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Things that Polish-American should know about Poland.


Ironside 51 | 11,338
15 Jan 2011 #151
I couldn't give two shits about what bugs you, stop cryin' like a lil' gir

Why do you answer then ?Crying ? stop projecting your feeling sis, did I make you cry ?poor babe !
Actually I can tell you to buzz off and do not comment about things you do not understand enough to comment about ! Specially about country you know little about and have no intension to live in !
f stop 25 | 2,513
15 Jan 2011 #152
Most of us find a sense of who we are with our own actions: how we treat our family, who do we pick as friends, the meaning of our work, what we choose to do in our free time, etc.

Ultra-nationalist "patriots", by definition, are very close-minded. I found that most of them do not get along with their own family members, have no real friends, and are unfullfilled at their jobs.

So, for their sense of pride and belonging they pick something they have absolutely no control over, and do not have to do anything about, like a happenstance of their birthland. It's convenient, because they can't really fvck that up, either.

They draw a line in sand between what they know and what they fear - and they defend it fiercely. Their ego depends on it. They think it gives their lives meaning, while in reality it creates most of the discord in the world.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
15 Jan 2011 #153
Why do you answer then ?Crying ?

I'm responding to your weeping pu**y "one thing that's been bugging me for some time" you sound like a little wimp. Pizduƛ
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
16 Jan 2011 #154
The only wimp is you - after all, you're the one that told a foreign power that you renounce your Polish citizenship - all for the sake of having more money.

Ironside is totally right - and furthermore, he actually lives here! We may not agree, but heck, at least he's really Polish!
Teffle 22 | 1,321
16 Jan 2011 #155
+ 1 fstop. For what it's worth...
Bzibzioh
16 Jan 2011 #157
how we treat our family, who do we pick as friends, the meaning of our work, what we choose to do in our free time, etc.

No, it's actually quite the opposite: who we are has effect how we relate to the environment we live in and all our relationships.

Ultra-nationalist "patriots", by definition, are very close-minded.

We don't discuss patriotism in this thread.

-1 from me
Harry
16 Jan 2011 #158
the bilateral convention is just a request of honouring each others rights,

Why must you always lie? The convention is not a request to do anything: it is a commitment to which "both Parties have agreed".

You forgot to mention that Americans, Polish or otherwise, do not need visas to visit Poland.

And that has how much effect on what is being lied about by ShortHairHolocaustDenier (i.e. "if they [US citizens visiting Poland] break laws, U.S ambasy simply can't help them in those cases.")? Oh yes, none. Interesting to see you of all people siding with the holocaust denier.

What you also "forgot" to mention from the very source you quoted is:

Poland treats nationals of other countries whom it considers Polish citizens as if they were solely Polish.

How interesting: neither source which I quote contains that statement. How surprising to see you of all people telling bare-faced lies. In fact what the treaty clearly states is: "Persons entering the Polish People's Republic for temporary visits on the basis of United States passports containing Polish entry visas will, in the period for which temporary visitor status has been accorded (in conformity with the visa's validity), be considered United States citizens by the appropriate Polish authorities for the purpose of ensuring the consular protection provided for in Article 29 of the Convention and the right of departure without further documentation, regardless of whether they may possess the citizenship of the Polish People's Republic. So you are actually lying, yet again. Pathetic.

the bottom line is that unless an individual Polish person formally wishes otherwise, once a Pole always a Pole. And that's the law.

Not in the USA. And not in Poland if that Pole has become an American and entered on their American passport. But why should a turncoat like you worry about telling the truth? You've already said that you lied when taking your oath of allegiance. I bet you're the kind of Pole who would have been joined three different armies as WWII progressed.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
16 Jan 2011 #159
-1 from me

And this is why people think Polish people are negative...
Harry
16 Jan 2011 #160
Wikipedia states the same, in the very article Harry linked to, and immediately under the fragment he quoted.

And another lie from you, you're really on a role! I linked to no Wikipedia articles. I linked to The Consular Convention between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Polish People's Republic and to the US Dept of State's publication "Consular Notification and Access" from July 2010. But of course you prefer the version on Wikipedia. Did you edit it yourself to make it say what you want it to?

