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Who still speaks pidigin Polish after many years in the country?



Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
19 Jun 2017  #1

people who claim to be

Can there be aynthing more laughable than someone trying to prove they are Polish when they haven't learnt to communicate in Polish properly after 22 years of constant exposure. That a person can be so enamoured of his boring, run-of-the-mill Anglo-jabber that in all these years he has yet to contribute a single post to PF's Po Polsku section.

And now your link (run to Google translate!)
wiadomosci.onet.pl/kraj/morawiecki-20-mld-zl-wiecej-z-podatkow/rjrlvwc

Będziemy mieli 20 mld zł więcej z podatków. (...) Pieniądze są przeznaczone na program 500 plus i na reformę emerytalną. Ministerstwo Finansów w tym roku odzyska z uszczelnienia systemu podatkowego tyle pieniędzy, ile rok temu wpłynęło z funduszy unijnych.



dolnoslask 2 | 1,152    
19 Jun 2017  #2

haven't learnt to communicate in Polish properly after 22 years

Well I was tempted to mention this while being hounded on another thread, how can someone feel that they can take up the high ground on all thing Polish when after 22 years in Poland they cannot pass a simple language test to get a passport.

Surely after all that time living and working with Polish people the language would rub off enough to pass a very simple test.

I can only assume that the person has no contact with the nation that he resides in , hence no leg to stand on when it comes to debate on Polish matters ,
delphiandomine 87 | 15,827    
19 Jun 2017  #3

how can someone feel that they can take up the high ground on all thing Polish when after 22 years in Poland they cannot pass a simple language test to get a passport.

Perhaps you should ask yourself why someone doesn't apply for one despite not even having to take a test in the language.
Harry 79 | 13,413    
19 Jun 2017  #4

they cannot pass a simple language test to get a passport.

There's more than a language test that needs to be passed. For a start there's the criminal records and background check. Personally I've got nothing to hide when it comes to that but clearly other people are far more worried. I can think of one particular person who will in two and a half years go into his seventh decade in Poland but still isn't Polish, because he can't pass all of the tests.

despite not even having to take a test in the language.

Isn't the test for everybody who wants to naturalise, whether they are married to a Pole or not?
dolnoslask 2 | 1,152    
19 Jun 2017  #5

someone doesn't apply for one

Maybe after years of living in Poland and still traveling and writing about Poland, family interest lies within the US, I can relate to that I had to take care of family before I was able to make my move.

On the otherhand some who live in Poland that purport to to be all things Polish, make no effort to learn the language or to fully integrate with social life here, they spend their days in expat bars speaking english , making assumptions over what is going on , no life really, I have seen this in many of the countries that I have worked in abroad, a very sad existance indeed.
dolnoslask 2 | 1,152    
19 Jun 2017  #6

Personally I've got nothing to hide

After twenty odd years why do you not speak fluent Polish are you taking lessons?

Jon managed to do it , I dont see the problem.
Harry 79 | 13,413    
19 Jun 2017  #7

family interest lies within the US

Nope, not in his case.

they spend their days in expat bars speaking english

I can't even remember the last time I was in an expat bar, possibly the year before last. There's no reason to go to any of them, they all have rubbish beer. Although I suppose some people are more interested in the effect of beer than the taste of it.
OP Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
19 Jun 2017  #8

the effect of beer than the taste of it

In your 50-beers-a-night lifestyle how many brews do you have to down before the taste buds are totally numbed beyond all ability to taste any difference?
delphiandomine 87 | 15,827    
19 Jun 2017  #9

Isn't the test for everybody who wants to naturalise, whether they are married to a Pole or not?

Not if it's by descent, which the person in question might be able to claim.
Harry 79 | 13,413    
19 Jun 2017  #10

the person in question might be able to claim.

Clearly he can't do that; if he could get one by descent, he wouldn't need to pass that tricky little check. People who are Polish by descent are born Polish and so don't need to take any tests, whether as to their language or morals. Also, if he was Polish by descent he wouldn't have surrender his precious American passport.

In your 50-beers-a-night lifestyle

I don't remember the last time I had even a fifth that many. There certainly wouldn't be any point in having even 0.05 litre glasses of that many beers, one's taste buds would be far too confused.

how many brews do you have to down before the taste buds are totally numbed beyond all ability to taste any difference?

Just one would be more than enough to kill my taste buds if it was that 7.2% "VIP" rot gut some people use to self medicate.
gregy741 3 | 1,008    
19 Jun 2017  #11

well,i been in the UK for like 15 years,and my english just stopped improving at some point.first 5 years was rapid and then last 5 years i feel like i didn't improve at all.i never went to school,and i been only learning by talking to people,thats why my grammar is non existent .but last few years there is no progress whatsoever anymore..brain gets slow with age i guess.
OP Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
19 Jun 2017  #12

7.2% "VIP"

Time and again PiSlamic earns his title of Liar Laureate. VIP lager is 4.2% ABV.
Background checks were run on all correspondentss. Check with IPN or the Interior Ministry if interested, and say "cześć" to good ol' Mariusz for me.

Pray tell us, PiSlamic, why yo have not applied for Polish citizenship?
jon357 70 | 12,786    
19 Jun 2017  #13

Anglo-jabber

Your native language.

Worth mentioning that I know a Polish lady who has lived in the UK since the war and hardly speaks a word of English, the language of Shakespeare, Milton and Woolf.

first 5 years was rapid and then last 5 years i feel like i didn't improve at all.i never went to school

This is normal enough - in fact you probably were improving; it's simply that you didn't feel it at the time.
OP Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
19 Jun 2017  #14

Your native language

So your suspension is over and you're back on the brit bully tag-team. That's good because your guru PiSlamic was getting the business from the PF's more decent posters.

