The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered [2]  |  Archives [1] 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / News  % width posts: 63

Lithuanian ambassador 'Poles not loyal citizens'


PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
20 Jun 2011  #1
The Lithuanian ambassador in Warsaw has criticised Poles resident in the Baltic state for not being loyal to authorities in Vilnius.
"[In Lithuania] there are Russians, Belarusians, Jews, and they are all 'more Lithuanian' than the [ethnic] Poles [residing there]," Ambassador Zakareviciene told the agency.

Poles-not-loyal-citizens-says-Lithuanian-ambassador

kresy24.pl/showNews/news_id/16728/
Sokrates 8 | 3,348    
20 Jun 2011  #2
Lithuanian anti-Polonism ftw, i'm just waiting till they start murdering our people, wonder if Warsaw reacts to that.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
20 Jun 2011  #3
“[In Lithuania] there are Russians, Belarusians, Jews, and they are all ‘more Lithuanian’ than the [ethnic] Poles [residing there],” Ambassador Zakareviciene told the agency.

What did I say on the other thread about Poles in Lithuania? They're mad that Poles have been living there in large numbers for 2 centuries and have assimilated less than Russians who came after WWII. Maybe they don't wanna be Lithuanians.
Nathan 18 | 1,363    
20 Jun 2011  #4
for not being loyal to authorities in Vilnius

Maybe they don't wanna be Lithuanians.

Would you, please, expand on this one, PennBoy?
Sokrates 8 | 3,348    
20 Jun 2011  #5
Maybe they don't wanna be Lithuanians.

What does Lithuania have to offer? Rich culture and tradition perhaps?

What did I say on the other thread about Poles in Lithuania? They're mad that Poles have been living there in large numbers for 2 centuries

For 5 centuries.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
20 Jun 2011  #6
Would you, please, expand on this one, PennBoy?

Maybe they wanna live in Lithuania but like they have been doing for centuries, as Poles not assimilating, mixing with the general population. For fear of losing their identity and forgetting that they're Poles. That's what the Lithuanians are afraid of too.
sobieski 107 | 2,129    
20 Jun 2011  #7
PennBoy:
Maybe they don't wanna be Lithuanians.

What does Lithuania have to offer? Rich culture and tradition perhaps?
PennBoy:
What did I say on the other thread about Poles in Lithuania? They're mad that Poles have been living there in large numbers for 2 centuries

For 5 centuries.

Related to Dmowski, are you? Family having had a career in the blue police or the nsz? Picketing on KM under some ridiculous tent?
Nathan 18 | 1,363    
20 Jun 2011  #8
Maybe they wanna live in Lithuania but like they have been doing for centuries, as Poles not assimilating, mixing with the general population. For fear of losing their identity and forgetting that they're Poles. That's what the Lithuanians are afraid of too.

But they are not Poles. If you are living in a country for 2 or 5 centuries - this is your country!!! Let's say I am a Ukrainian through my parents born in Chili. Then Chili is my country. I respect the traditions of my parents, but at the same time I am a Chilian, above all. If there are some that are incapable of learning language or respecting traditions and culture of the country of birth - then it is their problem and a shrink might be of help.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
20 Jun 2011  #9
But they are not Poles. If you are living in a country for 2 or 5 centuries - this is your country!!! Let's say I am a Ukrainian through my parents born in Chili. Then Chili is my country. I respect the traditions of my parents, but at the same time I am a Chilian, above all.

OK I understand that completely but what if your parents taught and raised you as a Ukrainian??? I know people who's children were born here and got them Polish citizenships. I know some girls who were born here (America) and refuse to marry anyone other than a Polish guy because they want their kids to be Polish and speak it just like their parents taught it to them.
Sokrates 8 | 3,348    
20 Jun 2011  #10
But they are not Poles. If you are living in a country for 2 or 5 centuries

They speak polish, they have polish culture and are ethnically polish so yes they're Poles.

Let's say I am a Ukrainian through my parents born in Chili.

No such thing as Ukrainian, there's Poles, Russians and monkeys inhabiting Ukraine, you're either a Pole a Russian or a monkey :))
delphiandomine 85 | 17,648    
20 Jun 2011  #11
Maybe they wanna live in Lithuania but like they have been doing for centuries, as Poles not assimilating, mixing with the general population. For fear of losing their identity and forgetting that they're Poles. That's what the Lithuanians are afraid of too.

Wow.

Probably one of the most sensible things ever said about the whole situation.

