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Poland in photo riddles


Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
14 Mar 2019  #2,161
In what kind of places can you see such decorations in Poland?

Topiary gardens in parks, palaces, castles etc? Let me guess, you want to know exactly where your picture is............
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
14 Mar 2019  #2,162
My guess - some former Jewish site, either a cemetery or something else....
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
14 Mar 2019  #2,163
Topiary gardens in parks, palaces, castles etc? Let me guess, you want to know exactly where your picture is......

Exactly is not necessary. It is enough you keep to general categories, like topiary parks, but different of course.

My guess - some former Jewish site, either a cemetery or something else...

Sorry, no.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
15 Mar 2019  #2,164
but different of course.

Botanical gardens in Kraków?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
15 Mar 2019  #2,165
Nope, the Botanical Garden is ethnically, religiously and ideologically neutral. :) Sth closer to Jews..... A hint - how are Jews called by Christians/ Catholics?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
16 Mar 2019  #2,166
On this forum that is a loaded question ;)

I don't know Pawian. I expected Maf's answer to be right as that piece of topiary looks to represent the Menorah, so I was thinking somewhere in Kazimierz, but you have already ruled out Jewish sites.
kaprys 1 | 1,376    
16 Mar 2019  #2,167
I'm Polish and some of these riddles are diffiicult for me, too.
As for the word used to call Jews, apart from żyd, I'd say starozakonny. So is it some sort of a monastery/convent? But why put the menorah there?

There are also the so-called ogrody biblijne, so perhaps it's one of them.
Dirk diggler 8 | 4,064    :-(
16 Mar 2019  #2,168
Parch or plural parchy ive also heard to describe Jews. It is a sort of disease that cats get.

Also have heard garbate nosy



OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  16 Mar 2019  #2,169
On this forum that is a loaded question ;)

haha I forgot about that, my fault.. :):)
No, I meant true Christians/ Catholics, not mock ones. How do we sometimes call Jews? And the post above reminds of a Polish proverb : strike the table and the scissors will sound. :)

that piece of topiary looks to represent the Menorah,

Of course it does. I say again - it is connected with Jewish topics. Another hint - but the ones which became more universal.

There are also the so-called ogrody biblijne, so perhaps it's one of them.

BINGO! A few dozen biblical gardens function in Poland:):) And Jews are sometimes called elder brothers in faith.

Where can you see such displays?



delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
16 Mar 2019  #2,170
Looks like a cupboard in the local urząd gminy, but what do I know? ;)
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
16 Mar 2019  #2,171
Sorry, those local county/borrough halls don`t have such cup displays. :) What for?
delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
16 Mar 2019  #2,172
I don't know, best moustache in local government perhaps? ;)

No, seriously speaking, isn't that just a display of trophies that were won by pupils in school?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
16 Mar 2019  #2,173
Yes! Bulls` aye! :) But why did you say pupils? I cope with students.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
16 Mar 2019  #2,174
What age / grade do you teach? and which standard do you tend toward UK or US?

The word pupil is a _lot_ more used in the UK than in the US (where student has almost completely replaced it, even for kindergarten).
delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
16 Mar 2019  #2,175
But why did you say pupils? I cope with students.

Students are only at universities in my opinion, though there's a move in England towards calling secondary school kids students as well. From what I can gather, the use of "students" originates in the grand old schools like Eton, which is possibly one reason why American English uses it so widely?

In Scotland, pupils is normal for both primary and secondary schools. So, blame my education ;)
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
16 Mar 2019  #2,176
which is possibly one reason why American English uses it so widely?

No I think it's more about historical mistrust of credentialism and/or 'experts'. If you're enrolled in a learning institution you're a student regardless of level or prestige. for the same reason the word 'study' refers not only to formal degree programs but informal programs or any kind of vaguely systematic learning...
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
16 Mar 2019  #2,177
In Scotland, pupils is normal for both primary and secondary schools. So, blame my education ;)

What? After decades of admonishing my students they are students, I should tell them they are pupils? No way! :)

What age / grade do you teach? and which standard do you tend toward UK or US?

