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Moving to Poland from the USA. Question concerning CELTA certificate.I need help


tdra6o 1 | -
16 Sep 2009 #1
I fell in love with a girl this summer. She came to the United States working as an au pair. Two days ago she had to move back home to her city. She lives in Wroclaw. First I am going to her city to visit. But I am going to want to stay; It is my dream to teach English in another country. She wants to help me. I"m wondering where the good schools are in Wroclaw offering CELTA courses. Please, this question does mainly concern my attachment to a Polish young lady. It sounds silly but I really need some help. I am high off life and this is a great opportunity.
plk123 8 | 4,150
16 Sep 2009 #2
I fell in love with a girl this summer.

there is your trouble. good luck.
Ajb 6 | 232
16 Sep 2009 #3
ihworld.com/teachertraining/courses.asp
ihworld.com/directory/affiliate.asp

As far as i know IH have a fantastic reputation and CELTA is only £655

IH Wroclaw is in the centre just off Rynek, saything that i didn't do mine there, i done mine in england but i hope that helps you a little :)
scottie1113 7 | 898
16 Sep 2009 #4
i done mine in england

Done? I did mine in Warsaw. A CELTA is a CELTA no matter where you get it and it will open doors that would otherwise be closed to you. And IH does have a good reputation.

One caution. You've only got very little time to get your CELTA and find a job in Poland. You're only permitted to stay in a Schengen zone country for 90 out of 180 days. Lots of threads about that on this forum and also another teaching forum. Start researching this now.

If this thing with your girlfriend doesn't work out, are you prepared to be in Poland by yourself? Believe me, you'll have to adapt to a major cultural difference between Poland and the US (which state?) and the language is a bear to learn.

Good luck.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,788
16 Sep 2009 #5
Done?

Quite normal expression in many parts of England to say 'done' rather than 'did'.
szarlotka 8 | 2,209
16 Sep 2009 #6
Using done?

Especially popular among football managers. The boy done well Mottie comes to mind;)
lowfunk99 10 | 397
16 Sep 2009 #7
I took my Celta in Wrocław. Actually, its the least expensive place to take it. I learned a lot.

ih.com.pl/en/wroclaw/about_the_school,282.html

However, I am not sure you can take it this year anymore, usually the last class of the year is in September.

Do not work with out a work permit.
scottie1113 7 | 898
17 Sep 2009 #8
Quite normal expression in many parts of England to say 'done' rather than 'did'.

I didn't know that. But I done good to learn it.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Sep 2009 #9
In Scotland, we say 'the boy/lad done good'. Never heard of that?
scottie1113 7 | 898
17 Sep 2009 #10
Yeah, we say that in the US as well even though we're aware that it's not grammically correct English, more of a colloquial thing. But hey, that's how we talk. And really, I was funnin when I posted that.
jeje
17 Sep 2009 #11
WOW only 655? I paid 750 for my CELTA in Kraków...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Sep 2009 #12
I paid 950 pounds and that was 5.5 years ago. Still, Basil Paterson College in Edinburgh is a rather elitist kind of school, they think they are super. I've had some experience with this kind of Scottish git. At postgrad level, the professors were unprofessional. You award marks for sound reasoning skills and DON'T mark down because the student has a different opinion.

If I met my profs or teachers again, I'd tell them to go and fu*k themselves!! I think there was some element of jealousy on their part. I have serious issues with those that have the power to mark me down for their lame systems of evaluation. I'm always fair with my students and am not overly critical.
WarkaWarka
19 Sep 2009 #13
I've been teaching English in Wroclaw for 2 years without a CELTA. You don't need it really as long as you are professional and can explain why we use certain tenses in certain situations.

