The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / News  % width posts: 1,169

Does democratic Poland guarantee it's LGBT citizens respect for human and civil rights?


Polsyr 6 | 769
15 Jun 2015 #211
I am tempted to go do a live webcast from Plac Zbawiciela to show the world the big fat lie about the burned rainbow and permanent police presence.
Harry
15 Jun 2015 #212
it is gaurded by police round the clock. From: Niezależna.PL

And the references to the riot police and the attack dogs (which the Polish police don't even have) that now exist in the minds of Polish-Americans after a hack shamelessly lied to them about the rainbow? The same riot police and attack dogs which none of us who live in Poland have ever seen there, despite that hack claiming that they are there 24/7?
johnny reb 18 | 3,750
15 Jun 2015 #213
quote by jon

And where did you read it - on your palm, while picking the hairs out?

More insults.......oh jon now play nice.
Think what you want jon, I need not defend myself to you just because you and Harry have over 25% of the post in this thread to TRY and control your promoting of homosexuality on a thread that was started 4 years ago.

This thread is about to guarantee rights to the gays and has nothing to do with Poland ACCEPTING their discusting behavior.
Poland's government does what it has to to respect ALL citizens including homo's but it doesn't mean they are in favor of their ilk that they try to promote.

It certainly does not as it appears to what I read in the newspapers and what I see on the news.
Now of course that is in contradiction to what you are trying to promote here with over thirty posts in this thread how little old ladies are waving flags from balconies, people cheering from their doorways, dogs barking, children laughing, balloons, champaign flowing, commotion in acceptance to you hacks to paint a much different picture to brainwash the kids here that Poland guarantee's not the rights of gays but accepts the gays. Big difference jon.

Now how about YOU staying on topic.
jon357 63 | 14,254
15 Jun 2015 #214
little old ladies are waving flags from balconies, people cheering from their doorways, dogs barking, children laughing, balloons

Apart from the dogs and balloons, all true. In Poland rights re accepted and in Warsaw people tend not to moralise about others - they just get on with life. And the annual parade was a great success this year.
johnny reb 18 | 3,750
15 Jun 2015 #215
In Poland rights re accepted

Poland guarantee's rights for respect.
Isn't that just worth two circles and a snap.
It has nothing to do with acceptance.
Stay on topic jon, just like you have been hammering home to everyone in this thread.
jon357 63 | 14,254
15 Jun 2015 #216
It has nothing to do with acceptance.

The two are inseparable. Without one, you don't generally get the other. And in Poland's Centuries' old liberal culture, freedom is respected. Remember, this is Europe.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
15 Jun 2015 #217
Centuries' old liberal culture, freedom is respected

Poland has had centuries of old traditional Catholic culture where freedom was respected and heretics were not burnt at the stake like they were in the "enlightened" West.
jon357 63 | 14,254
15 Jun 2015 #218
The tolerance for differing viewpoints is very much part of Poland's liberal tradition; in fact it was a certain religious body which despised any diversity or any spiritual path they couldn't control, though as Polish society urbanises religion is now very much on the wane and diversity, freedom, tolerance and hedonism on the up. No bad thing.

The wonderful success of Saturday's Parada Równości shows that beautifully.
Harry
15 Jun 2015 #219
Poland has had centuries of old traditional Catholic culture where freedom was respected and heretics were not burnt at the stake like they were in the "enlightened" West.

Care to remind us where the last legal execution of a witch in Europe was?

But fortunately those days are now long gone and only an ever more tiny proportion of Poles don't respect the right people have to their own religion (even Wicca) and their own sexuality.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
15 Jun 2015 #220
execution of a witch

Harryesque proportions -- one witch and hundreds of heretics burnt at Western stakes.
Harry
15 Jun 2015 #221
And the Poles burned at the stake for converting to Judaism, such as Katarzyna Weiglowa and Abraham ben Abraham?

But thankfully that's now long behind Poland; Poland gets more tolerant every single year. And by some strange coincidence every year fewer and fewer Poles bother going to church. I wonder if that's just a coincidence.
jon357 63 | 14,254
15 Jun 2015 #222
to their own religion (even Wicca)

There is actually a very strong and valid parallel with the thread topic here. There's certainly no shortage of occultists in Poland and many hundreds of years' tradition of that. A nice link to some Polish witches here, though further discussion of this belongs in another thread: the-other.info/2014/witches-healers-spell-casters-poland

since there's very little LGBT crossover with the occult. Except to show that Poland has a long tradition of diversity and the whole Ciemnogrod thing with the more conservative factions RCC exciting its cold, dead hand was just a temporary blip. Poland's respect for human and civil rights as well as increasingly visible diversity is proof of this.

