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Things we enjoyed as kids in Poland


skysoulmate 14 | 1,295
12 Aug 2010 #91
skysoulmate:
"cztery pancerny"

Czterej Pancerni i Pies.

Did you watch also Stawka większa niż życie? (Hans Kloss)

Yes, yes, that's the one.
Still remember the music and some lyrics
Deszcze niespokojne
... sad,
a my na tej wojnie
ładnych parę lat.

Do domu wrócimy,
w piecu napalimy,
nakarmimy psa.
...

Powrócimy wierni
my czterej pancerni,
Rudy i nasz pies....

wow, still remember...

...of course, Hans Kloss too.

Don't remember the name but there was also a program about hobbies i think and one day they talked about flying gliders and other airplanes and i think that's when i was smitten.

Very cool thread
zetigrek
12 Aug 2010 #92
Don't remember the name but there was also a program about hobbies i think and one day they talked about flying gliders and other airplanes and i think that's when i was smitten.

So you were growing up in Poland?
skysoulmate 14 | 1,295
12 Aug 2010 #93
Yes, until 7 or 8 when we moved to Sweden, then I moved to the US (my family still lives in Sweden).
Bzibzioh
13 Aug 2010 #94
Don't remember the name but there was also a program about hobbies i think and one day they talked about flying gliders and other airplanes and i think that's when i was smitten.

Adam Słodowy and "Zrób to sam" (DIY). Yes, it was amazing as he was building all those toys out of nothing.
OP pgtx 30 | 3,156
23 Aug 2010 #95
nasz pies....

Szarik!!!!

awesome dog! :)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
23 Aug 2010 #96
NorthMancPolak
RE: This was back in the days when shops used to have coin-operated sweet machines outside their premises... can you imagine how long those would stay on the wall these days??

I know this is a nostalgia thread, but what interests me the most in this quote is why the
coin-operated sweet machines would not stay on the wall these days. In other words, what factors have led to the collapse of public morality.
Sure, I've got my own ideas on the subject, but I'm interested to hear what others have to say. Incidentally, things are the same in the USA. At one time you could leave a bike out on the porch overnight. Now they'll break into your locked garage and steal your car, quad and power mower to boot.
Ironside 51 | 11,339
23 Aug 2010 #97
but I'm interested to hear what others have to say.

Lack of morality,family values and discipline under guise of freedom.
Reasons? Rule of greed and commercialism.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
23 Aug 2010 #98
If you're right, then why do people put up with it? I would would like to see my bike on the porch where I left it. Am I the only one and most of the rest are masochists who find having their bike stolen to be an interesting adventure?
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
23 Aug 2010 #99
I can't speak for Poland, only for the UK.

Unfortunately, during the past 30 years or so, we've had a society which expects freedom and rights, but without responsibility. Victims are now to blame for their misfortune, while the offender is to be pitied and "supported" - because they are a "victim of society" or something.

Examples:

1. If a woman gets raped while wearing sexy clothing, she "encouraged" it, and the judge will sentence accordingly. Whereas in a sensible society, ONLY the rapist would be blamed, as it should be.

2. If you don't put multiple locks/bars/chains etc on your house, then it's your fault you got burgled. Whereas in a sensible society, ONLY the burglar is responsible for the crime.

3. If someone breaks into your house, and you attack them because they won't leave or you feel you are in danger, then YOU go to jail. In a sensible society, there would be an ABSOLUTE right to defend yourself, your family and your property.

But not in PC EUSSR-land, oh no. Here, the criminal is a "victim", who is "oppressed/dispossessed/vulnerable/underprivileged" or whatever other inappropriate word is the PC word-of-the-month, to be applied to the common criminal to justify his crimes.

4. If you do challenge someone because you disagree with their actions (whether it's bad manners or an actual crime) you are very likely to be threatened with a "stabbing-up" or "getting capped". This is why criminal and immoral behaviour goes unchecked, because people know the consequences, and the police and legal system won't back you up - because there are simply too many yogurt-knitting social workers who don't have any idea of what real life is like.

I'm not exactly a supporter of Sharia-style punishments, but we have a legal system which is clearly against the victim, and too much on the side of the criminal.

This is why we "put up with it", because we really don't have much choice. It's quite simply safer to "keep your nose out" than risk being murdered.

Ultimately, lack of discipline in schools and at home is to blame, which was allowed to develop due to over-liberal and PC government policies.

Which brings me right back to my earlier point: everyone knows their "rights" now, but they don't want to take any responsibility for anything. And until (or if) this changes, it won't get any better here.

I'd bet a month's wages that this is one of the main reasons why British people emigrate, and who can blame them?
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
24 Aug 2010 #100
OK but in which way is it different to the "swieże mleko" I buy in bottles (and which stays good for like max. 2 weeks) ?

