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Chicago's 1.1 million Polish Americans celebrated Constitution Day


guesswho 4 | 1,289
9 May 2011 #31
These folks are celebrating their roots, not their citizenship.

very true. Two different things. Everyone does it, not just the Polish-Americans.
BBman - | 344
9 May 2011 #32
Ah wait, it's just too damn difficult to get, isn't it?

It's not difficult. Polish-Americans don't need polish passports. There's nothing stopping them from travelling to see their families on their US passports so why bother getting the passport?

Poles living in the former USSR "risk persecution" to get the karta polaka because many of them want to move (difficult process) to Poland to improve their lives.
Babinich 1 | 455
9 May 2011 #33
The Poles are more spread out and more live in the 'burbs than in Chicago proper.

Lemont...
ZIMMY 6 | 1,601
9 May 2011 #34
Ah Lemont; I never got a good golf score at Cog Hill. I'm referring to the infamous "Dubsdread" course number 4.
The downtown section of the town is nicely quaint. Turn of the century (20th) buildings and earlier. Haven't been there in years though.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
9 May 2011 #35
Polish-Americans don't need polish passports

Anyone with any sort of patriotism would want to be a citizen of their homeland. It really is that simple - of course, being a Polish citizen brings obligations, and we just can't have that, can we?

As I've said countless times - they like to be Polish when it suits them, but when it comes to actually doing anything for Poland, they run away and ignore it. All this nonsense about identifying as Polish - sorry, but it's utter nonsense. As I asked above - how many of them complied with their obligations under Article XI of the May 3rd constitution?

Heck, I wonder how many of them even know what Article XI even is? Or is it just a case of celebrating a day that they really know nothing about? I mean, it's highly unlikely any of them actually know why some nobles opposed the constitution, isn't it?

Then again - given the peasant origins of those Polacks, it's no surprise that they celebrate it.

Poles living in the former USSR "risk persecution" to get the karta polaka because many of them want to move (difficult process) to Poland to improve their lives.

Many of them don't actually want to move - they like where they are. Many of them don't actually speak Polish too well - and they would always be identified by Poles in Poland as being "Russian" or suchlike. But still, they try all the same.
MediaWatch 10 | 945
10 May 2011 #36
Anyone with any sort of patriotism would want to be a citizen of their homeland.

But if they are born in America, shouldn't they be patriotic to America since that's where most Polish Americans are born? So should German Americans be first patriotic to Germany and not America since they are of German ancestry????

It really is that simple - of course, being a Polish citizen brings obligations, and we just can't have that, can we?

An anti-Polish troll like you is the last person to pass judgement on people of Polish ancestry.

A person's obligation, is to the country they live in first and foremost. Not the country of their ancestral origin.

With your twisted logic, that means Irish-American, Italian American, German American and Russian Americans can't celebrate their ethnic roots without going back to their ancestral homeland. What a moron you are.

This isn't about ethnic Americans being patriotic toward their ancestral homeland. Its about them celebrating their ethnic origin. How big of a moron are you not to understand the difference? You always look for these nit picking issues to attack people of Polish ancestry.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
10 May 2011 #37
Anyone with any sort of patriotism would want to be a citizen of their homeland.

I agree. I think Dope should go wherever it is he came from.

Imo, people should take a civics test before they're allowed to vote. I know many non-citizens who are smarter and more aware of what's going on in the country than born citizens. Obviously, taking a test wouldn't fly either here or in Poland. (Just like people should be required to take an IQ test before they're given a driver's license... Not happening, either.)

If people go through the trouble of casting their absentee votes, it means they care enough. It really doesn't matter that they vote differently than people residing in the actual country in question (or that they vote differently than Dope would - in fact, it only shows how smart they are) - maybe they see and understand some things that only leaving the country lets you do?
sledz 23 | 2,250
10 May 2011 #38
A sea of red and white dominated Chicago's Grant Park Saturday as the city's large Polish American population celebrated Polish Constitution Day

Nice Thread PennBoy, its too bad the Europeans on here gang up and try to discredit it. They did to me in the past when I went there and took pics of the parade, as well as The Taste of Polonia

They can forget about me ever doing that again:(

The Europeans on this forum talk such nonsense, unlike like the Poles Ive met Chicago, thats for sure!!
ShawnH 8 | 1,507
10 May 2011 #39
They can forget about me ever doing that again:(

And the forum is a lesser place because of it.

