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Top Language Schools to Work for in Warsaw?


Pathfinder 1 | 2
16 May 2011 #1
Hello,

I am new to the forum and I'd really appreciate your comments/tips regarding the best language schools to work for in Warsaw.

I have just moved from the UK, where I studied an MA and worked as ESL/Spanish teacher the last four years. Any information on salaries, premises, working conditions, teaching methodologies, etc, etc. would be of great help.

Thanks in advance.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
16 May 2011 #2
I am new to the forum and I'd really appreciate your comments/tips regarding the best language schools to work for in Warsaw.

A cynic might suggest that there are no such things as best schools, only least-worst schools.
Harry
16 May 2011 #3
The best? Well that depends what your criteria are and who you want to be teaching.
OP Pathfinder 1 | 2
17 May 2011 #4
I see. Which are the least-worst schools then? Any suggestions?

Well that depends what your criteria are and who you want to be teaching

Well, I know I'm not going to get the same money as in England. I am aware of that. Let's say that I'd like to work for the language school that offers the best pay per hour. I have no problems teaching in companies, universities or language academies. I just don't want to teach in primary or secondary schools as most kids that age are not serious about learning languages.

Thanks.
Harry
17 May 2011 #5
Let's say that I'd like to work for the language school that offers the best pay per hour. I have no problems teaching in companies, universities or language academies.

Try ACT (Advanced Corporate Training), Lang LTC and Mike Mills. You could also try the British Council, they tend to pay the best but the environment there is certainly not for everybody. You could also try Cambridge school, they pay a little less than the other schools I mentioned but I can personally vouch for the management there.

I just don't want to teach in primary or secondary schools as most kids that age are not serious about learning languages.

If you don't want to teach secondary school aged kids, you're much less useful to schools.

Well, I know I'm not going to get the same money as in England

Actually you can: I had no problem charging 150zl (£30) for 90 minute lessons arranged privately or direct with a company. Cut out the middle man and your rates almost double.
OP Pathfinder 1 | 2
17 May 2011 #6
Thank you very much for all the info Harry. It will surely help me a great deal!!!
gary200481 3 | 15
10 Jan 2012 #7
[Moved from]: Angloschool (in Warsaw) - is it reputable?

Has anybody out there heard of this place-is it reputable,i cant face another dark dingy back-handed school again after my last two
pip 10 | 1,661
10 Jan 2012 #8
I worked there for a year in 1997-98. If you want more info send me a message- mind you this was also 12 years ago. I can give you info about the owners and some of the other staff if they are still there.
Nastya
24 Feb 2012 #9
I would propose this one Klub Dialogu
I had some good experiense in learning there.
And this is definately good. If you are interested, please contavt me and I will say everything I know and all experiense I had :)
Will be happy to help. Also I know some free conversation club
teflcat 5 | 1,032
24 Feb 2012 #10
try the British Council

They might try to offer a local contract, which is a little trick they sometimes use to save money. The BC tried this one on me in Prague years ago. If you go for it, insist on the same rate as a London-recruited teacher.

I had no problem charging 150zl (£30) for 90 minute lessons

This is the way to go once you've become established.

I just don't want to teach in primary or secondary schools

True enough, but teenagers who attend private courses tend to be more motivated.

Woops! Just noticed the dates.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
24 Feb 2012 #11
Woops! Just noticed the dates.

No worries about that, since the issue is still current.

Friends in EFL tell me the market has dried up a bit in Warsaw, with good schools and in-company training providers losing big contracts and unscrupulous schools like Polanglo offering 37zl per unit. Some blame it on a flood of younger, unqualified 'teachers' turning up to be with girlfriends, wives etc or just to study. These people just need to earn pin money and are easy meat for the worst schools. Others say that the core of the work in Warsaw, in-company lessons, are far fewer as companies tighten their training budgets and also recruit people who already have a high (or adequate) standard of lessons.
Pushbike 2 | 58
24 Feb 2012 #12
Some schools offer work purely as a native teacher and some as lead teachers.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
24 Feb 2012 #13
unscrupulous schools like Polanglo

Any connection to the bookshop of the same name?

Some blame it on a flood of younger, unqualified 'teachers' turning up to be with girlfriends, wives etc or just to study. These people just need to earn pin money and are easy meat for the worst schools.

That's what I'm seeing here in Poznan - a flood of unqualified people turning up and working for peanuts.

Others say that the core of the work in Warsaw, in-company lessons, are far fewer as companies tighten their training budgets and also recruit people who already have a high (or adequate) standard of lessons.

It's definitely the case here that being "known" is an asset, even if they don't know you personally.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
25 Feb 2012 #14
Any connection to the bookshop of the same name?

Dunno. I just know that they offered a friend (who is an very experienced teacher -high quality stuff, really) 37zl and were surprised when he refused.

That's what I'm seeing here in Poznan - a flood of unqualified people turning up and working for peanuts.

It's destroyed the market in so many other places - the question is, will the EFL market in Poland become closer to that of Spain or of Sweden.

Some schools offer work purely as a native teacher and some as lead teachers.

This is a bit of a scam. It enables schools to cover half the lessons with a poorly-paid Polish teacher and the other half with some random foreigner who doesn't need to have teaching skills. At the same time touting it as some sort of 'dual method' as if there was actually some real methodology rather than business strategy behind it.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
25 Feb 2012 #15
It's destroyed the market in so many other places - the question is, will the EFL market in Poland become closer to that of Spain or of Sweden.

