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European News and Poland Thread 2


Ironside 50 | 10,991
6 Dec 2020 #151
No, I'm joking crow-esques like.
Just I'm a tad surprised that you had no expectations
Novichok 1 | 2,545
6 Dec 2020 #152
Do you think I'm lying?

Another weasel deflection. Being afraid of the speech police is different from lying and those two are not mutually exclusive: you can be truthful and still scared of your speech police.

Now, it's time to rationalize why Europe has no 1st Amendment rights but bs laws loaded with every meaningless bs adjective known to humans.

For social good and harmony, of course. Sure.
Vlad1234 16 | 757
6 Dec 2020 #153
view Russia, seeing it as the corrupt state run by oligarchs

I think he was spoking about perception of Russians in more distant past, in any case.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
6 Dec 2020 #154
Just I'm a tad surprised that you had no expectations

My expectations were already excelled in 1989, as cheesy as that might sound....I took the chances suddenly offered to me and run with them. I will never take them for granted and will be forever thankful for them, that means also for "western Europe and the EU".

Is everything perfect as I wish? Of course not....but...I KNOW it could be all so much worse!

And frankly nobody has come up yet with a better alternative, so I take this...

Being afraid of the speech police

Being disgusted by racists and Nazis and saying so isn't being afraid of the speech police...

You seem to entertain the notion that the oppressed people of Europe would gladly hail the next Führer if they wouldn't live in fear of the mean PC brigade, heh:)
Novichok 1 | 2,545
6 Dec 2020 #155
You seem to entertain the notion that the oppressed people of Europe would gladly hail the next Führe

Are you playing another Lyzko? Can't you just say it straight? Besides, please don't ever seem me. I say outright what I think.

And this is what I think: You don't have the 1st Amendment rights and it shows. That is how a man becomes a weasel - when he is afraid.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
6 Dec 2020 #156
....you think I'm afraid???

PS: You remind me about another dearly missed PF member who also always constantly criticized my wording...Rich? Is that you? :)
Crow 146 | 9,254
6 Dec 2020 #157
@Bratwurst Boy

You are lucky wurste. To live in Berlin (Brljin = mud) at this times. Svetovid loves you very much and cooperate with Christ on your fate.
Novichok 1 | 2,545
6 Dec 2020 #158
....you think I'm afraid???

Yes, I do.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
6 Dec 2020 #159
You are lucky wurste. To live in Berlin

I know! :)
Vlad1234 16 | 757
6 Dec 2020 #160
(Brljin = mud)

Actually this is a controversial legend. Quite possibly that name of Berlin descended from the ancient Slavic word "ber" which means "a bear". Hence a Russian word "berloga" which means "a bear's lair". There are other versions of this name origins. From other Slavic words. It looks like the version about swamp is not the most likely.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
6 Dec 2020 #161
Which makes sense, after all a bear is the heraldic animal of Berlin...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms_of_Berlin

On the other hand that could be because spoken Berlin sounds like "Bärlin"....Bär being the german word for bear...so....
Novichok 1 | 2,545
6 Dec 2020 #162
That bear was no match for the Russian kind.
Vlad1234 16 | 757
6 Dec 2020 #163
Bär being the german word for bear

I think English bear, Slavic "ber" (which is very archaic now) and German bär all have common Indo-European roots. Indo-European "bher" means "brown".
Crow 146 | 9,254
7 Dec 2020 #165
berloga

Your interpretation is possible. But Serbian BRLOG is older. Serbian is oldest Slavic ie European language. Its that R. Its only R that is used as vocal in Europe. Very ancient thing. Primordial. All other languges softened it. Non would say SRB. All softened. SARB, SURB, SERB, SYARB, etc. See?

When ancestors of todays Russians moved from Balkan after Ice Age to what is now Poland and then more Eastern they still used to say VEVERICA. Only later it become BELKA or something. But again on ligic of Serbian language because on the north existed only white-Bela, BJELA, BIJELA version of VEVERICA.

Indo-European

No such thing. There were only Sarmatians. Problem is they still are. Its political problem, not scientific.

