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ACCEPTABLE modest wear for Polish women?


abu3issa 14 | 42
13 Mar 2013  #1
I'm trying to find out what is acceptable modest wear. I mean, the kind that doesn't bring TOO much attention that this girl is a "prude" but doesn't reveal too much body details like skinny jeans does.

Any advice? I would like to hear from both sides, men and women.

What kind of clothes do you find modest and good for everyday life (university/work/hanging out with friends)
beckski 12 | 1,617
13 Mar 2013  #2
I visited Poland during the summertime. Many of the females dressed in light, casual clothing. Their daytime attire included tank
tops, loose-fitting shorter skirts and capri pants.
OP abu3issa 14 | 42
13 Mar 2013  #3
I wish I could make changes to my original post. I guess I should rephrase it.

What can a Muslim girl wear in Poland, to appear modest yet blend in with society? (regardless of hijab)
Polsyr 6 | 769
13 Mar 2013  #4
Abu 3issa,

When in Rome do like the Romans.

Purpose of Islamic dress code is specifically to blend in and not attract attention - as far as I know.

My advice: go there; see how people dress and dress like them! This usually work for any place!

Generally speaking:

Jeans + T-shirt = blends in

Skirt or shorts + tank top = blends in

Short, long, a bit revealing, not so revealing = all blends in

However:

Chicken suit = does not blend in

Fluorescent green or yellow = does not blend in

Black Hijab, niqab, abaya, burgu3 = does not blend in and may very well attract more attention, mostly negative

Stylish head scarf (like pashmina for example) = may blend in if it is winter or on an older person
OP abu3issa 14 | 42
13 Mar 2013  #5
Polsyr, I'm very grateful for your response :)

How about a hat and roll her hair inside instead of a hijab? Although the neck would show but I'm not really sure which is more priority.

You are half right about the islamic code dress purpose. The main idea is to BLEND in, but within standards of modesty (actually this applies for both men and women unlike a lot of people think).

So tank tops and short skirts are out of the question, at least for me and my family.

What would you recommend that would be the least revealing and the most blending?
Polsyr 6 | 769
13 Mar 2013  #6
What would you recommend that would be the least revealing and the most blending?

abu3issa

For hair, try something called bonnet hair cover. It is a popular accessory in many parts of the world and blends in without attracting the wrong kind of attention. Do an image search on google and you will see what I am talking about. You can even order them online.
Paulina 9 | 1,448
13 Mar 2013  #7
How about a hat and roll her hair inside instead of a hijab?

That would be OK.

Or maybe something like this:

wear in poland

What would you recommend that would be the least revealing and the most blending?

How about this?:

modest wear in poland

2

14
OP abu3issa 14 | 42
13 Mar 2013  #8
Although I rather the long skirts she would truly prefer the pink and blue jeans

Much appreciated Paulina
If you have more ideas please give me :)
kaz200972 2 | 229
13 Mar 2013  #9
Hi,
I visit Poland regularly, I'm Sikh (sort of) so I do appreciate your dilemma. In summer straight leg jeans with a long sleeved,mid thigh shirt or smock should be okay. There are some quite nice thigh length tops in the shops. A nice chuni (long scarf) wrapped around your head and tied at the back of your neck won't attract too much attention.

In winterb the long chunky sweaters and cardigans over jeans, woollen scarves and hats to cover your hair. If you have any job interviews etc... Black wide legged trousers with a knee or mid thigh jacket over. I don't know if you wear make up? it's better to wear very little, looks much nicer. I hope this helps.
Paulina 9 | 1,448
14 Mar 2013  #10
If you have more ideas please give me :)

OK, I'll try :)

Although I rather the long skirts she would truly prefer the pink and blue jeans

If she likes colourful clothes then she could go with skirts like these, for example:

And as kaz200972 wrote she could combine those wide jeans with a tunic blouse:

Also, during summer when it's hot she could wear those tunics with wide linen pants, which are a classic and elegant choice for that time of year:

As for skirts, then this could be considered a very casual "university" look:

Everyday outfit:

For work:

Poland work clothes-

Something more chic, elegant:
Elegant outfit in Poland

And more summer looks:
broken link

To be honest I'm not sure what would be acceptable for Muslims, so I don't know what to propose. Are long sleeves in blouses obligatory? And how close to the body they could be? For me, for example, the first "summer look" (the photo with the white chair in the background) is pure innocence, but maybe it wouldn't be acceptable for a Muslim girl?

Btw, how old is she?

In winter the long chunky sweaters and cardigans over jeans, woollen scarves and hats to cover your hair.

+1
Or woollen skirts:

woolen skirt from poland-

lol Paulina, it wasnt a stag party,,, just a normal tuesday night :D

I had a feeling you'll write that lol

But Muslim women dont have to conform to Saudi norms... they can conform to there new adopted countries laws...