Finding a job teaching English is not so difficult, you'll have much bigger problems simply adjusting from an American lifestyle to a Polish one...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
19 Sep 2009 #14
I agree, you can sometimes slip through the net but some schools demand it.
Simon123
5 Nov 2009 #15
Hi all. I'm trying to decide between Krakow and Budapest for the CELTA. I have a feeling that either course will be fine, but can anyone give me some info regarding the facilities, accommodation etc at either place?

thanks,

Simon
n00dles
14 Apr 2010 #16
hey simon,
did you get any feedback? did you take the course? I have same dilemma. Would appreciate your comments.
lukaszpoznanski 10 | 39
14 Apr 2010 #17
Just a note about the International House in Krakow. I was interviewed for their May 14th course and accepted. I came to Krakow and dropped into the IH to pay the deposit. I was told that the course may not run after all, and that they would call me "in a few days". That was almost three weeks ago, and not a word. My impression is that the Kraków branch is unprofessional and not worthy of your business. Additionally, the Wrocław programme costs less.

I'm now teaching privately (without certification) and doing just fine, although I do speak Polish so that helps. I found a great apartment in the Officer District (which is a 20 minute walk from the Rynek) for just 400zł/CAN$145/mo (with several other people). When I'm not teaching or exploring Kraków, I'm sitting on my private balcony, enjoying the third-storey view with a glass of wine in hand. I love Polska!
scottie1113 7 | 898
14 Apr 2010 #18
If you want to teach in Poland, I recommend doing your CELTA in Poland. You'll have a month to get used to the country and make contacts with schools you want to work for after the course. And you might even pick up a few words in Polish. Pretty useful here.
Aliloveskrakow - | 19
19 May 2010 #19
Just a note about the International House in Krakow. I was interviewed for their May 14th course and accepted. I came to Krakow and dropped into the IH to pay the deposit. I was told that the course may not run after all, and that they would call me "in a few days". That was almost three weeks ago, and not a word.

Hi Lukasz,

Here's a little update, as I was in the same(ish) boat as you. I booked and paid my deposit for the July CELTA course at IH Krakow, only to find out that they're no longer affiliated with IH Worldwide and that CELTA will not allow them to host a course there, why I do not know, though . Anyhow, I wrote to CELTA direct and here is an extract of the reply I received via email a couple of days ago:

"IH Krakow are no longer affiliated with IH Worldwide and now go by the name of Instant English and the May CELTA course currently being run in Krakow is actually being administered by IH Katowice as (what Cambridge ESOL term) an "off-site" course. This is a short-term arrangement only but one that is fully authorised and supported by Cambridge ESOL.

From 21st June onwards CELTA in Krakow will be available at the British Council."

I am very impressed that you have managed to find work anyhow and as I speak a little Polish (very little) I am wondering if I really must do this dreaded CELTA course as I've heard nothing but scare stories about how difficult it is?

If anyone wishes to share their experience of the CELTA course I am all ears!

Thanks

Ali
delphiandomine 83 | 17,788
19 May 2010 #20
I am wondering if I really must do this dreaded CELTA course as I've heard nothing but scare stories about how difficult it is?

They're nothing but scare stories. Quite frankly put, anyone who puts the time and effort into it won't fail it - but if you go drinking every night after classes, then you will.
Dougpol2 1 | 76
19 May 2010 #21
I've heard nothing but scare stories about how difficult it is?

Just learn to be a brown-noser and you'll be fine. The RSA was originally created by that chap who created International House, to earn himself a few bob, and to act to teaching like a driving licence does to driving.

Just because one holds the modern equivalent doesn't mean one can teach, just as a driving licence doesn't prove much either.
The difference is that there isin't any arse licking to be done when training for one of the above.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
20 May 2010 #22
if you ask me, the CELTA for most people is the difference between getting a job in Poland in 2 weeks, or 4 weeks. so essentially, it doesn't matter whether you have it or not.

schools look at it as a guarantee that you're serious. you invested the time and money, i guess you aren't going to leave the country next week. other than that, once you have 6 months under your belt and you're not a complete tool, as a native speaker, the CELTA is like the guy that hooks you up with your first office job. you needed him then, you don't need him now.

any education is good education, and i can understand why people do the CELTA. coming from another country, not knowing the language or the system, going for a CELTA is at the very least peace of mind.

