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What do Polish people think about Wales and Welsh people?


welshguyinpola 23 | 465    
24 Oct 2008  #91
As a boy from the Welsh valleys I can say that I used to wake up every day surrounded by beautiful scenery and to birdsong. And that is wales in its entirity, green, hilly and full of song.

I remeber when the Welsh coal mines were still running, the pit head in amongst all the mountains..... Lovely
megk22 - | 2    
23 Feb 2009  #92
I would like to ask a Welshman for a favour. I really need to take an interview with someone who has something to do with the Welsh culture, language, customs and traditions of any kind. To put it short I need to talk to a Welsh person. I would be very grateful for any help. :)
pawian 126 | 6,545    
23 Feb 2009  #93
Just to start off, I like Wales.

Walesa is OK. As ymbol.
megk22 - | 2    
23 Feb 2009  #94
It is all incredulous what I read here. You do not know nothing about Wales and dare to speak about it as if you were an expert. The Welsh have their own distinct language, traditions, and most of all the sense of nationality. Those of you who write that this is a part of England please read sth about Wales before you write anthing like this once more. Sht to think about- england takes more from Wales than the other way round. Think for a moment why they do not want to give them a state? Because they would lost more than they have as their own.
pawian 126 | 6,545    
23 Feb 2009  #95
Think for a moment why they do not want to give them a state? Because they would lost more than they have as their own.

No.
After losing the States, Australia, India, half Africa, half the world, the British finally said: Stop! No more concessions!

And they still stick to poor Wales.
Trevek 26 | 1,703    
24 Feb 2009  #96
The countryside is fantastic. I like the way they've revitalised the language. The cheese is good too.

Shame they have a habit of supplying central heating to incomers' homes :D
welshguyinpola 23 | 465    
24 Feb 2009  #97
Shame they have a habit of supplying central heating to incomers' homes :D

I dont understand what u mean here.

Welsh people are passionate about everything, especially rugby. We have our own sense of identity and are fiercely patriotic.

The people of the Welsh Valleys went through an incredibly difficult time when all the mines closed, it made us stronger and our sense of community is fantastic. How amny English people can say they truly can rely on their neigbours let alone a whole community
McCoy 27 | 1,283    
24 Feb 2009  #98
Welsh people are passionate about everything, especially rugby. We have our own sense of identity and are fiercely patriotic. The people of the Welsh Valleys went through an incredibly difficult time when all the mines closed, it made us stronger and our sense of community is fantastic.

these welsh must be the coolest nation in the world!

PS: open the mines, you ( english?) bastards!
Trevek 26 | 1,703    
24 Feb 2009  #99
I dont understand what u mean here.

It's a little joke from the time the Sons of Glendower were torching English holiday cottages. There was an advert on TV at th time for coal central heating "Come home to a real fire". The "Not the 9 O'clock News" team (Rowan Atkinson, Mel Smith et al) did a parody... "Come home to a real fire... buy a cottage in Wales".

I understand what you mean about the mines closing etc. My mothers side of the family are from Tyneside and my aunt was living in a mining village during and after the miners' strike. It wasn't just the Welsh Valleys which suffered. I grew up in Shropshire. The area around thre used to be full of mines. None now tho'.

I admire Welsh cultural patriotism. What does bug me is when it is just used as an excuse for anti-Englishness rather than promoting the positive aspects of Wales and welshness (same with any patriotism, really).
wildrover 98 | 4,457    
18 Jan 2010  #100
Nobody likes Wales do they , other than the Welsh that is...? Even god makes it rain on them all the time...!
BrutalButcher - | 392    
18 Jan 2010  #101
I only hate Wales because of Bullet for my valentine.Man, do they suck!!
KateP - | 1    
22 Mar 2010  #102
lol couldn't agree more!
Welsh2theEnd    
9 Mar 2011  #103
The sheep obsession was a hoax made up by either the polish or the english people to try to make us look stupid. Didn't work.
Daisy 3 | 1,229    
9 Mar 2011  #104
You're wanted on the maternity ward

checkitlive.com/camera/1112
isthatu2 4 | 2,710    
9 Mar 2011  #105
You're wanted on the maternity ward

lol....or should that be lloll...really,posting links to soft 0orn....tsk...and too late for St Davids day......
RobertJones    
18 Jun 2011  #106
this is because so many of them move to wales! they say in welshpool your more likely to hear some one talking polish than talking welsh!
isthatu2 4 | 2,710    
18 Jun 2011  #107
they say in welshpool your more likely to hear some one talking polish than talking welsh!

