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Polish immigrants in the UK - the next generation


gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #31
We are talking about Poles travelling and not British or Irish Citizens.

So Stena at Belfast would let a Pole sail to the UK without ID? I really dont think so... You really dont know uk history. Up until 5-6 years ago the IRA ran terrorist cells in mainland UK and therefore security at all UK ports has always been tight. UK isn't Poland we are seen as a country to 'have a go' at unlike little Poland.
Barney 15 | 1,476
15 Jun 2012 #32
We are talking about Poles travelling and not British or Irish Citizens.

I live in Belfast and he is correct.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2012 #34
So Stena at Belfast would let a Pole sail to the UK without ID? I really dont think so.

They don't check ID on CTA journeys - why would they, when they're sailing within the Common Travel Area - which is essentially a mini-Schengen?

Furthermore, why would Stena Line check identification on an internal UK ferry?

You really dont know uk history. Up until 5-6 years ago the IRA ran terrorist cells in mainland UK and therefore security at all UK ports has always been tight.

And yet there was never an obligation to carry valid identification.

Don't you think that perhaps, the British in Northern Ireland would have an absolute fit if someone demanded ID from them to travel within their own country?
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #36
Furthermore, why would Stena Line check identification on an internal UK ferry?

They ask for ID because as you prove not everybody is a UK citizen. We still have the passport controls on all borders. The same as airlines.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2012 #37
What part of "They do not ask for ID on internal UK journeys" are you struggling to understand? Barney's already told you that you're not right - and he lives in Belfast. I'd expect him to know a thing or two about NI-GB travel!

There is no passport control on the Irish border. In fact, there never was - even from the start of the Free State, the border always remained free from immigration checks. Even during the worst of The Troubles, there was never a formal immigration check on the Irish border.

(Barney - I know about the checkpoints - but they weren't formal immigration checks as such)
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #38
Well as a UK national i've always been asked for ID when travelling on ferries and planes out of the mainland. You don't have to tell me anything about irish-uk relations as i dont have to preach about german-polish relations to you. There was spot checks at all ports and border crossings during the troubles... always was.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2012 #39
Well as a UK national i've always been asked for ID when travelling on ferries and planes out of the mainland.

Policy varies by carrier, as well as route. For instance, low-cost airlines will ask for ID as a revenue protection system. Then it depends on where the controls are - quite normal with the juxtaposed controls at Dover to leave the UK without any identification check whatsoever.

There was spot checks at all ports and border crossings during the troubles... always was.

Spot checks still did not involve the mandatory carrying of identification. While it might mean that Special Branch would take their time with you in the absence of ID, there was still (and is still no) compulsion to actually carry some when travelling to Great Britain on an internal UK journey.

Also worth pointing out that Advance Passenger Information is not required when travelling from the UK to Ireland.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #40
Also worth pointing out that Advance Passenger Information is not required when travelling from the UK to Ireland.

Never. I'm glad you pointed that out. Find me a carrier's website between Northern island and the UK where they say that non irish and british citizens don't need id?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2012 #41
With pleasure.

poferries.com/tourist/content/pages/template/_footer_other_terms_&_conditions_terms_&_conditions.htm

Section 6 - your responsibilities.

(i) Travel documentation for each individual passenger (including children and infants), valid beyond the date of return, is required for all trips to and outside the United Kingdom. Photographic identification must be carried and shown when required for all trips between Dublin and Liverpool.

That makes it crystal clear that photographic identification is *not* required on internal UK journeys. As I keep saying, the Northern Irish would have a fit if they were expected to identify themselves on internal UK journeys!

Barney's already told you that I'm 100% correct - why keep arguing?

But - just to put the icing on the cake. Who asks you for identification when you buy a bus ticket from Belfast to Edinburgh?
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #42
Photographic identification must be carried and shown when required for all trips between Dublin and Liverpool.

Bus trip? really does the bus float?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2012 #43
You're just showing your total ignorance as to NI-GB travel.
Barney 15 | 1,476
15 Jun 2012 #44
Even during the worst of The Troubles, there was never a formal immigration check on the Irish border.

Correct

Last summer one of my Polish friends went to Edinburgh by Motorbike and back the same day just for a jaunt no checks nothing, you dont need ID to go to Britain from Ireland.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #45
Last summer one of my Polish friends went to Edinburgh by Motorbike and back the same day just for a jaunt no checks nothing, you dont need ID to go to Britain from Ireland

did he not travel by ferry?
Barney 15 | 1,476
15 Jun 2012 #46
did he not travel by ferry?

Of course he did that was the point of posting that fascinating story to demonstrate that you dont need ID to get on the ferry.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #47
so he's lucky he didn't get stopped... probably didn't have his license on him?
Barney 15 | 1,476
15 Jun 2012 #48
No there are as many checks as there would be on a bus trip from London to Manchester.

Why do you assume he wouldnt have his license on him?
The guy is very well read, well educated, speaks several languages etc his only fault is that he doesn't drink.

You are wrong here.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #49
Why do you assume he wouldnt have his license on him?
The guy is very well read, well educated, speaks several languages etc his only fault is that he doesn't drink.

just checking....like the police would do.
Barney 15 | 1,476
15 Jun 2012 #50
You are wrong on every level here so decided to throw a slur.

