The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 100

What do you like about Poland?


skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
13 Nov 2010 #31
No matter what you do a Polish brain will work the Polish way. If it's all too happy and pink we get suspicious :)

It was not my intention to criticize America and praise Poland in one breath. It was more of an argument, or point of reference.
skysoulmate:
Remember that all we see here are some posters voicing their opinion


I'm one of them, hence "obviously".

All true and it makes sense.
-------

SzwedwPolsce:
So why don't you move back to Poland?


Because my husband doesn't want to. He does not speak Polish (and all methods of teaching it him have failed so far) and claims that the industry he is in is non existent in Poland.

It's very sad he won't consider it because unfortunately it'll probably never get better for you when it comes to living in the US. Many, many years ago I read an article about different stages of an immigrant's life and it highlighted 4 stages of the average Joe Immigrant's life, or rather the average Sven Immigrant's life as the article was in Swedish. :) I wish I could find it right now but I tried and wasn't able to, but will keep looking though.

The focus of the article was permanent immigration, those who'd moved to a new country permanently, not just for a few years.

This is what I remember about the 4 stages:

Stage 1]Everything is better in your new home country, the food tastes better, the orange juice is healthier, the sun is brighter and you're pretty excited about the future.

Stage 2]You're still pretty excited but the perfectness facade is crumbling, you start seeing things you don't understand, and/or don't like.

Stage 3]The "natives" or locals in your new home country are morons! They can't drive, have no manners, dress like slobs and the food is just despicable. Politics? Don't get me started, no one here should even have the right to vote, too stupid. How in the hell do they manage to smile when things are so miserable here?

Stage 4]The last stage is actually a combination of the last stage which is an acceptance of things being different (it's all good, you'll manage somehow) AND either the stage 2 or stage 3 depending on your personality, family situation, economical status, political views, etc., etc.

So a wealthy person would probably end up at the stages 2 & 4 in let's say the Bahamas (excited about the differences and overall satisfied) whereas a poor person would eventually reach the stages 3 & 4 (hating the differences and not so satisfied).

Likewise, if your new country has a political system you agree with you're more likely to accept your new home country; if you on the other hand vehemently disagree with the political situation, well, you'll probably always be unhappy.

My totally unscientific and ultra biased observation is that you're somewhere around stage 3 and possible 4 (some acceptance). Based on some of your previous postings here I think that if the US was to cure cancer all over the world as of tomorrow, if they came up with a way to clean up all pollution, and they eliminated starvation and poverty from every corner of the earth, you'd probably still find the US a bad country to live in.

Note, this is not a criticism of you, not at all. I simply think that the article made a lot of sense. Once your mind is made up about a country it's very difficult to change that perception. Therefore it's too bad your husband won't give Poland a chance, maybe he'd like it after all and you'd definitely love it.

Likewise, I've come to realize that maybe my perception of Poland is full of romanticism and childhood memories. Things probably weren't as rosy as I remember them (not talking about the political situation here) but I chose to cling on to them because that's what gave me comfort.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
13 Nov 2010 #32
I've come to realize that maybe my perception of Poland is full of romanticism and childhood memories.

I wonder if there's anybody who has visited Poland after a long while, let's say since they moved away, and what you think about how it has changed since you last lived there.
OP Marynka11 4 | 675
13 Nov 2010 #33
well, no hard feelings, but Americans don't like to learn new languages, they are lazy that way.... they don't like to get out of their state neither...

Let's not pull American guys into all that, they have done nothing wrong. Hubby is German :) He does some sort of 3D imaging. It's all Greek to me.

Stage 1] Everything is better in your new home country, the food tastes better, the orange juice is healthier, the sun is brighter and you're pretty excited about the future.

Boy, I was a case study on stage 1 some decade ago.

Then I think I went into a combination of stage 2 and 4. I don't think I've ever developed that many symptoms of stage 3. I do admire America despite my aversion to the general fakeness in the interpersonal contacts and despite all the Republicans. In fact I would have to start a new thread to express how many things I actually like about America. It's a great country.

If I can self-diagnose I'd have to say I've invented Stage 5. All the pro arguments are on the staying in the US side. But whenever I land in Warsaw I feel like the air is finally getting inside my lungs. Does that make sense to you? No? I understand. I'm wondering about it myself.
skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
13 Nov 2010 #34
Despite all the Republicans, huh? lol You'd hate me in real life, I believed and still believe in their ideas when I was delivering pizzas for Domino's just as I do now when I fly for a living. Of course, I haven't seen much of those ideas in practice lately but the other option is horrendous in my view. Maybe that's why I've been identifying myself with conservative libertarians lately. People always remember the bad and forget the good in politics. Republicans were the one who abolished slavery yet today most people think it's the other way around.

They too want people to do well but do not want to do it via government, historically the most corrupt institution in most countries. I won't get into a lengthy debate here on as it's absolutely pointless, there's probably a 90-10% ratio of socialists/liberals versus conservative/republicans here on PF and it usually turns into a mudslinging bonanza.

