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Moving to Poland, will I be able to find work with a masters in Economics and an MBA?


redfive 1 | 2
8 Jan 2014 #1
Good morning to everyone,
I am 34, Italian and I am interested in moving to Poland. I have been there few times, but I do not speak any Polish yet.

My working experiences are mainly in purchasing, I worked for three years as a senior buyer in Fiat group purchasing and I am now working as a category buyer in Ansaldo STS.

I have a masters degree in economics and an MBA, does anyone have any suggestion on how to proceed with moving?
As far as documents I am a EU citizien and therefore I don't think I need to get a VISA or anything like that (am I correct?).

Thank you for your help,

Emanuele
Monitor 14 | 1,820
8 Jan 2014 #2
Why are you telling us about your professional experience? In order to move to Poland you should buy plane or bus ticket. Ryanair is the cheapest option. You are right that you don't need Visa. Passport or ID is enough. Take warm clothes, because usually winter is colder in Poland than in Italy.
OP redfive 1 | 2
8 Jan 2014 #3
I was telling you my experiences just to know if that would be ok for Polish job market and how hard it would be for me to find a job,

especially given the fact that I do not speak Polish yet.
I have been there a few times, but as I have a job here in Italy I just want to be careful before leaving it.

So I just wanted to know how hard it is and if anyone here has any suggestion on how to find a job in Poland.

Thanks
DominicB - | 2,709
8 Jan 2014 #4
Your best chance would be to get hired by an Italian or other international company that does business in Poland, and then get transferred to their operations in Poland.

Otherwise, you are going to have an extremely difficult time finding any work at all other than a poorly paid one in a call center. There is no shortage of people with masters in economics and MBAs in Poland; in fact, there is a positive glut of them, so the competition you will face will be fierce.

There is a small chance that you might be able to find work with a company that requires a purchasing agent that speaks Italian, but without Polish, your chances are greatly reduced. Again, you would have better luck trying with an Italian or other international corporation.

Bottom line: don't even think of quitting your job in Italy until you find an actual secure well-paid job in Poland. As for finding one, I wouldn't hold my breath. Good jobs are far and few between here, and, like I said, the competition for them is fierce.
smurf 39 | 1,981
8 Jan 2014 #5
You could try to get a job with Fiat in Gliwice, I've met a few Italians living around here that work for them, might work out especially since you worked for them before. Good luck.
Monitor 14 | 1,820
8 Jan 2014 #6
I think that your qualifications are useless in Poland without knowledge of Polish language.
smurf 39 | 1,981
8 Jan 2014 #7
No, the Italians I know living around Kato/Gliwice don't speak a word of Polish and don't need it for their jobs.

However, to live a decent life here you should start learning it. It's a really, really difficult lingo and it would be an advantage if you learned some before moving.
Monitor 14 | 1,820
8 Jan 2014 #8
No, the Italians I know living around Kato/Gliwice don't speak a word of Polish and don't need it for their jobs.

I imagine that they don't do just sales there.
Harry
8 Jan 2014 #9
No, the Italians I know living around Kato/Gliwice don't speak a word of Polish and don't need it for their jobs.

The difference would be that they were sent to Poland by employers who were very happy to have staff here who don't speak Polish.
smurf 39 | 1,981
8 Jan 2014 #10
I imagine that they don't do just sales there.

Correct, the OP doesn't have to do sales though.

The difference would be that they were sent to Poland by employers

Suppose so, but still just an idea from him to try...or maybe try and get back your old gig in Fiat OP, then ask for a transfer?
DominicB - | 2,709
8 Jan 2014 #11
maybe try and get back your old gig in Fiat OP, then ask for a transfer?

That would be the smart approach, either with Fiat or some other company. Especially if he could keep his western rate of pay.

the OP doesn't have to do sales though.

That is likely what he would end up doing if he came here to Poland and got the job here. Entry-level sales positions are very poorly paid, and it's not very rewarding work, especially if it's cold-call sales in a call center.
smurf 39 | 1,981
8 Jan 2014 #12
That is likely what he would end up doing if he came here to Poland and got the job here. Entry-level sales positions are very poorly paid, and it's not very rewarding work, especially if it's cold-call sales in a call center.

Very true, I wouldn't wish that job on anybody moving here.
Nojas 4 | 110
8 Jan 2014 #13
Lots of people with no knowledge writing in the thread. The real answer is yes, the job market is very good at the moment for European people with business degrees. With your qualifications you will find work pretty easy, but know that it is your language that is your biggest asset and that perhaps the jobs aren't on the highest level. But European people are getting hired left and right. Polish not needed since English is the office lingo in the thousands of international offices around Poland.

I found work two months after arriving and didn't even try that hard. Within Finance/Accounting.

To get you started:

infopraca.pl/praca?q=italian&lc=
OP redfive 1 | 2
9 Jan 2014 #14
Thank you for your reassuring answer, as a matter of fact I do not think it would be the easiest thing finding a job in a foreign country, but I also think that my qualifications and my experiences are worth something.

I know that knowing the Polish language is quite an important matter, but there must be somewhere where the working language is English and not Polish and in the meantime I can learn Polish as well.

The problem could be that I am not really willing to start from the bottom again after all these years, but I will try looking on some websites like the one you suggested.

Thank you
satomoto 1 | 6
2 Aug 2017 #15
Merged:

Thinking of moving to Poland - Study / Teach / Work?



Hi guys, I've been to Poland once eight years ago and loved it. I am thinking of moving there to live for a year or two and maybe a good way is to:

1. Do a Masters. Maybe in the line of economics
2. Teach. I consider myself native in Mandarin and English.
3. Remote work.

Item 1 and 2 will probably allow me to enjoy Polish life better than working remotely in Poland for jobs.

Advice greatly appreciated :)
SamTexas - | 19
2 Aug 2017 #16
@satomoto
Getting a master is a great option as the tuition is rather cheap compared to other countries, yet you get good education here.
Teaching English/Mandarin in Poland is tricky, according to what I know, average Polish schools pay very little to teacher. Of course you get treated well in international schools in Poland.

I would say remote work is a better choice if the teaching offer is not attractive.
satomoto 1 | 6
3 Aug 2017 #17
@SamTexas

Thanks for the advice :)

Getting a Masters is certainly a good way. I have been to Krakow and loved it there, but am open to any good university with a good city vibe. Do you have any to recommend?

My background is computer but I'd like to give a go at economics.
SamTexas - | 19
3 Aug 2017 #18
@satomoto
Uniwersytet Jagiellonski and Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza ranked No.2 and 3 in this years TOP universities in Poland, right after University of Warsaw. You can take a look and see if they offer master of economics and which one is better.
satomoto 1 | 6
3 Aug 2017 #19
Jagiellonski

Thanks man! Taking a look right now :)


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