed long ago. Poland is a lousy country if you are considering a career in ESL.

most english students want

To pay as little as possible. And find med students more than adequate for their needs. And wouldn't view an older paramedic as much more qualified.

There's a whole toolbox of skills, techniques, methodology etc. If skubus is prepared to learn those (it takes more than just a 4 week course)

You do see the contradiction here, of course.
OP skubus 6 | 41    
11 Aug 2017  #20

Polinv...40 to 50 grand a month?? Sounds unbelievable
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #21

@skubus

That would be for a senior executive at a major financial institution.
OP skubus 6 | 41    
11 Aug 2017  #22

Aha. Thanks for the clarification DominicB
jon357 67 | 12,739    
11 Aug 2017  #23

You do see the contradiction here, of course.

None at all - if he acquires a sound theoretical base and the myriad skills to implement that, he can obtain a good income from it. His existing professional background can ease him into a niche market. As it did me.

Breaking into the higher paying realms of English teaching is much harder now than it used to be.

It's still possible, however yes, there is constant competition from the lower end of the market, for those without the skills but who are willing to accept a lower price for their services. As a paramedic, he certainly has a work ethic and a skills base that will be useful to him.

Materials writing could be a good specialism (there is a dearth of good Medical English materials) however he'll need the theoretical and methodoligical base in language acquisition first.
Sparks11 - | 282    
11 Aug 2017  #24

i dont know where youre getting your info. rates are going up in warsaw for teachers worth their salt. people are quite willing to pay for better service. bottom feeder teachers can still make it with high turnover of students. are you working here?
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #25

None at all - if he acquires a sound theoretical base and the myriad skills

From a measly one-month course? Which is hardly intellectually demanding? Get real.

there is constant competition from the lower end of the market

The competition from the higher end of the market is much, much more formidable. You're talking about guys who have been here for ten or twenty years, the battle-hardened survivors of thousands who have tried, not clueless newbies fresh off the plane.
jon357 67 | 12,739    
11 Aug 2017  #26

From a measly one-month course? Which is hardly intellectually demanding? Get real.

Looks like you misunderstood, perhaps deliberately. The bit that said:

it takes more than just a 4 week course

You're talking about guys who have been here for ten or twenty years, the battle-hardened survivors of thousands who have tried

Half of the long termers are washed out people spooling out Headway for private language schools, or deadbeat Americans doing so-called 'conversation classes' which they imagine means just chatting.. Another quarter do or want to do other things like proofreading. The rest have other strings to their bow or a very high skill level, and can earn very well indeed.

People who specialise in Medical, Legal, Technical, Petrochemical, Financial, Diplomatic, Military etc, and have a sound theoretical and methodological base are a different kettle of fish - they earn well, however must be based in the capital, be prepared to travel, and actually know what they're doing.

For a paramedic, there are plenty of opportunities to use their professional background; they must however be able to sell their services to Doctors, Nurses, Dentists etc., mostly ones who are considering working abroad. Solid UK/RoI experience would give the OP the credibility to do this and an understanding of how to achieve it.

He would do well to talk to any Polish colleagues he has back home, and gauge their reaction (as well as make contacts). Contact with the various professional bodies in Poland once he's arrived wouldn't go amiss either.
DominicB - | 2,050    
11 Aug 2017  #27

Half of the long termers are washed out people spooling out Headway

Yes. But that does not contradict what I said, which is that practically all of the high-enders are long-termers (or actual certified professional teachers who teach at the international schools).

Is this guy going to be able to make a decent living for him and his kid by teaching English? My money's on "no". He's been posting about coming to Poland and working as a paramedic for seven years now, and he's still pretty clueless. Delusional, even.
jon357 67 | 12,739    
11 Aug 2017  #28

practically all of the high-enders are long-termers

Actually, they aren't. Poland isn't Germany. Specialised work isn't general work.

he's still pretty clueless. Delusional, even

Remember Dominic, that he's looking for ideas, and suggestions. Not bitterness from people who tried and could never make it themselves.

If he wants to come whether as a Paramedic with a strong command of Polish or as a Trainer with the skills to do that, he'll need to plan carefully - one reason I suggest strongly he speaks to medical colleagues who are from Poland. Not just one or two people, (since ifor every two Poles there are three opinions) but more than that, and analyse what they say.

As a Paramedic, he can come, and if necessary easily go back to working long or short-term in an English-speaking country providing he keeps up to date with his professional registration.

You'd be surprised how many people live in one country and mainly work in others.
mafketis 16 | 4,691    
11 Aug 2017  #29

there is a dearth of good Medical English materials

And there's a need for that in Poland because....
rozumiemnic 9 | 3,360    
11 Aug 2017  #30

Is this guy going to be able to make a decent living for him and his kid by teaching English?

lets be honest, no.
newly qualified TEFL teachers are ten a penny. Unless they have something more to offer, like a solid legal or engineering background, some years of experience, a Masters in ELT, etc etc.

And some of these language schools take the mick they really do. They want all that,. the qualifications, the degree, the experience, yet offer very little in return.

For example, 3000 zl a month..could you raise a family on that? I think not.




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