Lithuanians want them to integrate, they don't want to (or more accurately, their political leaders don't want to - from what I've heard, ordinary Polish/Lithuanian relations are fine and don't reflect the political insults) - and both sides are absolutely terrified of losing their independence, language and culture.
Torq 26 | 2,362    
20 Jun 2011  #12
Zoological anti-polonism in Žemaitija (let's use the proper name of the nazi statelet)
is rearing its ugly head once again.

language and culture.

Yeah, about that:

I think it's time for Poland to officially protest against the use of the name Lithuania by Zemaitija
(Żmudź), just like Greeks protest against the name Macedonia (only they're wrong, but that's
a different story.)

The fact is that this nation, speaking this strange, incomprehensible language and describing
themselves as "Lithuanians", are in fact Žemaitijans (Żmudzini), and the real Lithuanians live
in a country that today is called "Belarus" (funny Stalin's invention to justify taking those
lands away from Poland). Where is the river Niemen? Where is Nowogródek (where Mickiewicz
was born)? Did Mickiewicz write "Białorusi, ojczyzno moja?" - no, it was Lithuania back then,
the real Lithuania, not Zemajtija. Zemajtijans have stolen Lithuanian identity and they hate
Poles because they know that we remember this theft. Zemajtija's territory equals more or
less the former territory of Litwa Kowieńska (Kaunas Lithuania), and Wilno does not belong
to Zemajtija.

So, the fascists want to play hard? Very well, let's play hard - Poland should protest the use
of the name Lithuania in international relations. The only acceptable names for the nazi statelet
are either Zemajtija or FSROL (Former Soviet Republic of Lithuania).

*see Lithuanians, that's what's going to happen if you don't change your attitude towards Polish
minority - even the moderate, pro-Lithuanian people in Poland, LIKE ME, will turn against you...
oh,well - your choice*

ShortHairThug - | 1,103    
20 Jun 2011  #13
No joke serious. American born Polish girls who will only marry a Pole

Face it, she didn’t want to have anything to do with you or your friend, whatever – you were simply not her type. However you rationalize it, it still won’t change the way you appear to her. I know, it’s hard to face reality when dealing with rejection.

Why the hell they live here if they feel that way?

GW, do you find every guy attractive? Please.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
20 Jun 2011  #14
Face it, she didn’t want to have anything to do with you or your friend, whatever – you were simply not her type.

What are you talking about? I'm Polish. BTW I dated one of them. You misunderstood what i wrote I said they don't want to marry American men just someone who lives there but came from Poland, who's Polish and speaks the language because they'd like their kids to also.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,389    
20 Jun 2011  #15
the topic is wandering
ShortHairThug - | 1,103    
20 Jun 2011  #16
What are you talking about?

I heard what you said but what’s the reason behind it especially for someone who was born there and has trouble speaking the language in the first place? Sounds like you simply can’t stand rejection even if you do speak broken Polish.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
20 Jun 2011  #17
I was born in Stalowa Wola came here when I was 9, my Polish is just as good as my English. Let me rephrase what I said ,me talk to my Polish American (girl) friends (we only had a conversation about it) and they said they'll only marry someone who came from Poland. I wasn't talking about myself, although I did date one of them before.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103    
20 Jun 2011  #18
I was born in Stalowa Wola came here when I was 9,

And still given a boot which proves my point, besides what the affairs of heart have to do with loyalty to any country?
sobieski 107 | 2,129    
20 Jun 2011  #19
let's use the proper name of the nazi statelet

As to pretending the NSZ was a proper resistance movement? Not mentioning the Świętokrzyżka brigade?
And why pretending the "Kresy" were "Polish", when they were in fact the nearest thing Poland had which could be called colonies?
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
20 Jun 2011  #20
And still given a boot

I wasn't given any boot you dont know me boy
Nathan 18 | 1,363    
20 Jun 2011  #21
OK I understand that completely but what if your parents taught and raised you as a Ukrainian???

For 5 centuries? What kind of parents raise a distrophic child like that? If that child is to live in a country he was born in, then why in the hell not teach him the culture of the birthplace, besides their own fairytales?

I know some girls who were born here (America) and refuse to marry anyone other than a Polish guy because they want their kids to be Polish and speak it just like their parents taught it to them.

Let them have a kid and the kid might be barely speaking Polish; nothing to say of his kids. Because they have THEIR country and not their parents'.