What are you like 18? you don't even remember living in communist Poland keep your stupid comments to yourself.

And given that you have said that you were a little child when you left Poland (meaning, I would assume, about five years old) and you have been in the USA for 20 years (i.e. since 1991), you would have been about three years old when communism ended. So how much do you remember about communism, boy?
z_darius 14 | 3,968
16 Jan 2011 #161
But of course you prefer the version on Wikipedia.

That wikipedia fragment is a direct quote from your source. And the fact remains - American citizens do not need visas to visit Poland. I linked to a Polish government site stating that fact. Hence the 1970's treaty is as good as as the Treaty of Versailles today. Actually it's as good as the Treaty of Versailles was to Britain before WW2 when it betrayed Czekoslovakia.
Harry
16 Jan 2011 #162
Hence the 1970's treaty is as good as as the Treaty of Versailles today.

Which explains why as of July 2010 the US State Department say that it is in effect. Oops, you just got caught lying again.

That wikipedia fragment is a direct quote from your source.

And neither of the documents I linked to contain the phrase "Poland treats nationals of other countries whom it considers Polish citizens as if they were solely Polish.", despite you claiming that one of them did. Which would make that claim of yours the same as your claim that I linked to Wikipedia, i.e. a lie.

And the fact remains - American citizens do not need visas to visit Poland.

Yet more lies from you: American citizens need visas to visit the entire Schengen zone. The visa is given to them at the immigration checkpoint at which they enter the Schengen zone and can be denied to any American for any valid reason (for example, overstaying the 90-day tourist visa or working on a tourist visa). I personally know Americans who have been refused entry to the Schengen zone. How can they be refused entry if they don't need a visa?

Actually it's as good as the Treaty of Versailles was to Britain before WW2 when it betrayed Czekoslovakia.

Yes, clearly Britain should have stopped the invasion of Czechoslovakia by attacking the country which led the invasion, i.e. Poland. I do love how Poles can whine about 'western betrayal' given that they were the first country to invade Czechoslovakia.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
17 Jan 2011 #163
And this is why people think Polish people are negative...

and your so positive about polish people del???

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

you offer any help for us Polish Americans ?? anything we should know about
Poland ?? ehhh any positive feedback from you for us sausage waving, shirt wearing
potato pancake love my busha peeps over here???

yeah, how about that.
lowfunk99 10 | 397
17 Jan 2011 #164
Ultra-nationalist "patriots", by definition, are very close-minded. I found that most of them do not get along with their own family members

This is true no matter what country they are from.

Yet more lies from you: American citizens need visas to visit the entire Schengen zone.

Harry this is not true. No official visa is required for a US person visiting Schengen for up to 90 days.

Most countries can turn others away for what ever reason.

I have a red stamp of death in my passport. I served my time out of Schengen and have been able to return with no problem. I do have the proper visa for work this time. :-)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
17 Jan 2011 #165
A dull Scot

The limbo (the Caribbean bend-over-backward dance under a very low stick) was invented by a Scotsman trying to get into a pay toilet!
johnny reb 37 | 7,652
25 Jul 2018 #166
If you are a naturalized US citizen, you have renounced your allegiance to Poland. You have promised to take up arms against enemies

How about you Rich, have you promised to take up arms against America's enemies ?
johnny reb 37 | 7,652
15 Feb 2019 #167
This would mean that all the Muslims and jews that have naturalized to the U.S.A. have renounced their allegiance to their Homelands.
Is there anyone here that believes that.
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,138
15 Feb 2019 #168
How about you Rich, have you promised to take up arms against America's enemies ?

Yes. And I wasn't going to play the second president of the United States and decide which wars were good and just and which were not. I actually had to register with the Selective Service in 1967.

This would mean that all the Muslims and jews that have naturalized to the U.S.A. have renounced their allegiance to their Homelands.

Great point. It shows how naive and stupid the US government is. Just google Kissinger and you will see the bottom of the American stupidity real fast.


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