How can you tell? It all sounds like a cat coughing up a furball........apart from that ultra sonic screech of Polish women between words.....
Lyzko    
18 Jun 2011  #108
How close is John Llewelyn's "How Green Was My Valley" to the real Wales?? Are Angharad and Bronwyn still popular Cymraeic names for girls or has the whole country irreparably Anglicized?
poland_    
18 Jun 2011  #109
england takes more from Wales than the other way round

I think tax payers in England have been sponsoring the Welsh for some time. Not to take anything away from Wales it is a very nice part of the world. Most Welsh people I have met are good sorts. I don't know wether I would trust one wearing wellies on a dark night though.
isthatu2 4 | 2,710    
21 Jun 2011  #110
How close is John Llewelyn's "How Green Was My Valley" to the real Wales??

How close is " A Tree grows in Brooklyn" to life in the New York these days????
Life in wales is fine these days as long as you avoid the forays from Harlech castle by roving bands of English knights and men at arms harrying the countryside............................
Lyzko    
21 Jun 2011  #111
Good point, although I think Ms. Smith saw American life changing just a wee bit faster than Mr. Llewelyn perceived the changes to Welsh life.

The lot of the miner has changed somewhat, but, at least in America, it's a hard lot indeed-:)
isthatu2 4 | 2,710    
21 Jun 2011  #112
The main point there being, re Wales today is, Miners,what miners? :(
Its a lovely place,going through some big changes,well worth a visit .
Havok 10 | 912    
22 Jun 2011  #113
What do you think about Wales and Welsh people?

Only a Polish person would ask this questions. LMAO

I'm sure Welsh don't give a siht what anyone thinks about them. They just go about their Welsh business.

When are you Polacks going to learn to shake that chip off your shoulder? Hmm? Stop caring what people think about you and just be yourfockingselves.
saesneg    
22 Jun 2011  #114
Are Angharad and Bronwyn still popular Cymraeic names for girls or has the whole country irreparably Anglicized?

Angharad is popular yes. Bet you can't say it though..:)

I don't know wether I would trust one wearing wellies on a dark night though.

What are u a sheep?
Lyzko    
22 Jun 2011  #115
Saesneg, compared with Polish, I find Celtic languages such as Cymrae and Gaelic to be quite "unphonetic". For instance, I tried pronouncing "Erin go bragh!", "Failte!" and "Slante!" during a St. Paddie's bash at the Irish Cultural Centre near where we live. Stone cold sober all of us, at the start of the evening's festivities anyway, my Irish-born colleagues broke into resounding gales of laughter at my attempts to pronounce their language. About the only thing I got right was "Siobbhan" (Shuhvawn) and "Padraig" (Paawhdrik) and that was about it.

"Llewelyn" I was told sounds sort of like "Jewwell'n" when a double "Ll -" sounds pops up-:) Reminds me a bit of certain Spanish pronuncations of "eLLa", "LLodra" etc...
saesneg    
22 Jun 2011  #116
"Llewelyn" I was told sounds sort of like "Jewwell'n" when a double "Ll -" sounds pops up-:) Reminds me a bit of certain Spanish pronuncations of "eLLa", "LLodra" etc...

hmmm...the double LL is more like an English L, but instead of removing your tongue from your top inside gum to make the sound, leave it there and blow air through it...

Cymraeg is surprisingly phonetic, certainly compared to English anyway, in that the same letter combinations are pronounced the same way every time.
Lyzko    
22 Jun 2011  #117
Interesting, Saesneg! -:)

Well, I guess that Cymrae (notice I don't call it "Welsh", as I've been told that's disrespectful!!) is more phonetic than Irish. It seems that NO letters are pronounced as they appear written to an non-Gaelic speaker!

I first fell in love with the Cymrae(-ic) language and culture when I discovered Dylan Thomas and Emlyn Williams as a high school student! Thomas wrote of course in breathtakingly beautiful English, yet one always sensed some underpinning of his Welsh ancestral tongue-:) Richard Burton changed his name from Something-something Jones, as did Ray Milland and many other successful Welshmen who made it big in the world.

The longest river name in the world is Welsh too, I believe-:) Hungarian though lays claim to longest European place name LOL
isthatu2 4 | 2,710    
23 Jun 2011  #118
Im guessing you are or speak Polish Lyzko? The double LL seems to this non welsh speaker to be closest to the Polish "ch" sound,which funnily enough is how us Scots pronounce "Loch" ,ie,as though it was a Polish word ,like the russian pronunciation of Chleb ;)
blanka    
23 Jun 2011  #119
"Loch" ,ie,as though it was a Polish word

There is even such word in Polish and it means 'dungeon'
Des Essientes 7 | 1,296    
23 Jun 2011  #120
"ch" sound,which funnily enough is how us Scots pronounce "Loch" ,ie,as though it was a Polish word

"Loch" was used as the example in a phonetic guide for pronouncing the Polish "ch" within the names of the characters in an English translation of Sienkiewicz's trilogy.



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