Well, if she's a Muslim then she may want to conform to some Muslim laws out of her free will and then it's neither mine nor your business.

For example, they wouldnt like it if you went there and walked around in a bikini.... when in Rome... it works both ways u know...

Tom, even in Europe you can wear a bikini only on a beach lol
TommyG 1 | 361
14 Mar 2013  #11
Tom, even in Europe you can wear a bikini only on a beach lol

Rubbish!!! Have you not been to a british niteclub.... i mean dyskotek...
girls walk around in underwear all the time... :)
not all muslim girls are traditionalists... same as some catholic girls in poland dont believe in no sex before marriage.... when i say some...i mean most..
Paulina 9 | 1,448
14 Mar 2013  #12
Rubbish!!! Have you not been to a british niteclub.... i mean dyskotek...

No, I haven't been to a British nightclub. Abu3issa's is asking about Poland. He asked: "What can a Muslim girl wear in Poland, to appear modest yet blend in with society?"

Walking around in underwear isn't "modest", do you understand that, Tom?

not all muslim girls are traditionalists...

So?

same as some catholic girls in poland dont believe in no sex before marriage.... when i say some...i mean most..

That's fascinating, Tom, but what does it have to do with clothes for a Muslim girl?
OP abu3issa 14 | 42
14 Mar 2013  #13
Thank you very much Paulina & Kaz :D
It's a real honor to see people from different backgrounds helping each other with open minds and open hearts.
Honestly, if the would discuss religious things this way, we'd have achieved world peace and harmony centuries ago.

Thank you Paulina for your responses. It seems Tom made two replies but I only see one ='/

Regardless, it doesn't matter what religious background you come from, you are right about "when in Rome". But you forgot something, Saudi Arabia are 99.9% Muslims, you have to follow the norms of that society, otherwise you'd be disrespectful to them. Imagine walking in a church in a bikini? I think the people inside would consider it insulting. Now imagine that nation wide. In the other hand, in Poland and most western communities, there are people from all kind of religious backgrounds. So it's more acceptable to walk around in whatever clothes you like as long as you keep up with most social norms. Take nuns for example, they still cover almost like a Muslim girl does. It's their choice and people respect them for that. At least this is my opinion in this matter.

That's the whole point of my thread here. I want to visit Poland, a country with very very few Muslims, and be able to walk around with my family without the letting go of my religious standards while being able to blend (even slightly) with Polish society norms. Finding that balance is something I want to do out of respect to Poland and its people.
TommyG 1 | 361
14 Mar 2013  #14
But you forgot something, Saudi Arabia are 99.9% Muslims, you have to follow the norms of that society, otherwise you'd be disrespectful to them.

abu, I agre with you... if a western girl went to Saudi she would dress accordingly....
if a muslim goes to poland, she too may have the same courtesy....
at the end of the day, anyone can wear whatever they like in Poland.. its a free country....
if you want to stand out thats fine, if you want to conform to the socail norms thats fine too...it's not a big deal....
yehudi 1 | 432
14 Mar 2013  #15
to walk around with my family without the letting go of my religious standards while being able to blend

How about food. You can't eat the meat in Polish restaurants. When I was in Poland I brought my own food from home because I can't eat anything cooked in a non-kosher kitchen. At least I can drink the beer, but I don't think you're allowed to do that.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
14 Mar 2013  #16

Are you wearing a hijab ? I'm just asking...
OP abu3issa 14 | 42
14 Mar 2013  #17
@Yehudi:
HEY!!! How are you my friend? :D
I have considered that, I would turn myself into a vegetarian unless invited by friends who understand my religious diet.
I thought I might find kosher restraunts, since we are allowed to eat the food prepared by Jews and Christians (unless pork or prepared using alcohol) but I'm not sure I'd find many, and now with your comment I'm definitely turning vegetarian during my stay xD

Although I was told KFC is ok but I'm not sure. They could be using animal fat (pigs mainly) to extract cooking oil ='/

@Grzegorz_:
No, I'm a man. We don't wear hijab but we still have modesty standards in our clothing.
yehudi 1 | 432
14 Mar 2013  #18
Hey abu3issa. Doing fine, thank G-d.

When I travel abroad, it's sometimes a problem to keep my head covered, which we're supposed to do even indoors. I either wear a kippah or a hat and that doesn't always blend in well in Europe. The good side is that when I do wear a kippah, any Jew who sees me recognizes me as a "member of the tribe" and then we start to talk as if we were old friends.

You won't find a kosher restaurant in Poland except maybe in Krakow, but if you see a guy in the street with a kippah, just walk up to him and say "Where can a Jew eat around here?"
Paulina 9 | 1,448
14 Mar 2013  #19
Thank you very much Paulina & Kaz :D

You're welcome :)

It's a real honor to see people from different backgrounds helping each other with open minds and open hearts.