:-(
sledz 23 | 2,250
10 May 2011 #40
I dont see anything wrong with Polish or Irish Americans etc celebrating their heritage, its a real nice parade as well!
Everyone is friendly and having a great time. Ive never met any Polish person here yet that talked down about my country, they all seem to love it here!

Then you try and share it on the forum and they have to start slamming anything that is America.

Something is wrong with the Europeans on this site,,, Im thinking Jealousy??
ShawnH 8 | 1,507
10 May 2011 #41
Something is wrong with the Europeans on this site,,, Im thinking Jealousy??

I would modify that to include the word some before Europeans. There are some here who did/do/would appreciate that kind of post / thread / perspective. And then there is the crew that wouldn't. Too bad really.
Eurola 4 | 1,909
10 May 2011 #42
they like to be Polish when it suits them, but when it comes to actually doing anything for Poland, they run away and ignore it.

Delphia-Dope has so much to say about Polonia... instead, he should be talking about his Russki roots and be an expert in it. It's mind buggling that he can not be able to look in the mirror and assess his credentials. Living in Poland for a few years makes you an expert in NOTHING. Me, living in the US for 30+ years, makes me an expert and I can express my feelings about my Polishness and my US expertise. Going to Constitution Day parade or Taste of Polonia is one of them.So, put your face in a bucket of sh**t and hush. I will express my Polish roots just how I want it ant not how you think I should. Go and wave your commie Russian flag on October 17.


  • Bow to it
sledz 23 | 2,250
10 May 2011 #43
I would modify that to include the word some before Europeans

Yes, I dont mean all of the posters on here sry, but there are certainly a few.

Thanks for pointing that out:)
Eurola 4 | 1,909
10 May 2011 #44
"Some Europeans", "most Europeans", "All Europeans" - they wish they were Americans! :) Their obsession with America seems to point this way. No Americans are thinking this way. Quite the opposite.
Pinching Pete - | 558
10 May 2011 #45
"Some Europeans", "most Europeans", "All Europeans" - they wish they were Americans! :)

Ehh, don't know about that. A lot of Europeans are fascinated by America maybe. America has a lot of funny contradictions and it does spark a lot of imagination over in Europe. Get rich , Hollywood stuff. And conversely I know a quite a few Americans that live , eat sleep .. anything European. Europe and America both present interesting but very different options for someone. I've lived in Europe, some of it was overrated, dilapidated, humourless.. also some of it was amazing, beautiful, laid back, friendly. When you read a lot history and suddenly you're there where all these things actually took place and you can kind of feel all the centuries past. Now, that's quite a thing.
PolskiMoc 4 | 324
10 May 2011 #46
[quote=delphiandomine]Actually it can be good for Poles to move to the West get wealthy & come back later to Poland & build Poland up from the wealth acquired in the West.

Such is the case of with Krzysztof Olszewski the owner of Solaris Bus the inventor of the Hybrid Bus & they make top level bus that even Germany buy.

He left for Germany & He came back to Poland!

Just because someone lives in the West does not make them not Polish!

Actually Poles in America are not nearly as nationalistic to Poland as some other groups like Italian Americans & Irish Americans. Especially Italian Americans. 5th Generation Italian Americans still are extremely Italian oriented.

If anything Polish Americans should be more prideful. I live in New YOrk & So many people here wear Italian & irish pride things. So I wear sometimes Polish pride things.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
4 May 2016 #47
Merged: PolAm runs MarriageSavers campaign in the USA

We all know the typical arguments and grounds for divorce: alcohol abuse, poor breadwinner unable to proivde the Mrs with the lifestyle she was accusotmed to, the wife left the old man and ran away with a handsome lifeguard, the old man ran off with a cocktail waitress half his age, etc., etc. "Everybody should have the right to abandon their family and start all over," the pro-divorce contingent claim. One group in Michigan are working to save troubled marriages. Among other things they have compiled the following data worth thinking about:

"Fault Divorce is unconstitutional. Both the 5th and 14th Amendments of the US Constitution guarantee that "no person be deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law." However, I asked, "When every divorce is granted, how is there `due process of law?'

"And divorced people ARE deprived of life, liberty and property. A divorced woman lives 4 years less than a married woman; a divorced husband, 10 years less and their kids, 5 years shorter lives. Typically, a father can only see his kids two weekends a month - depriving him and his kids of liberty. And creating two households on the same income as one, deprives both of property."


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