Anyway you're wrong. Since my parents were busy setting up a new business (a pharmacy), I began life speaking Polish and was raised largely by four Poish-born grandparents who spoke very little English.

Maybe you know? As you well know, PiSlamic is busy sticking his big misshapen nose into other peoples business, homes, earnings and even citizenship. Perhaps you know why he hasn't applied for Polish citizenship althouhg he is constantly urgimng pothers to do. Can't pass the Polish language and culture test?
OP Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
19 Jun 2017  #15

the language of

The language of Jack the Ripper, Charles Manson, Harry, Hopkins (FDR's Soviet plant), the Rosenbergs, Lord Haw-Haw, Tokyo Rose and PiSlamic. Best to keep at least a barge-pole's lenght away.
OP Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
19 Jun 2017  #16

a fifth that many

Down to 10 beers a night, are we? Five litres ain't that much. You can probably even walk a straight line after such puny libation.
weg04    
19 Jun 2017  #17

The language of Jack the Ripper, Charles Manson, Harry, Hopkins (FDR's Soviet plant), the Rosenbergs, Lord Haw-Haw, Tokyo Rose and PiSlamic

And you
jon357 70 | 12,786    
19 Jun 2017  #18

Jack the Ripper, Charles Manson, Harry, Hopkins (FDR's Soviet plant), the Rosenbergs, Lord Haw-Haw, Tokyo Rose

Apart from your compatriot who is still in jail, did any of those produce literature?

Best to keep at least a barge-pole's lenght away.

Your frequent typos aside (the ones that become worse and more frequent as the day progresses), I wonder if anyone can see the irony of an erstwhile English-language amateur journalist writing that on an English-language forum in which he frequently posts.

So your suspension is over

What 'suspension' is that? Looks like you're seeing things that aren't there again, like armed attack dogs in pl. Zbawicela.
OP Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
20 Jun 2017  #19

pl. Zbawicela

Re typos - pot kettle.... As you know it is Plac Zbawiciela (pronounced roughly (zbah-vee-CHE-lah, not zbah-vee-TSE-lah).
Atch 12 | 1,746    
20 Jun 2017  #20

I'd say that 'zba-vee-CHEE-el-ah' would be more correct wouldn't it??
NoToForeigners 7 | 853    :-(
20 Jun 2017  #21

zba-vee-CHE-lah

but "CHE" isn't really adequate at all to describe the Polish "cie" sound.

disgusting old drunkard

Who? Harry?
Harry 79 | 13,413    
20 Jun 2017  #22

but "CHE" isn't really adequate at all to describe the Polish "cie" sound.

For once I agree with you. But you have misattributed your quote.

Just vile really. Nothing less.

Was a comment you were replying to completely deleted (I can't see anything in the bin)?
NoToForeigners 7 | 853    :-(
20 Jun 2017  #23

For once I agree with you.

Everyone who knows anything about Polish would agree with that simply because it's a FACT and your approvement is not needed at all.
Atch 12 | 1,746    
20 Jun 2017  #24

but "CHE" isn't really adequate at all to describe the Polish "cie" sound.

Excuse me, it's Polly the Pole who said 'che', I said it should be 'chee-e' which is correct. 'Che' is sloppy pronunciation. Every sound must be pronounced separately in Polish.
mafketis 16 | 4,721    
20 Jun 2017  #25

Can you year the diference between czeszę się and cieszę się? (roughly: I comb my hair, I'm glad) Cause I really can't... maybe in isolation spoken extra slowly yeah but in the middle of a sentence spoken at native speed.... nope. no way.

maybe CHYEH might be better than chee-e which suggests that the i is heard as a separate vowel (it's not)
Atch 12 | 1,746    
20 Jun 2017  #26

Can you year the diference

Well I can if the person speaks clearly but there are plenty of native Poles who are sloppy about it. I think maybe my ear is attuned that way from teaching reading in English to young children through the phonics method and spending years breaking words down into sound.

CHYEH

Yes absolutely, much better.
Harry 79 | 13,413    
20 Jun 2017  #27

Well, for one thing he can't pronounce "cie" in Polish. For another there are those other tests one needs to pass in order to get citizenship, and failing those badly enough can lead to being deported.
gumishu 11 | 4,547    
20 Jun 2017  #28

I said it should be 'chee-e' which is correct.

chee - e isn't correct either

Can you year the diference between czeszę się and cieszę się? (roughly: I comb my hair, I'm glad) Cause I really can't.

most Poles have no problem distinguishing the two
OP Polonius3 1,019 | 12,554    
20 Jun 2017  #29

said 'che'

This of course is a popular, not academic, phoneic rendering. Of course cie and cze are different sounds, but without special phonetic symbols it isn't easy to render them on the typical keyboard. Anyone interested in fathoming the basics of Polish phonology may visit:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_phonology#The_consonant_systemhtoming Polish
This is how those two sounds are presented phonetically:
/t͡ʂ/ cz czas ('time')
/t͡ɕ/ ć/c(i) ćma ('moth')
The difficulty in illustrating this the popular way is that English is pronoucned differently by different speakers. Cz is close to the ch in chat, whislt there is no easy way of popularly rendering ć. However, manyAmerican speakers pronounce the ch in cheese close to ć, so the English could be be rendered in Polish as ciz. The same speakers have no close equivalent of Polish cz. Many Americans esp. in the interior would pronounce This cheese is cheap quite close to Đys ciz yz cip.
Atch 12 | 1,746    
20 Jun 2017  #30

chee - e isn't correct either

Polly is right that it's hard to render in English! Believe me I do know how to say the 'cie' sound :) Maf's 'chyeh' is a much better rendering.




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