To answer your two questions, two photos at a time:

What are the occassions?





OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  17 Mar 2019  #2,178
I'm Polish and some of these riddles are diffiicult for me, too.

Sorry, guys, I am doing it for your good, so please, don`t get vexed. :)

When these small packets of neurotransmitter are released at elevated rates, they help stimulate growth of new connections, known as boutons, between the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. This makes the postsynaptic neuron even more responsive to any future communication from the presynaptic neuron."Typically you have 70 or so of these boutons per cell, but if you stimulate the presynaptic cell you can grow new boutons very acutely. It will double the number of synapses that are formed," Littleton says.

news.mit.edu/2015/brain-strengthen-connections-between-neurons-1118
delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
17 Mar 2019  #2,179
What are the occassions?

The first one, I've never seen before. Some sort of pasowanie na gimnazjalistę, perhaps?

Second one looks like a cake to celebrate 20 years of teaching English, either in the school or for the teacher.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
17 Mar 2019  #2,180
Well, pasowanie is close. And 20 years of special English.
delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
  17 Mar 2019  #2,181
Aha, 20 years of bilingual classes?

Well, pasowanie is close.

Grr, what could it be? A graduation ceremony?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
17 Mar 2019  #2,182
Yes, bilingual classes.
Not final, but an initial ceremony. They hold similar ones in the USA.



Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
17 Mar 2019  #2,183
the post above reminds of a Polish proverb : strike the table and the scissors will sound. :)

Haha yes. The equivalent English meaning would be ' the lady doth protest too much', although of course we are not talking about a lady ;)
I would not have got the biblical gardens though, as I didn't know they even existed. Well done to Kaprys!
delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
17 Mar 2019  #2,184
I would not have got the biblical gardens though, as I didn't know they even existed.

You haven't seen the awful JPII one? ;)

google.com/maps/place/Garden+of+John+Paul+II/@49.8693514,19.4016929,1013m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x47168586d2964be9:0xbe02daa960384a0c!8m2!3d49.869348!4d19.406057

It's a huge tourist trap and moneyspinner. The guy who owns it has made a fortune from pilgrimages!
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
17 Mar 2019  #2,185
the awful JPII one? ;)

That is dire. And people actually pay good money to go and see it! If his face could talk, it would be saying, " I'm so fed up with all this sh1t " ;)
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
17 Mar 2019  #2,186
20 years of special English.

Not VOA special English I hope! (torture for a native speaker to listen to though I realize it could be very helpful for learners at a certain level).

They hold similar ones in the USA.

I don't know why they're holding out their arms, but that looks more like the pledge of allegiance (which happens every day for 12 years, from elementary through high school). We put our hands over our hearts (though if you were wearing a uniform you were allowed to salute).
delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
17 Mar 2019  #2,187
the pledge of allegiance

Is it done in every school?
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
17 Mar 2019  #2,188
Not sure about this moment but it used to be standard operating procedure in every public school (where every single classroom has a flag).

Patriotic rituals were meant to help hold a population without much in common (racially, ethnically, religiously) together. Language also helps serve that purpose (one reason that very uniform General American English exists (no equivalent in the UK AFAIK) that can be used by anyone regardless of region or class or ethno-racial background.
Shitonya Brits    
17 Mar 2019  #2,189
After decades of admonishing my students they are students

Teachers are commonly referred to now as "professional students."

Not because they are youth obsessed egalitarians who are seen and want to be seen as "being down with" young people of schooling age.

But rather because the term "professional student" acknowledges those with teaching jobs (for however long) lack of any real world experience.

google.com/maps

Yes, of course! If it weren't for Google Maps you would never experience Poland at all. :)
delphiandomine 86 | 17,376    
  17 Mar 2019  #2,190
Did someone fail school, perhaps?

It's such a shame that you don't participate in the spirit of this thread.


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