Get over yourself
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
15 Jun 2012 #51
No i'm not Poles cant live in the UK with having registered somewhere,,,be it at the airport, the local goverment, the tax office... end of

No i'm not Poles cant live in the UK with having registered somewhere,,,be it at the airport, the local goverment, the tax office... end of

rte.ie/news/2011/1220/border.html

You'll find that the UK and the Irish government share border information.
Barney 15 | 1,476
15 Jun 2012 #52
You'll find that the UK and the Irish government share border information.

Well you are persistent but still incorrect.

Did you read that link?

This initiative is aimed at putting in place standard entry requirements and enhanced electronic border systems;

Meaning that there are none at the moment and never have been any.

In a statement the governments said the deal would prevent abuses of the Common Travel Area arrangement while protecting its benefits to trade and tourism, and will target what are termed ''high-risk'' countries for bogus asylum claims.

Polish people are not illegal in Ireland or Britain, meaning that they can wander around as they like.

Now you were wrong and are still wrong.

I would stop grasping at straws if I were you

Amadan
teflcat 5 | 1,032
15 Jun 2012 #53
Poland lost an idiot when you escaped to the civilised world!

I've been following this with some amusement. gdyniaguy, you are making yourself look silly. Insults don't make you look any better.
Avalon 4 | 1,068
15 Jun 2012 #55
IF YOU TRAVEL TO THE UK...EVEN IF YOU ARE POLISH. THE GOVERNMENT WILL HAVE YOUR PASSPORT DETAILS AND THE DATES OF ENTRY AND EXIT FROM THE UK/IRELAND. YOU CANT ENTER THE UK WITHOUT THE GOVERNMENT KNOWING....DO YOU UNDERSTAND!!!!!

He told MPs he did not "have the faintest idea" how many illegal immigrants there were in the UK, although he was aware of estimates suggesting the number of illegal immigrants was about 400,000.

news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/4985744.stm
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2012 #56
You'll find that the UK and the Irish government share border information.

They don't. They should, given that both are sovereign states and operating a mini-Schengen - but they don't.

:IF YOU TRAVEL TO THE UK...EVEN IF YOU ARE POLISH. THE GOVERNMENT WILL HAVE YOUR PASSPORT DETAILS AND THE DATES OF ENTRY AND EXIT FROM THE UK/IRELAND. YOU CANT ENTER THE UK WITHOUT THE GOVERNMENT KNOWING....DO YOU UNDERSTAND!!!!!

Totally grasping at straws now. Anyone who has actually ever flown to Ireland from an EU country will know that they tend to wave people through quite frequently unless you look interesting. No API, nothing.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
15 Jun 2012 #57
gdyniaguy: IF YOU TRAVEL TO THE UK...EVEN IF YOU ARE POLISH. THE GOVERNMENT WILL HAVE YOUR PASSPORT DETAILS AND THE DATES OF ENTRY AND EXIT FROM THE UK/IRELAND. YOU CANT ENTER THE UK WITHOUT THE GOVERNMENT KNOWING....DO YOU UNDERSTAND!!!!!

1- They dont scan the passports of anyone who enters the country. Non EU citizens who wish to stay for longer than 90 days must register with the GNIB at Burgh Quay. Not at the airport.

2- Ireland doesnt do exit checks. Are you an American and presuming every other country operates American immigration procedures?

3- You are assuming that the Irish government actually has a clue as to how many people are in the country. They still think that less than 5,000,000 people live in the country even though there are 8,000,000 active PPS numbers!

4- UK border police and the GNIB do undertake irregular spot checks on IRE-NI border and on some ferry crossings. But if you are white and english speaking the chances of them wanting to talk to you in any great detail are slim to none.
milky 13 | 1,657
15 Jun 2012 #58
number of poles in the UK (after a lot of them had returned to Poland)?

well the woman in the article said

“I live here, work here and have bought a house here,” says 31-year-old Magdalena Grodzka, a translator in a state hospital who has lived in London for seven years with her husband and one-year-old child. “Like many of our friends we have achieved a status where we are now able to afford to bring up a child.”

"Some" Poles may be leaving the UK and Ireland,but they are not necessarily returning to Poland.
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
18 Jun 2012 #59
They dont scan the passports of anyone who enters the country. Non EU citizens who wish to stay for longer than 90 days must register with the GNIB at Burgh Quay. Not at the airport

I presume the airlines who take Poles to Ireland don't scan the passports on checkin? I suppose Ryanair, Wizzair etc don't as for passport and visa details?. I'm not american but i know first hand how airlines work and the government who are furnished with Passport and Visa details.

"Some" Poles may be leaving the UK and Ireland,but they are not necessarily returning to Poland.

Me and my previous girlfriend in the UK lived together for 6 years and had medium income. We lived in a cheaper part of the UK then London and probably brought in the same if not more then the translator woman. She must be coining-in the benefits to be able to buy a house and bring up a child in London.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
18 Jun 2012 #60
Why do you keep arguing your point when it's already been shown to you beyond a doubt that it's perfectly possible for someone from Poland to live in the UK, totally under the radar? RN and Barney actually live on that island and know what they're talking about when it comes to this sort of thing.

Ryanair/Wizzair/etc don't take passport data for Irish flights. Why would they, when API isn't required by Ireland? And Ryanair/wizzair/etc certainly don't scan passports - they scan boarding passes.

If you "knew first hand", you'd know that the UK border is wide open for EU nationals. The Republic of Ireland aren't going to enforce UK immigration rules, though they will question people who look likely to head straight to the UK.

Or is "first hand' slang for "I once shagged a stewardess"?


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