Niepasteryzowane hasn't been heated and can contain some pathogenic bacteria. Ordinary milk is always heated before it's filled into bottles.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteurization]Link (English)
OP pgtx 30 | 3,156
20 Sep 2010 #101
do you remember the sayings: "Chesz cukierka? Idz do Gierka. Girek ma, to ci da." or "Gierek podzielil wszystkim rowno; Ruskim-wszystko, Polsce-gowno."

;)
zetigrek
20 Sep 2010 #102
"Gierek podzielil wszystkim rowno; Ruskim-wszystko, Polsce-gowno."

I'm too young to remember such nice sayings but when I was little I was teasing my cousin by saying:
"Chcesz jabłko? Podzielimy je po równo: ty powąchasz a ja zjem" ;>>>
OP pgtx 30 | 3,156
20 Sep 2010 #103
I'm too young to remember such nice sayings but when I was little I was teasing my cousin by saying:

i'm sorry... you should close your ears while reading that...

"Chcesz jabłko? Podzielimy je po równo: ty powąchasz a ja zjem" ;>>>

it doesn't rhyme, right?

;)
nott 3 | 594
20 Sep 2010 #104
Chesz cukierka? Idz do Gierka

mamy maslo mamy serek niech nam zyje Edward Gierek
mamy maslo mamy serek NIECH NAM ZYJE EDWARD GIEREK!
MAMY MASLO MAMY SEREK NIECH NAM ZYJE EDWARD GIEREK!!

we were shouting it in some small town about midnight, and we saw two smurfs on patrol passing by. You could see they didn't know how to react :))
zetigrek
21 Sep 2010 #105
it doesn't rhyme, right?

but it's clever... and fair... ;P
A J 4 | 1,088
21 Sep 2010 #106
"Chcesz jabłko? Podzielimy je po równo: ty powąchasz a ja zjem" ;>>>

So is your real name Eve? ;)
OP pgtx 30 | 3,156
21 Sep 2010 #108
what's that?
Marek11111 9 | 816
21 Sep 2010 #109
“ niewidzialna reka “ TV program where people were helping olderly and leaving a note “ niewidzialna reka “ then the person write a letter to the program and the editor read it on air.

When we were young we had group of 3 people going around and helping older people
f stop 25 | 2,513
21 Sep 2010 #110
Things we enjoyed as kids in Poland:

summer canoe camps na Mazurach
public transportation
Sundays dinners at grandma's
camping at the foot of castle ruins
trzepak acrobatics with the local "gang"
picking bluberries or mushrooms in the forest
OP pgtx 30 | 3,156
21 Sep 2010 #111
public transportation
Sundays dinners at grandma's
camping at the foot of castle ruins
trzepak acrobatics with the local "gang"
picking bluberries or mushrooms in the forest

ohhh yeahhh....
:)
Zed - | 195
21 Sep 2010 #112
f stop made my day now :-)
f stop 25 | 2,513
21 Sep 2010 #113
;)
getting rides na furze
sitting in the tree stuffing myself śliwkami
Re: trzepak acrobatics - anyone played ślepca?
zetigrek
21 Sep 2010 #114
trzepak acrobatics with the local "gang"

yeah! trzepak rules!
Varsovian 92 | 634
21 Sep 2010 #115
I have fond memories of chanting GE - STA - PO at the Zomo lined up opposite Warsaw University.
Plastic Pole52 - | 67
22 Sep 2010 #116
I enjoyed riding around with my father in his 85 Ford Granada.It was in 1987 and there were only 5 western cars in my town at that time.And now?Everyone has western car.Szkoda gadać.Za komuny było lepiej.
Eurola 4 | 1,909
22 Sep 2010 #117
I enjoyed walking at night without fear that somebody is going to hurt me in any way...pedofiles waiting to snatch me and rape me? I don't think I knew the word for that...rape? what's that? It felt good to roam around and feel safe.
f stop 25 | 2,513
22 Sep 2010 #118
It felt good to roam around and feel safe.

I agree. And then, what happened? Did you get raped?
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
22 Sep 2010 #119
I heard it that RWPG (Rada Wzajemnej Pomocy Gospodarczej or Comecon) meant ROSJI WSIO, Polsze Gawno!
Eurola 4 | 1,909
27 Sep 2010 #120
And then, what happened?

I left for the USA...heard many scary stories, news etc and no longer wanted to walk alone at night. Why challenge my luck and put myself in any dangerous situation in Chicago?

There isn't a week going by when we hear on the news about a girl/woman being attacked when walking alone, especially at night. Too many weirdos out there.

Since I live in the suburbs for well over a decade I can keep my windows open at night and feel safe but I still would not want to take a walk all alone at 10 pm.


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