BUT, i wouldn't recommend it to anyone unless they were really young and clueless. In Wroclaw, a native with a college degree and a good head on his/her shoulders finds work without a problem.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
20 May 2010 #23
I had 2 uni degrees plus 2 years exp in TEFL yet still I chose to do the CELTA. It is a worthy investment and many who are serious ask for it.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
20 May 2010 #24
Hi all. I'm trying to decide between Krakow and Budapest for the CELTA. I have a feeling that either course will be fine, but can anyone give me some info regarding the facilities, accommodation etc at either place?

thanks,

Simon

Maybe take into consideration the cost of living for the month you're doing it.

They're nothing but scare stories. Quite frankly put, anyone who puts the time and effort into it won't fail it - but if you go drinking every night after classes, then you will.

Agreed. If you listen to what they tell you and do what they ask you then you're more than half-way there. If you have any experience it is a major plus; if not, it doesn't matter. I think a lot of the scare stories come from people who had a problem with being told what to do and/or have a problem talking to groups of people.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
20 May 2010 #25
Hi all. I'm trying to decide between Krakow and Budapest for the CELTA. I have a feeling that either course will be fine, but can anyone give me some info regarding the facilities, accommodation etc at either place?

Krakow is cheaper than Budapest in every way Possble, I'd go as far as to say its almost double the living costs...Budapest is also larger, Krakow more compact, I personaly think Krakow is safer than Budapest (some right rough bits to it!)..But Budapest is beautiful and has great night-life, Hungarian food is lovely, dark beer is great and Hungarians are nice friendly helpful people..Poles in shops and restaurants are miserable unhelpful lazy kunts and the foods nothing to write home about..Im sure either will be an experience.
Aliloveskrakow - | 19
20 May 2010 #26
Just learn to be a brown-noser and you'll be fine.

Hahaha thanks I will make sure I take lots of apples!

if you ask me, the CELTA for most people is the difference between getting a job in Poland in 2 weeks, or 4 weeks. so essentially, it doesn't matter whether you have it or not.

Mmm interesting thanks.

They're nothing but scare stories. Quite frankly put, anyone who puts the time and effort into it won't fail it - but if you go drinking every night after classes, then you will.

Good advice, that's me off the booze for a month then!

I had 2 uni degrees plus 2 years exp in TEFL yet still I chose to do the CELTA. It is a worthy investment and many who are serious ask for it.

Thanks Seanus, I admire your professionalism and I think this is the best advice.

Regards,

Ali x
Dougpol2 1 | 76
20 May 2010 #27
still I chose to do the CELTA. It is a worthy investment and many who are serious ask for it.

The Celta - I would say to the original poster, It gives some self-confidence, and a passport. Some will live without it - horses for courses, it takes the heat off a little as another poster just said. Still, what does it really prove? Not sure if I ever expect to be hired, or would hire a teach, on that 700 quid piece of parchment alone.

Some can, some can't......... and before I criticise others I always look to myself - hope the trainers do too!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
20 May 2010 #28
That's true! It's long behind me now but more important is the range of methods that you teach afterwards. CELTA was too rigid in its approach. I appreciate methodology but only to a certain point. I'm not here to go into great depth on any one topic but to glide through different tasks.

I do feel that 950 quid plus living costs was a little steep but what's done is done. It was a great experience and I loved living in a nice part of Edinburgh. If you see it in those terms then it can be a worthwhile investment.
richasis 1 | 420
21 May 2010 #29
tdra6o:
I fell in love with a girl this summer.

there is your trouble. good luck.

but if you go drinking every night after classes, then you will.

and there's your challenge. :)
tonyhares - | 3
28 May 2010 #30
I"m wondering where the good schools are in Wroclaw offering CELTA courses

It's singular I'm afraid .... I've been researching this myself but it seems they sure don't like answering emails. I'm onto the fourth email address I've found for IH Wroclaw over two weeks ... just a simple question as well .... wish me luck!


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