I'd argue that Krakow (and to a lesser extent, Wroclaw) has already turned into Spain.

Same thing happened in Prague apparently - endless 'native speakers' looking for work, but barely any of them being able to actually put a lesson together.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
25 Feb 2012 #16
Same thing happened in Prague apparently - endless 'native speakers' looking for work, but barely any of them being able to actually put a lesson together.

Loads of them mostly from the US, living hand to mouth.

I agree with you about the Spain thing, but was wondering a moment ago if Polish EFL might go a bit like Italy. An oversupply in the beauty spots, the good jobs countrywide being done by people with a second income, the university/private school work being done by a mix of the posh and exchange students and the in-company work in industrial centres being the only half stuff money-wise and even that hard to get.
Pushbike 2 | 58
25 Feb 2012 #17
This is a bit of a scam

This is what I do. I teach the class 6 lessons every course. I am Celta qualified as are all the natives. The Polish teachers all have degree qualifications in philology. We can also teach as lead teachers and i do so on some business courses. We are regularly observed and given feed back. Rarely a teacher is asked to leave/leaves at the end of their contract if they are observed not to be teaching well. Students also grade their teachers.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
25 Feb 2012 #18
Which is more frequent, native or a non-native being a 'lead teacher'?

Students also grade their teachers.

This is pretty standard. Out of interest, who does the observations?
Pushbike 2 | 58
25 Feb 2012 #19
JonnyM
More frequent is a Polish lead teacher. In company it is more frequent native. Methodologists do the observations. I know it's standard but lots of schools don't do this. when I interviewed I was interviewed before having to teach a trial lesson. This isn't standard although it should be.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,769
25 Feb 2012 #20
What does a 20 square meter office rent for in Warsaw? I know of no teachers that have set up their own businesses who have anything but regret that they hadn't done it earlier.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
25 Feb 2012 #21
Methodologists do the observations

This always puzzles me - who are these methodologists that some schools use and isn't every qualified teacher a methodologist?

This isn't standard although it should be.

Agreed.
Pushbike 2 | 58
25 Feb 2012 #22
Methodologists are normally experienced teachers who are don't teach anymore. I suppose like a senior teacher.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
25 Feb 2012 #23
That sounds a bit like the work I do sometimes - mostly teacher training, school expections, examinations etc. Are the methodologists native speakers?
Pushbike 2 | 58
25 Feb 2012 #24
What is a school expection? Methodologists are not native but I am surprised with most of the teachers' lvel of English. I mistook 3 teachers as natives and was asking them where in the UK/states they were from.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
25 Feb 2012 #25
This always puzzles me - who are these methodologists that some schools use and isn't every qualified teacher a methodologist?

In my experience, a methodologist is someone who has sucked up enough to the owners in a small school, and someone who sucked up enough to the director in a chain school.

I had an amusing run-in with one who was adamant that "realize" was the only acceptable spelling of the word.

Are the methodologists native speakers?

No, and this is one of the big issues.
Nightglade 7 | 97
26 Feb 2012 #26
That's what I'm seeing here in Poznan - a flood of unqualified people turning up and working for peanuts.

Yes and sadly that's not the largest problem. It's reached that point whereby students (and in fact, schools) are shocked that tutors would dare ask for more than 40zł for an hour of their time. After all, why should they pay more when they can hire a fresh-faced "yeah, I can teech innit" sixth-form graduate for 20zł an hour to fund his nightly beer runs with his new Polish bird? Country life is looking more appetising :)
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
26 Feb 2012 #27
I can teech innit" sixth-form graduate for 20zł an hour to fund his nightly beer runs with his new Polish bird?

Like this clown - Living and working in Poznan. Looking for more students to tutor.

I wouldn't even call him "sixth-form" graduate!
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
26 Feb 2012 #28
This is one of the problems - a qualified teacher should be a methodologist anyway.

No, and this is one of the big issues.

A huge issue - aside from any matter of potential discrimination on the grounds of nationality, a competent and qualified native speaker teacher is likely to have a much better idea of how to do the job than some foreign 'methodologist'.

Country life is looking more appetising :)

Agreed. Such people perhaps need advice on heuristics, however they shouldn't be working at all. In Germany where the profession is unionised, they probably either wouldn't be working or would only be found in method schools.

expection?

Inspection!
Foreigner4 12 | 1,769
26 Feb 2012 #29
In my experience, a methodologist is someone who has sucked up enough to the owners in a small school, and someone who sucked up enough to the director in a chain school.

mine too, and overwhelmingly so:/

Related: Peritus and Direct-School - good to work in?

are these schools any good to work in?

Is Direct School a Callan place? With a name like that you would imagine so.
Rubyoptics 4 | 16
11 Jun 2013 #30
Merged: Advice on a language school to work in Warsaw area?

Hello all again, I have finally completed my move to Poland and spent a couple of days sending out my C.V to several language schools in and around the Warsaw area. After checking my emails today I was pleasantly suprised to see I have been invited to attend an interview with TFLS. I have looked around online further and have seen that a lot of student reviews are full of praise for both the school and the teachers, however I was wondering whether any of you had any experience teaching there or heard any good/bad things about it? I would love to hear you comments or views as the interview is in the next two days! Thanks in advance for any help you are able to give me!


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