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K+M+B-2012 - formula on flats in Poland


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
6 Jan 2012 #1
This formula has appeared over their doorways of milions of Polish flats, as Poles inscribe the presumed names of the Three Kings with chalk blessed in church on the Epiphany.

Such piousd practices including the opłatek sharing, blessing of Easter baskets and blessing of newlweds-to-be by their parents before heading for church are enriching, heart-warming touches that set Poland apart from re-zoologised socieities wallowing in sterile, secularist, materialist scum.
Harry
6 Jan 2012 #2
This formula has appeared over their doorways of milions of Polish flats, as Poles inscribe the presumed names of the Three Kings with chalk blessed in church on the Epiphany.

A friend of mine got so fed up with the neighbours putting it on his door every year that he painted an upside down pentagram on his door. They took the hint.

sterile, secularist, materialist scum.

Bit harsh to call Polonia secularist.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,730
6 Jan 2012 #3
Of course, Polonius doesn't live in Poland. In fact, he's never lived in Poland.

What makes his post especially cute is that he completely fails to mention whether he has it on his own American door.
ShawnH 8 | 1,498
6 Jan 2012 #4
Bit harsh to call Polonia secularist.

Generalizations....

Some are, Some aren't.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
6 Jan 2012 #5
Of course, Polonius doesn't live in Poland. In fact, he's never lived in Poland.

The OP's place of residence has no bearing upon the topic of this thread. You need to stop trying to take thread's off-topic Delphiandomine or you will be suspended again.
Harry
6 Jan 2012 #6
The OP's place of residence has no bearing upon the topic of this thread.

Actually it does: if he had been to Poland in the last decade, he'd know how quickly this inscription is becoming a thing of the past.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,730
6 Jan 2012 #7
The OP's place of residence has no bearing upon the topic of this thread. You need to stop trying to take thread's off-topic Delphiandomine or you will be suspended again.

Mods?

This formula has appeared over their doorways of milions of Polish flats, as Poles inscribe the presumed names of the Three Kings with chalk blessed in church on the Epiphany.

Actually, "millions" is a bit of an overstatement. You'll rarely see it in modern developments, and in older developments, those with their own doors (rather than the original) tend to shun it as well. I'm thinking of several of my neighbours - my flat was built in the 80's, and you'll only find this chalked on the "old" doors.

To someone who has actually been in Poland at all (ie, not you Polonius/Des) - have you ever seen this chalked on a "new" flat door?

Such piousd practices including the opłatek sharing, blessing of Easter baskets and blessing of newlweds-to-be by their parents before heading for church are enriching, heart-warming touches that set Poland apart from re-zoologised socieities wallowing in sterile, secularist, materialist scum.

Opłatek sharing has little to do with religion these days in Poland - it's becoming a secular tradition very quickly.

As for the final part of your post - why don't you live in Poland, rather than living in a country full of "sterile, secularist, materialist scum"?

(incidentally - Poles are as materialist as they come. You have seen the mass of disgustingly garish big houses in the Polish countryside, right?)
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
6 Jan 2012 #8
Mods?

^Hahahahaha

Actually, "millions" is a bit of an overstatement.

Have you counted?

if he had been to Poland in the last decade, he'd know how quickly this inscription is becoming a thing of the past.

Really are you the smarmy British expatriate Argus with the ability to view all of the door jambs in the whole of Poland?
delphiandomine 83 | 17,730
6 Jan 2012 #9
smarmy British expatriate Argus

More flaming.

Mods?
Harry
6 Jan 2012 #10
To someone who has actually been in Poland at all (ie, not you Polonius/Des) - have you ever seen this chalked on a "new" flat door?

Actually I have. There's an old woman who lives in my block who has it on her new door. But she only has a new door because her son (who I assume will be inheriting the flat when she dies) appears to give her home improvements as Christmas presents (she got a new uPVC window for a couple of years and a new door another year).
teflcat 5 | 1,032
6 Jan 2012 #11
To someone who has actually been in Poland at all (ie, not you Polonius/Des) - have you ever seen this chalked on a "new" flat door?

It used to be chalked up a lot more than nowadays, that's for sure. btw I was a little surprised to hear that people give the opłatek to their dogs. Apparently you can buy special coloured ones for the purpose.
Ironside 48 | 9,844
6 Jan 2012 #12
Apparently you can buy special coloured ones for the purpose.

for animals not exclusively for dogs.

he'd know how quickly this inscription is becoming a thing of the past.

Say in two - three doors in ten.
Harry
6 Jan 2012 #13
Say in two - three doors in ten.

It'll depend on where we're talking about. Generally, more old people = more inscriptions.

But a decade ago it was noticeably more common.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
6 Jan 2012 #14
Such piousd practices including the opłatek sharing, blessing of Easter baskets and blessing of newlweds-to-be by their parents before heading for church are enriching

no WONDER the world is going to hell lately. it's obviously due to a lack of wafer swapping and tap water dispersal.

Polonius3 for president, Santorum as his running mate.
pip 10 | 1,661
6 Jan 2012 #15
I would add that it is seen more in the smaller towns and villages and less in the cities. I lived in a new block and I did see it. I think 2 to 3 out of 10 is quite accurate. In my osiedle in Warsaw I have not seen it- I live in an osiedle with 20 houses- but my previous osiedle which had 90 houses had probably about 40 doors with this on it.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
6 Jan 2012 #16
re-zoologised socieities wallowing in sterile, secularist, materialist scum.