:)

Thank you Paulina for your responses. It seems Tom made two replies but I only see one ='/

No problem, I'm religious myself. Tom's posts ended up in the bin (Random Chat Thread (deleted periodically)).

Finding that balance is something I want to do out of respect to Poland and its people.

That's very nice of you and I'm sure the girl will enjoy it, however:

at the end of the day, anyone can wear whatever they like in Poland.. its a free country....

Tom is right, Abu3issa, the girl can wear a hijab if she wants to, it wouldn't be considered disrespectful by Polish people. The only downside would be that people would stare at her, as there are so few Muslims in Poland and her outfit would be considered something "exotic" ;)

Btw, is "the Muslim girl" your wife or daughter? Is she Saudi Arabian?

(Mods, shouldn't this thread be in the "Society, Culture" section of the forum?)
Harry
14 Mar 2013  #20
You won't find a kosher restaurant in Poland except maybe in Krakow

And Warsaw and Lublin and Gdansk and Tykocin and Lodz and Zamosc and Kazimierz Dolny, and those are just the ones which come straight off the top of my head!
yehudi 1 | 432
14 Mar 2013  #21
There might be restaurants that call themselves kosher, but they're often just "Jewish style" and don't really keep the rules of kashrut (kosherness?). And my experience has been that kosher restaurants in remote places are never open when I'm there. Maybe it's just my luck.
jon357 63 | 14,122
14 Mar 2013  #22
There are also Halal places in the far east of Poland. As far as I know, unless someone is very strict indeed the two are compatible.
Harry
14 Mar 2013  #23
There might be restaurants that call themselves kosher, but they're often just "Jewish style" and don't really keep the rules of kashrut (kosherness?).

The ones I'm thinking of are properly kosher.
OP abu3issa 14 | 42
14 Mar 2013  #24
I am learning so much from all of you :) I really appreciate the time and effort you are all putting into this.
My trip to Poland is exciting me to no end. I know there would be a few disappointments. But It's still exciting nonetheless.
In Saudi and back in Yemen I've met Christians,Hindu,Athiests and even Sikh.
But they were living OUR way, there wasn't much of cultural exchange except through conversation, filled with "back home we did this and that". I honestly want to visit some churches. A friend of mine visited a church in Egypt and told me how interesting.

@Yehudi:
Yeah I'm planning to go to Krakow :)
Honestly that really seems interesting. I have NEVER met a Jewish in person.
I just hope he wouldn't feel like I'm mocking him, an Arab walking towards him with a girl in hijab.

@Jon:
I really should research more about halal food and kosher similarities :)

@Paulina:
I think you are right, this is turning pretty much into society and culture rather than everyday life.

And this girl is Polish :) She's a Muslim. and she's my fiance :)
I just want to know more about life there from other points of view. I want to surprise her with lots of knowledge about the culture there :)
Paulina 9 | 1,448
14 Mar 2013  #25
Yeah I'm planning to go to Krakow :)

If you're planning to visit some churches then when in Kraków Kościół Mariacki (St. Mary's Basilica) is a must :) Also the Wawel Cathedral with tombs of Polish kings and I personally like and also recommend visiting the Church of St. Francis of Assisi's.

I think you are right, this is turning pretty much into society and culture rather than everyday life.

Oh, I didn't know you put it in the "Everyday Life" section. I wrote that because someone moved your thread to "Relationships, Marriage" section (I don't know why really).

And this girl is Polish :) She's a Muslim. and she's my fiance :)

Well then I'm sure she'll know what to wear in Poland :)

I just want to know more about life there from other points of view. I want to surprise her with lots of knowledge about the culture there :)

I've found a photo of a Polish Muslim girl living in Poland:

Polish Muslim girl

Btw, she wrote on a blog she can't wear a hijab at work so this can be a problem (I don't know if it's regulated in any way by law, it probably depends on the employer).
lol cat
14 Mar 2013  #26
Is she Muslim born or converted?
yehudi 1 | 432
14 Mar 2013  #28
The ones I'm thinking of are properly kosher.

Good to know. Next time I'm around one of those places I'll look them up.

I just hope he wouldn't feel like I'm mocking him, an Arab walking towards him with a girl in hijab.

I don't think he would feel that. But who knows?

You really never met a Jew? I've met plenty of Arabs where I live, but never a Saudi, or a Hadhrami.
Hope your first Jew turns out to be a nice guy.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
14 Mar 2013  #29
No, I'm a man. We don't wear hijab

So why do you keep your women in these things ? Would you like to see them in mini skirts ? I'm just curious.
Polson 5 | 1,771
14 Mar 2013  #30
Traditions are as 'sacred' as in Poland, Grzeg ;)


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