It is a problem brought upon the Poles themselves: the kids were born in Lithuania. This is their country. You want them to remember their heritage - fine, but don't cross the boundaries: don't make those kids feel themselves foreigners in the country of their birth.
Crow 143 | 7,407    
20 Jun 2011  #22
What`s wrong with Lithuania? What happened to them in the meanwhile? During Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, they were quite normal, in panic because of Germanic and Russian di**s but, normal. Poles and Serbs then intervened and saved them and Lithuania was thankful. Did Lithuanians forgot who saved them?
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
21 Jun 2011  #23
What kind of parents raise a distrophic child like that?

Let them have a kid and the kid might be barely speaking Polish; nothing to say of his kids. Because they have THEIR country and not their parents'.
It is a problem brought upon the Poles themselves: the kids were born in Lithuania. This is their country. You want them to remember their heritage - fine, but don't cross the boundaries: don't make those kids feel themselves foreigners in the country of their birth.

Look at it this way. They're in a country (Lithuania) right next door to where their ancestral homeland is. They live in a region that used to be part of Poland in which the MAJORITY of the people are of Polish decent, who speak Polish at home, who identify with Polish culture. They look, act, live as Poles only difference is they don't live there. Sorry but it's their choice, they're in a EU country.


AussieSheila 5 | 75    
21 Jun 2011  #24
That is extremely heavy handed approach by Lithuanian authorities. I think the Polish shopkeeper should take her case to European court of human rights, isnt that what all minorities in the UK did when they didnt get their way? Then again they were Nazi colloborators weren't they? So I am not surprised they are picking on minorities to make them feel unwelcome.
Crow 143 | 7,407    
21 Jun 2011  #25
am i sensing German influence on Lithuanians? Germany is NATO`s and EU`s watchful eye over Poland
MediaWatch 10 | 945    
21 Jun 2011  #26
I think the Lithuanians just want the Poles in their country to speak Lithuanian. They are correct about that. That's why some Lithuanians are getting upset. But they should stay away from making provocative comments. So should the Poles.

But what you say is interesting.

But they are not Poles.

I agree. People who choose to live in a country should learn to speak that country's language and assimilate. I don't know why some Poles in Lithuania don't want to learn Lithuanian when Poles in general were good at assimilating and learning the language of most countries they went to.

Most people of Polish ancestry in America speak English well.

No such thing as Ukrainian, there's Poles, Russians and monkeys inhabiting Ukraine, you're either a Pole a Russian or a monkey :))

Sok, there is no need to make these anti-Ukrainian remarks.

The Ukrainians I know are fine people.
Nathan 18 | 1,363    
21 Jun 2011  #27
I don't know why some Poles in Lithuania don't want to learn Lithuanian when Poles in general were good at assimilating and learning the language of most countries they went to.

Exactly. It is usually old farts who raise the smoke over young heads. It'll pass.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,544    
21 Jun 2011  #28
am i sensing German influence on Lithuanians? Germany is NATO`s and EU`s watchful eye over Poland

since the mid-18th hundreds Lithuanians have been vastly influenced by Germans/Germany and abandoned the Polish cause. (the elite)

country doesn't mean nationstate Nathan. One can be ethnically something else and not even speak the language of the state to be pro- that state. Austria comes to mind.

Nathan are you advocating that for instance your kids if they moved to... Norway for instance, learned Norwegian and forgot about their Ukrainian roots? How would you feel about not being able to talk to them unless you know Norwegian or you both English? How do you think your family would think of it? In what language would they pray? What you want is nothing else then assimilation!

Your using the same tongue Polish landlords/politicians in the past or Prussians used! Shame on you! Nathan! shame on you...
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
21 Jun 2011  #29
I don't know why some Poles in Lithuania don't want to learn Lithuanian when Poles in general were good at assimilating and learning the language of most countries they went to.

Because the Lithuanians are going about the whole thing in a forceful Stalinist way, persecuting Poles. No one wants to be forced to do something. Plus there were confessions of Lithuanians specifically targeting Poles just because they're the largest minority or just because they are Poles and Poland occupied their lands.

Poland 'regrets' Lithuanian ambassador's 'Polish disloyalty' statement

thenews.pl/1/10/Artykul/46616,Poland-%E2%80%98regrets-Lithuanian-ambassadors-Polish-disloyalty-statement
Crow 143 | 7,407    
21 Jun 2011  #30
Serbian intelligentsia has significant influence on Lithuanian patriotic circles. Serbians already moving things in direction of another Commonwealth. Poland should be ready when the moment come


Home / News / Lithuanian ambassador 'Poles not loyal citizens'
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.