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Poles against religious exams in schools


delphiandomine 85 | 17,653    
11 Jun 2013  #1
Sixty five percent of Poles are against the introduction of religion exams for pupils completing their end of school matriculation, a new poll has found.

The survey follows discussions on the matter last week between representatives of Poland's Roman Catholic Episcopate and the Ministry of Education, with the latter concluding against the policy.

According to the poll, which was carried out by the Homo Homini Institute for the Rzeczpospolita daily, 28 percent of respondents were for the introduction of religion as an additional exam subject in Poland's school leaving exams, known as matura and typically taken by pupils aged 19.

Currently, pupils have three compulsory subjects - Polish, Mathematics and a modern language - in their matura exams, plus six additional subjects.

Senevty two percent of Prime Minister Tusk's centre-right Civic Platform party told the pollster that they were against the exams.

Supporters of the liberal, anti-clerical Palikot's Movement party - currently the third largest grouping in parliament - were 100 percent against, while those supporting the Democratic Left Alliance (SLD) were 80 percent against.

The proposal proved most popular with supporters of conservative opposition party Law and Justice (PiS) with 52 percent in favour of exams in religion. (nh/pg)

When even 48% of PiS supporters are against allowing religion to be taken as a Matura subject, it can be said that the public is against such an initiative.

If anyone was in any doubt as to the declining influence of the Church, well, here you are.
jkb - | 198    
11 Jun 2013  #2
Well it would be concerning if it was. Religion as it's being taught in polish schools in its current form has nothing to do with knowledge. It's rather a catholic indoctrination of our youth. Maybe one day, when the subject is called "study of religions" instead, and receives an objective curriculum containing information about different religions, their history, facts, etc., then one could start thinking about actually making an attempt at testing that knowledge. Just like history and antic culture or study of dance.
Harry    
11 Jun 2013  #3
Maybe one day, when the subject is called "study of religions" instead, and receives an objective curriculum containing information about different religions, their history, facts, etc., then one could start thinking about actually making an attempt at testing that knowledge. Just like history and antic culture or study of dance.

Precisely. I have nothing against the study of theology, but I very much resent paying for children to be indoctrinated by the RCC when they could be learning something useful.
jkb - | 198    
11 Jun 2013  #4
but I very much resent paying for children to be indoctrinated by the RCC when they could be learning something useful.

Spot on.
Harry    
11 Jun 2013  #5
Of course, I'm also very strongly against the RCC is allowed to play such a prominent role in Polish schools. A friend of mine asked for her kid to go to the optional 'ethics' classes that schools are supposedly required to provide as an alternative to Catholic indoctrination classes (in reality they don't): her kid wasn't allowed to go to the school Christmas party because she doesn't go to the religion classes.

Is there any real justification for RCC priest not going through identical vetting proceedings to other people who want to work in Polish state schools?
jkb - | 198    
11 Jun 2013  #6
associate gay love with religion

Don't you? :}
OP delphiandomine 85 | 17,653    
11 Jun 2013  #7
To come back to the topic somewhat, does anybody know what, if anything Polish school-children are taught about homosexuality? I get a rather nasty feeling that all they might be taught about it is that 'it's a sin!'. Is the topic addressed in any classes other than religion class?

Completely ignored, as far as I'm aware. I'd be surprised if it was even mentioned in religion classes as part of the programme.

I'm glad to see that the Ministry of Education has stood their ground on this - the Church was whining and moaning about it, but they also refused to integrate religion as a core part of the programme (which would mean far more rigorous oversight as to the programme itself)


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