Take BOOK. Its from BUKVA. Now go ask one English do he know what is BUKVA. How he could know when Romans confused them and separated from their original language, from Serbian. Some local Serbian ie Sarmatian.

See? What Indo-European? Let them explain BUKVA if its Indo-European. No, its Serbian.

There is the reason why Tolkien, Goethe and Grimm brothers studied Serbian. All European children grow up on Serbian feiry tales and mythology.

Hey people, you know nothing.

...interesting connection...

Exactly. Connection you can explain only with Serbian ie Slavic languages.

This is also interesting. Take VEDA from Sanskrit. Its known fact its closest ro Slavic languagesž

Spot... Russian VEDAT = to know.

But VEDA and VEDAT only gets full explanation in Serbian - PRIPOVEDATI = to talk story. PRIPO-VEDATI. Pripovetka = Story.

And what is VEDA, VEDANTA? Collection of stories.

Yes, Buddha was White and Scythian ie Sarmatian.

And what is only ethnic name mentioned in Rg Veda texts. Only SRBINDA. Only version of Sarmatian name.
Vlad1234 16 | 757
7 Dec 2020 #166
When ancestors of todays Russians moved from Balkan after Ice Age

I guess it happened already after Serbs dug up Adriatic Sea and domesticated mammoth?

Wiki claims name Berlin descended from Slavic Polabian word "berl" which means "a swamp". However I cannot remind such a word in Eastern Slavic languages, even amongst the archaic once. Could Poles or Serbians do? Never heard of something like this...

There are also versions it originated from such Slavic words as:
"Berl" - a personal name.
"Brlen" - a dam on the river for fishing or rafting.
And some other. These words are very archaic now, so it is difficult to verify it exactly.

This is also interesting. Take VEDA from Sanskrit.

1 to 10 count in Sanskrit. I can understand it almost without translation. Well, at least there are similarities.
youtube.com/watch?v=tnbWaIMwau8
Crow 146 | 9,254
7 Dec 2020 #167
One of biggest phenomenons on ancient history is fact that name of Thracians very often follow name od Sarmatians. Names on SRB and RAS/RUS. Th-racians (Greak corrupted) and linguists globally accept that Sarmatian name represent Greco-Roman corruption on name of Serbs.

For example. In the middle age Serbia was known also as Raska.

Take also Ethruscans (Eth-ruscans) who called themselves Raseni. In the same region lived Sabini, by Roman sources kin to Raseni (Roman corrupted Srbini).
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
7 Dec 2020 #168
Wiki claims name Berlin descended from Slavic Polabian word "berl" which means "a swamp".

I researched that abit further and it seems to be the most acknowledged theory (as the coat of arms really seems to stem from the hearing sound of Berlin...probably to differentiate themselves from the surrounding Brandenburger eagle).

"Ber" (swamp) + "lin" (some settlement at/beside/near by).....it is guessed that was coming from some old polabic language.

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polaben

What I found also most interesting that many other settlements could have their name origins from some nearby swamp....

Londinium

...Among the first scientific explanations was one by Giovanni Alessio in 1951.[3][16] He proposed a Ligurian rather than a Celtic origin, with a root *lond-/lont- meaning 'mud' or 'marsh'...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_London#Celtic

or

Brussels

...the most common theory of the origin of the name Brussels is that it derives from the Old Dutch Bruocsella, Broekzele or Broeksel, meaning "marsh" (bruoc / broek) and "home" (sella / zele / sel) or "home in the marsh".[41]

It seems old Europe was a real swampy affair.....
Vlad1234 16 | 757
7 Dec 2020 #169
"Ber" (swamp) ... from some old polabic language.

Where linguists dug it up from? Typically Slavic languages have many similarities, especially when it comes to the ancient vocabulary. The older words the more similarities. I never heard of any Slavic word like "ber" or "berl", "birl" (like it says in wikipedia) which would mean anything like swamp or mud. Possibly Poles or Czechs on this forum (who are Western Slavs like Polabeans) ever did? But instead in many Slavic languages "ber" is a "bear". That's for granted.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
7 Dec 2020 #170
Where linguists dug it up from?