My point is that please try to look past your personal biases and see the other side as human beings trying to improve this country in a way they believe is right. They, we, are not evil, we simply believe that government run institutions most often turn corrupt.

I do what I preach, despite my conservative leanings I did vote for Obama. I was hoping for a new Ronald Reagan but got a new Jimmy Carter (in my view the worst prez this country ever had). That's ok though because the political landscape is a huge pendulum swing and I hope for something much better in 2 years.

Even though the current leadship is not what I like, but rather something you probably are more comfortable with, I still have respect for the office and by no means believe we are a socialist nation now the way many called us a fascist nation when Bush was a prez. The middle ground usually prevails.

As far as the 5th stage, maybe you're onto something. Although I'll admit the way you feel when you come to Warsaw is the way I feel when I land in Stockholm or Malmö. After all, I was raised in that country. Still feel American though, an American with an enriched background. :)
OP Marynka11 4 | 675
13 Nov 2010 #35
skysoulmate

I hope for something much better in 2 years.

Let's hope it's not going to be Sarah Palin.

As for Obama being the worst President? I just think people put too much hope into him. He is a book smart guy who stepped inside the biggest mess. Do you know the Polish saying "Z pustego i Salomon nie naleje"? Given better circumstances he would be a great president.

So do you speak Svenska?
skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
13 Nov 2010 #36
Let's hope it's not going to be Sarah Palin.

No comment but I am replying to you from Anchorage. LOL

As for Obama being the worst President? I just think people put too much hope into him. He is a book smart guy who stepped inside the biggest mess. Do you know the Polish saying "Z pustego i Salomon nie naleje"? Given better circumstances he would be a great president.

I should've explained it better, I meant Carter not Obama being the worst prez. I still have "hope" but am realizing that we're hoping for different things. Did not know the Polish saying but like it. Ironically though the same saying could've been user for GWB right after 9/11, economy floundering, a major attack that no one knew the full scope or implications of, he was vilified by many for things others presidents probably would've done too. Of course, OBH would've probably apologized to the muslims on 9/12. Ok, I'm being mean now and facetious, don't think he'd have done that but I'm a military man and Obama is highly disliked amongst many of my peers. Either way, don't want to turn this any more political than I already did.

So do you speak Svenska?

Jag pratar svenska flytande, gör du det också?? (I speak Swedish fluently, how about you?)
OP Marynka11 4 | 675
13 Nov 2010 #37
skysoulmate

Either way, don't want to turn this any more political than I already did.

Yeh, let's talk more about the "Reizen" of our old country.

Jag talar inte svenska. Jag tog bara en Clas på universitetet. Jag tycker om öl. Sjuksköterska är ett roligt ord. Tack Gud för Google Translate.
skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
13 Nov 2010 #38
Jag talar inte svenska. Jag tog bara en Clas på universitetet. Jag tycker om öl. Sjuksköterska är ett roligt ord. Tack Gud för Google Translate.

Sounds like a plan!

PS. I like beer too :)
f stop 25 | 2,513
13 Nov 2010 #39
Politics aside, my stages in a new place are ususally backwards from the ones listed.
First one is always "What the hell did I do? This is a nightmare! How can I back-paddle without loosing face and a sh!tload of money??"

Then, it's "I'll try it for x number of months/years. I can do this as long as I can keep my mouth shut and my mind open".

After that it's "hmm.. this is not so bad".
And the last one, when it's time to move on, is "I don't want to go! I love it here!"
Softsong 5 | 495
13 Nov 2010 #40
I like the hospitality of the people. My Polish grandmother was a good example of what I'd always heard about Poles. When I went to Poland ten years ago for the first time, I found it to be very true. I had made a friend in Poland (due to my interest in genealogy) and stayed with his family. They told me, "Guest in House, God in House." As they drove me back to the airport in the rain, the father said, "All Poland is crying because you leave."

They did everything to welcome me. The family even made their traditional Easter food so I could enjoy a Polish holiday even though there was no holiday when I visited. And when I looked at anything in the stores where they sold souvenirs, they wanted to buy it. I had to say I did not want anything to avoid having them spend too much money. Yet on that last day of "Easter" celebration before I left for the USA, unknown to me they had all bought gifts of things I had looked at and really wanted, but was afraid they'd buy it.

And they were not wealthy people. I had brought gifts for them, too but in three weeks in Poland I only spent $50. That's how hospitable they were!

And this past summer when I was in Poland visiting all the villages and towns where my family had roots, I asked directions when I saw a man mowing his lawn. It was one of the few very hot days I had encountered and he asked if my companion and I would like some cold water. We attempted to say we were fine, but were invited in and the wife promptly put out coffee, water, bread, cold cuts, salad and cakes! What a surprise!

So, yes...I love the hospitality of the Polish people.