Poland is a country with a longer tradition of respecting freedom and differences (a very long history of an LGBT public presence) than the recent and relatively brief mono-cultural, theocratic period that achieved so little and is now waning, as we pass into the Age of Aquarius. Worth reading Hoene-Wronski - Polish, much underrated and due for a revival.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
15 Jun 2015 #223
brief mono-cultural, theocratic period

Like one thousand years!
jon357 63 | 14,254
15 Jun 2015 #224
Much shorter, unless Nineteenth Century Pietists had a time machine. Before that brief blip, Poland was also an oasis of freedom and tolerance as it is now.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
15 Jun 2015 #225
oasis of freedom

But never for sexual deviates!
Lyzko 24 | 6,759
15 Jun 2015 #226
So what happened??
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
15 Jun 2015 #227
hedonism on the up

Wallowing in hedonistic excess is good in a world half of whose people go hungry?
Is that one of the many LGBTQ neo-virtues?
jon357 63 | 14,254
15 Jun 2015 #228
sexual deviates!

Wrong on that one, and as usual a pleasure to call you out on it. If by your favourite subject of "sexual deviates' you mean people who are not heterosexual, you might have forgotten that the legal framework in Poland has for the most part been much more liberal than most other places and some of Poland's best known figures over the centuries have been LGBT.
Lyzko 24 | 6,759
15 Jun 2015 #229
I repeat, when abouts was Poland transformed from a "hotbed" of tolerance into a kind of oasis of the primitive and xenophobic? Surely, no single factor's to blame here:-)
jon357 63 | 14,254
15 Jun 2015 #230
The Nineteenth Century had a lot to be blamed for, and again (and especially), the puritanism of the PRL and the equally puritanical reaction to it. Plus of course the religion bubble during the unstable years that followed.
Harry
15 Jun 2015 #231
The Nineteenth Century had a lot to be blamed for, and again, the PRL and the unstable years that followed.

Don't forget the Nazi attempt to exterminate Poland's intelligentsia, that killed off a lot of people who would have led the nation towards tolerance and away from hatred.
jon357 63 | 14,254
16 Jun 2015 #232
I think it's valid to mention that since it's very relevant - the pre-war period was (as in Germany until a certain point) a great flowering of tolerance and fashion - the war and its aftermath set back progress for human rights, opens and individualism a long way. Plus the role of the church (who meant well - they were just trying to hold together a complex and changing society) after the PRL fell.

Nevertheless the picture was neither all that bleak nor especially different from a lot of places in Western Europe (and far freer than some parts of the US). Poland did retain some plurality and there was a discreet LGBT commercial scene as well as established places to meet. There was even a Warsaw version of Polari, now almost dead.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
16 Jun 2015 #233
some of Poland's best known figures

Some of the best-known figures in Poland and elsewhere were deviates (Wilde), drug addicts (Doyle) and alcoholics (Hemingway). Does that ennoble those failings? No, it only shows that despite such afflicitions in one area they made a creative contribution in another.
jon357 63 | 14,254
16 Jun 2015 #234
Plus military, scientists, humanitarians, artists, writers, politicians, monarchs...
Lyzko 24 | 6,759
16 Jun 2015 #235
Thanks! Most of your responses make sense, especially the one about the purging of the intelligentsia under Gomułka:-) Yep, that'll do it every time!
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
16 Jun 2015 #236
military, scientists, humanitarians, artists, writers, politicians, monarchs...

Best-known figures cover all those and more. So what's the bottom line -- are we to promote
substance abuse and deviant behaviour? What will it prove? Where will it lead? To the "brave new world"?!
jon357 63 | 14,254
16 Jun 2015 #237
to promotesubstance abuse

Society does exactly that - you've said yourself here that drinking vodka in the morning can be acceptable and many times during the evening there are beer adverts on Polish TV. Heck, visitors to the Presidential Palace even get a a glass of champagne.

deviant behaviour

A largely redundant phrase.

Where will it lead? To the "brave new world"?!

Probably. The world is becoming a better place and as Poland matures and casts off the horrors of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries we are already seeing a return to its enlightened, tolerant and pluralistic roots. Very few people (and getting fewer) want a return to the values of the1950s. The 20,000 happy and positive participants in Saturday's Parada Równości as opposed to the 20 or 30 weird protestors is as good a sign as any.
johnny reb 18 | 3,750
16 Jun 2015 #238
The road to hell itself was built on good intentions.
The Poles may respect all humans but you will never see them in your life time accept homosexuality.
Those dogs are trained to attack homosexuals if they get out of control.
Levi 12 | 450
16 Jun 2015 #239
It is really funny when gays try to convince us that homossexuality, gay gang bangs or free sex orgies with multiple partners while crazy on drugs are SO MODERN and those that doesn't accept it to be done in the middle of the streets are old people.

Maybe they should read a bit about classic history. All that was already done by Roman Empire governed by Caligula 2 thousand years ago.
DominicB - | 2,678
16 Jun 2015 #240
gay gang bangs or free sex orgies with multiple partners while crazy on drugs

Sounds like so much fun. Makes me wish I were gay. Where do I sign up?

Home / News / Does democratic Poland guarantee it's LGBT citizens respect for human and civil rights?
Discussion is closed.