Not everyone bothers with that. And most who do don't live up to it.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
6 Jan 2012 #17
re-zoologised socieities wallowing in sterile, secularist, materialist scum

A really heart-warming comment from someone who is evidently filled with brotherly love. A true Christian.
Harry
6 Jan 2012 #18
I think 2 to 3 out of 10 is quite accurate.

Anybody know how common it is for Poles who are outside Poland to put K+M+B-[year] on their doors? More than 20 to 30% or less than that? I'd be guessing from the way that they vote that it would be more but I've never lived in a Polish community outside Poland.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
6 Jan 2012 #19
In some villages it was a way of saying "We're not (any more, at least) the J word." A virtual anti-Mezuzah.
Wedle 16 | 496
6 Jan 2012 #20
he'd know how quickly this inscription is becoming a thing of the past.

I think 2 to 3 out of 10 is quite accurate.

I live in a high end Rezydencja in Warsaw there are a total of 22 Villa apartments, the residents are made up of Polish intelligentsia, foreign diplomats and business people. At least 60% have the blessing ' Christus Mansionem Benedicat ' on their doors. Furthermore I have just returned from the Stare Miasto with my family, after visiting church for the Epiphany service, we spoke to the priest and he informed us that all over Warsaw the services have seen larger than average gatherings. So lets just keep to the facts, more people are actually coming back to the church especially in these times of economic uncertainty, just because you have not seen the blessings on the exterior doors, does not mean the houses have not been blessed, the local priest will visit over the next two weeks, and will conduct a blessing of the house while there, so some people choose not to put the inscription on their doors.

So for you non Polish Atheists in Poland, ask yourself a simple question, how many Polish family homes have you visited and not seen, some form religious insignia ? I do not know one.Then again I do not mix with people who are involved in trendy lifestyles and are fashionably against the church...

Such piousd practices including the opłatek sharing, blessing of Easter baskets and blessing of newlweds-to-be by their parents before heading for church are enriching, heart-warming touches that set Poland apart

Polonious3, you are 100% correct, Polish traditions are what set Poland apart from other countries, although Poland is very materialistic as well.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
6 Jan 2012 #21
the local priest will come around over the next two weeks

Is 50zł still ok or should I offer more, inflation being what it is and all?
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
6 Jan 2012 #22
In many cases a purely technical factor comes into play -- the Three Kings inscription is seen more commonly on dark-coloured wooden door frames where it is plainly visible. On the white PVC door frames it is invisible and apparently no-one in the Chruch has thought of introducing coloured chalk to remedy the situation. Reckon I'll have to mention it to Primate Kowlaczyk.
Harry
6 Jan 2012 #23
On the white PVC door frames it is invisible and apparently no-one in the Chruch has thought of introducing coloured chalk to remedy the situation.

They just chalk it on the door in these parts.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
6 Jan 2012 #24
Half of the people who let them do it aren't remotely religious but don't want gossip and an earbashing from the priest's post-menopausal fan club who come round the block with him while he's doing it - more to see inside their neighbours's homes than any act of faith.
Wedle 16 | 496
6 Jan 2012 #25
Is 50zł still ok or should I offer more, inflation being what it is and all?

As I understand in Poland,you give what you can afford there is no set fee.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
6 Jan 2012 #26
Ha! My friends moved to Skierniewice and the wife came home from work to find the priest interrogating her husband about their household income and standing there with a calculator telling him how much they have to pay. And some people actually fall for that!
Wedle 16 | 496
6 Jan 2012 #27
Half of the people who let them do it aren't remotely religious but don't want gossip and an earbashing from the priest's post-menopausal fan club who come round the block with him while he's doing it - more to see inside their neighbours's homes than any act of faith.

I don't know what you are talking about here JonnyM, it is only the priest that visits your home, there is no gathering,someone in the building arranges the time for the neighbors and he visits everyone individually, it is a private blessing for the household only.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
6 Jan 2012 #28
it is only the priest that visits your home, there is no gathering,

Not in my block - there's a crowd of coffin dodging old bags and their long-suffering husbands who come with him.
Wedle 16 | 496
6 Jan 2012 #29
Ha! My friends moved to Skierniewice and the wife came home from work to find the priest interrogating her husband about their household income and standing there with a calculator telling him how much they have to pay. And some people actually fall for that!

I think a lot of people talk sh1t about what the church expects, I have also heard that it is a ' shame on you ' to give anything less than 20 PLN per family when visiting church on Sundays. As a family of four we give the small change we have in our pockets, normally between 5-10 PLN. We assist other families through the church, who have real needs, not because we feel morally bound to do it, more because we want to do it.

I have also been at dinner parties and having drinks with Polish people, when they start to joke about what the priest requested, I have never experienced that in Poland so I can't confirm or deny, although I think mostly it is just ' tall stories'.

Not in my block - there's a crowd of coffin dodging old bags and their long-suffering husbands who come with him.

We have had different experience's in Poland, your experience sounds more like being on the receiving end ' Hyacinth Bucket ' from keeping up appearances.
Harry
6 Jan 2012 #30
although I think mostly it is just ' tall stories'.

The thing about priests in Poland is that they represent a cross section of the male society, so there will inevitably be good ones and bad ones. And equally inevitably, the bad ones will draw more attention than the good ones.


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