PS to fstop....I believe I'd be like you if I actually moved to another country.
Polonia1 3 | 53
13 Nov 2010 #41
but were invited in and the wife promptly put out coffee, water, bread, cold cuts, salad and cakes! What a surprise!

When I was In Poland visiting friends/family or other random ppl, I noticed to every house I went to, ppl would put out ridiculous amounts of food in front of me, and expect me to eat it! People in the Highlands of Poland in noticed are far more hospitable then other areas of Poland. But yea Polish hospitality is a great thing.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
13 Nov 2010 #42
coming back to "What do you like about Poland".......sheesh....

i like going into delis and having the choice of 2,394 kinds of pork. i am a ham eater and one thing i really enjoy (and will miss) is polish ham.
Wroclaw Boy
13 Nov 2010 #43
i am a ham eater and one thing i really enjoy (and will miss) is polish ham.

me too, the choice of ham is amazing, its quite worrying to think that when i leave Poland it wont be so freely available.
skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
13 Nov 2010 #44
I like ham too but how many kinds of ham can it be??
Wroclaw Boy
13 Nov 2010 #45
how many kinds of ham can it be??

Plenty, this is just one companies product line.

Szynka Domowa is my personal favourite.
bimber94 7 | 254
13 Nov 2010 #46
Poland is the only country I know where, when your train pulls in, families greet, kiss and hug each other at the station.
skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
13 Nov 2010 #47
Plenty, this is just one companies product line.

Szynka Domowa is my personal favourite.

Wow, I guess I've been deprived. I love fish the most but enjoy all kinds of food, now I'm craving ham...
Bzibzioh
13 Nov 2010 #48
Poland is the only country I know where, when your train pulls in, families greet, kiss and hug each other at the station.

Funny you said that. I was yesterday visiting my girlfriend when her mother called. She was letting her know that her train is reaching town and she will arrive in about 45 minutes. So I asked my gf whether she needs to go to the train station and she said "What for?". Her mother who is 70 yo, had to carry a large luggage up two sets of stairs (she is coming for 2 weeks to help her when my gf is going to be recovering from a surgery). I was stunned at her selfishness: it's absolutely inconceivable for me, even as I live 20 years in Canada now.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
13 Nov 2010 #49
skysoulmate wrote:

I like ham too but how many kinds of ham can it be??

somebody earlier said 2,394 but don't quote me on that.
POLENGGGs 2 | 150
13 Nov 2010 #50
Żule

you can go out , walk down couple a blocks down the road and have a drinking matey
Ashleys mind 3 | 456
13 Nov 2010 #51
I'm not familiar with any families NOT kissing one another at the airport/ train station...?

and as for ham... we got plenty here... including Polish, Russian, German, Spanish and Italian. Yes, Delis exist outside of Poland ;)
OP Marynka11 4 | 675
13 Nov 2010 #52
and as for ham... we got plenty here... including Polish, Russian, German, Spanish and Italian

In Poland it's more like Warszawska, Wrocławska, Krakowska, Lubelska, Zakopiańska, Pułtuska, (put the city/region in the blank) ____________ska.....
poland_
13 Nov 2010 #53
What do you like about Poland

The weather,four real seasons, when its summer its hot, when its winter its real
cold.

I like the Polish sense of humour.

This must be one of the best kept secrets of Poland ?
Teffle 22 | 1,321
14 Nov 2010 #55
This must be one of the best kept secrets of Poland ?

Not at all! Observational, wry, self-deprecating - once you get to know them. I like it.

Similar to my sense of humour so could be merely narcissism rather than genuine appreciation?

I dunno. Maybe it's a question for the behavioural psychologists : )
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
14 Nov 2010 #56
Maybe it's a question for the behavioural psychologists

I think Polish humour is very similar to Irish because of influences that shaped out mentality 1.drink, 2.Catholicism and a 3.bad history.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
14 Nov 2010 #57
Yep. I agree Sean.

Out of any nationality that I have had reasonable experience of: e.g. French, Spanish, English, American, Dutch - there has been less of a need to "explain" certain cultural references/implications/innuendos/human foibles etc with Poles, despite an occasional language barrier.

Just spent the evening with 7 Poles + 3 Irish. Great night.
poland_
16 Nov 2010 #58
Just spent the evening with 7 Poles + 3 Irish. Great night.

So it didn't turn out to be a " Pity party" lol.
The majority of Poles are a good bunch - i have become a little insensitive to the whining on about, " Poland and injustice after WW2" I more about the here and know, onwards and upwards...
OP Marynka11 4 | 675
16 Nov 2010 #59
Pity party

There will never be a pity party with 7 Poles :)
+ 3 Irish? Imagine how fun it must have been. Hope they didn't drive afterward.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
16 Nov 2010 #60
Hope they didn't drive afterward.

Well I know for a fact the Irish guys didn't but it was the Poles I was worried about!

No news is good news so I guess everything turned out OK and that the arguments as to who was driving were all settled amicably : )

" Pity party"

I don't even get this BTW ?!


Home / Life / What do you like about Poland?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.