Their best guess is the slawic "br`lo" meaning swamp or a dry place inside a wetland plus the slawic settlement suffix -in....and also that the name appears on earliest documents only as "the Berlin"...

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin#Namensbildung_und_erste_Besiedlungen
Vlad1234 16 | 757
7 Dec 2020 #171
Their best guess is the slawic "br`lo" meaning swamp

Should be something extremely archaic and dialectic. In any case this is not the only version.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
7 Dec 2020 #172
...no, it isn't. To much history is lost to the ages.
Vlad1234 16 | 757
7 Dec 2020 #173
One more thread about Berlin's name:
forum.wordreference.com/threads/etymology-berlin-swamp.96024/
Crow 146 | 9,254
7 Dec 2020 #174
I am more and more convinced that best solution for Europe represent Eastern Germany to separate and join in Central European Union. Sometimes I even have feeling that Russia have deal with certain circles within Germany or just with Eastern German politicians to create Eurasian Union from Erfurt to the Vladivostok as alternative to stupendously dangerous EU.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
7 Dec 2020 #175
One more thread about Berlin's name:

In this discussion there I found an interesting post:

...According to the Polish Wikipedia, Berlin comes from Braline, which according to this article comes from Bral, a short form of a Slavic name Bratoslaw....

Bratoslaw means in fact brotherly fame, so the name Berlin can be related to brother in Indo-European Languages.


Hmmm....I dunno....
Vlad1234 16 | 757
7 Dec 2020 #176
Berlin comes from Braline

It feels not very likely as "berl" not too similar to "bral". So, I wouldn't regard this version as a primary one.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,520
7 Dec 2020 #177
Yeah....we Germans have to face it...our capital isn't named after a mighty powerful animal or something nice and honorable...but a swamp! Okay...it had been pragmatic people back then, heh:)
Vlad1234 16 | 757
7 Dec 2020 #178
we Germans have to face it.

I wonder how someone could trace it and claim it with 100% certainty now?! How?! But what citizens of Berlin could do is to rename it officially. If they don't want to change the spelling they could just proclaim it is named in the honor of Germanic bar/Slavic ber - a bear! And don't care what is was named after when it was a village/small town. I'm sure there were no more swamps than bears in those places when it was founded, anyways.
Crow 146 | 9,254
7 Dec 2020 #179
swamp

Not Swamp. Its Mud. Its different.

Enter in the head of ancients. Think like them. I assure you no chance they build settlement in the swamp. Swamp isn't healthy.

So, how it was. They cleared land for the settlement. They started to build and happened heavy rain, for days probably. Clear land akways turn into Mud when rain. So they just named it Mud. In Serbian BLATO. Its often very simple.

Or, more probable

Its possible they named it BRLOG as Vlad suggested. Brlog is hideout for Bear. In animistic society of ancients they maybe, that particular tribe venerated Bear and desired protection from Bear, animal protector.

See, its possible original was BRLOG. Its later softened in B-E-RLOG. Berlin with time.

Serbs named it. I would bet on BRLOG as original. Its like one name it STAN or HOUSE, just having Bear in mind. BRLOG is house of Bear people.

I would give you even more.

Take Serbian word BRVNO. Soften it, exclude R as vocal and you get B-E-RVNO. If you ask me I will translate to you. Its also very logical. Most logical even.

See how I play games here. Numerous combinations and all have sense. There was no Indo European. It was Sarmatia. Jakob Grimm knew that.
Vlad1234 16 | 757
7 Dec 2020 #180
So they just named it Mud

It looks strange for me to name any settlement after a mud. I cannot easily remember any large city with a similar name origins. Not too typical. For example Kiev was named (according to a legend) after Kij - a one of its legendary founder brothers. Moscow - after Moskva river (word of a Finno-Hungarian origins). Rome after Romul, etc... There are not even too many villages in Ukraine which would have a name similar to "Mud". No taste whatsoever.


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