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Looking for suitable English secondary school in Warsaw


yousif87 1 | 1    
12 Mar 2017  #1
Hi everybody
I'm looking for English Secondary School but not American or british schools because they are so expensive,
He's studying in Jordan now, but I want him to complete in Warsaw, Poland to get in the unversity there easly
Thank you
Regards.
mafketis 17 | 6,504    
12 Mar 2017  #2
I want him to complete in Warsaw, Poland to get in the unversity there easly

The only university education worth anything in Poland is taught in Polish, english language programs are small and not very good (to put it delicately).

So you'd want him to finish a Polish high school which is easier said than done if he doesn't already know Polish.

Why Poland?
jon357 65 | 13,874    
12 Mar 2017  #3
Hi Yousif,

These sites may be useful to you:
kopernik.edu.
josemarti.pl
ies.waw.pl/pl/edukacja.php
12lo.warszawa.pl/files/folderen.pdf

Good luck!
DominicB - | 2,623    
13 Mar 2017  #4
I want him to complete in Warsaw, Poland to get in the unversity there easly

If he doesn't speak fluent Polish, then there is no point in going to university in Poland. The courses taught in English are almost all a total joke, and the degree is worthless. It's a complete waste of time and money. The only programs worth taking in Poland are in Polish language only, and Polish is a very difficult language that takes many years to learn,
jon357 65 | 13,874    
13 Mar 2017  #5
I'm sure Yousif is capable of weighing up the various issues and options.
OP yousif87 1 | 1    
14 Mar 2017  #6
Thanks Guys for your helping
Kind Regards
Nathans    
14 Mar 2017  #7
Why are the courses taught in English a total joke - is it mostly due to the poor English skills of professors or poor educational level of universities in Poland?
mafketis 17 | 6,504    
14 Mar 2017  #8
Why are the courses taught in English a total joke

More than one reason

mostly due to the poor English skills of professors

That's a big part of it (and also true in western Europe, even in places like the Netherlands and Denmark) more often than not people teach better in their own language (or a second language in a place they live). Teaching in a foreign language is rarely going to work out very well and if the language in question is also foreign for the students....

poor educational level of universities in Poland?

Polish universities have pretty high quality at the undergraduate level, graduate studies mostly don't really exist, doctorate programs are more about guided research under a mentor than classes.
DominicB - | 2,623    
14 Mar 2017  #9
@Nathans

Like Maketis said, it's a complex situation.

More than anything, it has to do with the practicalities and purpose of these courses. Funding for education is very tight in Poland, and the lion's share of the funding, and the attention, go to full-time studies for Polish students in Polish-language courses. The English courses, with few exceptions, are designed primarily to raise cash for the university: cash that will be largely reallocated to those studying in full-time Polish-language courses and to Polish scholars doing their research (and for lining the pockets of select university administrators). This is cash with no strings attached, the holy grail of university administrators everywhere.

This means that little time, money and thought are spent of the English-language courses themselves. They are often organized and taught by lower-level instructors, and the resources they have for more practical aspects of the course are limited. This is particularly true for practical and laboratory classes in science and technology courses.

The second reason is that the target students do not really care about the quality of the degree they earn, rather than just earning a degree "in Europe", which, they believe, rightly or wrongly, will be more valuable than a degree from a good university elsewhere. A good part of these students are middle-class, spoiled, primarily Arab kids who are sent abroad by their parents for exposure to Western culture (the ultimate idea is that they will then be able to further their family's business ambitions abroad. The rich ones can send their kids to better, more expensive schools in the West. The schools in Poland and eastern Europe meet a market need for the less wealthy. Quality of education is not a primary concern of theirs.

A second group is Westerners who cannot gain admissions to better schools in the West, either because they have performed poorly in secondary schools, or because they cannot afford it. This is a mixed group, with some having serious academic ambitions, and others being hopeless slackers.

Then there are the students from the third-world countries, most of whom view studying in Poland as an easy way to enter the EU. They don't care in the least about the quality of education, as most abscond within a semester or two, after they figure out that there is no work for them in Poland.

So it is a combination of the students not caring about the quality of education, and the schools not caring about the quality of students, as long as they bring in cash.

Sadly, those students who do care about the quality of education basically get ripped off. It's sort of a scam. The universities promise their students that it is easy to find part-time work during their studies, and full-time employment afterward. The gullible, desperate and naive students fall for it, ending up stuck in the position of having to abandon a failed investment, or of chasing good money after bad. In either case, the university still makes out.

By the way, there are plenty of schools like this all over the developed world. I am ashamed to admit that, when I was in graduate school in San Diego, I used to work as an instructor at one of the "country club" schools for stinking rich Arabs and Japanese. A total waste of time, academics-wise, as the students didn't give a flying duck about biology or chemistry. But, for me, the pay was very enticing. The only job requirements were dependably showing up in suit and tie, and the ability to resist the strong urge to lose your cool and say that this was all a load of BS. A lot easier and more lucrative than writing "masters theses" for them, which is how I broke in.
jon357 65 | 13,874    
14 Mar 2017  #10
Anyone would think you were trying to deter him, Dominic, as you try to deter so many others who want to study in Poland. Yousif would do well to click on your profile and see the same thing repeated like a broken record.
DominicB - | 2,623    
14 Mar 2017  #11
Anyone would think you were trying to deter him

I am trying to deter him. As well I should, as studying in Poland is generally a very poor investment for foreign students. I take no pleasure in naive, desperate and gullible people being cheated of their savings and the best years of their lives.

like a broken record

Expecting a different answer to the same question is a hallmark of insanity.
mafketis 17 | 6,504    
14 Mar 2017  #12
you try to deter so many others who want to study in Poland

If anything he doesn't discourage enough. Poland is not a country for those who want a degree from an English language program and who will be unfit for the Polish labor market after graduation.
jon357 65 | 13,874    
14 Mar 2017  #13
Yet plenty of people choose to study abroad and can easily weigh up the various options.

a hallmark of insanity.

A bigger hallmark of insanity would be writing long screeds at least a hundred times in different threads here all saying much the same thing. It's as if you don't think foreign people should come here.
WhirlwindTobias - | 88    
14 Mar 2017  #14
Anyone would think you were trying to deter him, Dominic, as you try to deter so many others who want to study in Poland.

Does it really matter whether Dominic is deterring others or not? At the end of the day if you're convicted enough about your future plans you'll do them regardless of who encourages you or not.

A lot of fresh faces aren't even convicted enough to do their own research and browse the many sources out there made for expats which will answer their questions, nevermind continue pursuing education here when it turns out it's not as accessible/viable as the British, German or Swedish education system.
jon357 65 | 13,874    
14 Mar 2017  #15
At the end of the day if you're convicted enough about your future plans you'll do them regardless of who encourages you or not.

This is true, though in this particular case there is a lot of unwarranted negativity - Poland can be a great place to come and study and not everyone wants to do certain subjects - the world needs philosophers, historians, etc as well as mathematicians.
dhingra - | 1    
19 Jun 2018  #16
Merged:

School in Warsaw for family travelling from India with Work visa



I am doing some research on internet and find that there are only a couple of schools (like British School) in Warsaw for non-Polish families. I am travelling from India for work and plan to bring my family along. British school cost is way out of my budget - what are my options?
Sparks11 - | 337    
19 Jun 2018  #17
There are cheaper options than the"official" British and American schools. Check out The International American School (IAS) , Meridian, The International school on Ul. Jagielska. There are many more.


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