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Blood donation in Poland


kazalina 7 | 12
14 Mar 2011  #1
I would like to donate blood in Poland, as I now live here, does anyone know where I might find out more information.

Many thanks
Harry
14 Mar 2011  #2
Where exactly in Poland are you?
Olaf 6 | 956
14 Mar 2011  #3
Very good idea! Just type "RCKIK" into google and find one in your city. If you're in Krakow then there is a very nice place at Rzeznicza street, where I go every 2 months or so. Funny as it is, the name of the street means butcher street and they deal with blood there:) - apart from the funny coincidence, the staff, the equipment and interiors etc. are top shelf.
OP kazalina 7 | 12
14 Mar 2011  #4
Thank you Olaf I will check out the website and get myself down to Rzeznica street soon :)
Olaf 6 | 956
14 Mar 2011  #5
Voila!
rckik.krakow.pl
No English version but it should do.
If you have any questions maybe I can help.
mujisushi - | 7
14 Mar 2011  #6
I was interested in donating blood in Wroclaw and was unable to. The facility said that unless I was able to speak and read polish I could not file out the necessary forms or speak with the nurse. They would not allow translation and did not have english versions : /
Anie21 - | 1
5 Nov 2015  #7
Merged: Blood Donation

Hi, i would like to donate blood in Poland, In Wroclaw. Could you tell me where can i go? Or how can i search info about blood donation?
kpc21 1 | 763
6 Nov 2015  #8
The Regional Centre of Blood Donation and Blood Treatment: rckik.wroclaw.pl
InPolska 11 | 1,821
6 Nov 2015  #9
Don't they have conditions? I seriously doubt that just anybody can donate blood in Poland. What about homosexuals, for instance? Someone says that a functional knowledge of Polish is demanded and it makes sense to me. It is crucial that the concerned people do understand the requirements as it can be very dangerous if sick people donate blood (I would not want to receive it ;))
Chemikiem 6 | 1,781
6 Nov 2015  #10
I am sure they would ask a potential donor about their medical history InPolska, as yes, not everyone is suitable to donate blood.
The blood would be screened first anyway. Those with HIV, Hep C for example, would not be allowed to donate blood.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
6 Nov 2015  #11
@Chemi! Absolutely and that's also the reason why they demand that applicants to donate their blood are functional in Polish as it needs to be clear to doctors whether the applicant is suitable. This is a serious matter and personally (I had to undergo a 3-hour operation here some years ago) I would not want to receive blood from someone who could not have been screened thoroughly because they were not able to communicate in local (here, Polish then) language. As to homosexuals, I suppose they may not give their blood in Poland and once again, the applicant if foreigner needs to be able to function in local language.
kpc21 1 | 763
6 Nov 2015  #12
I have no idea, how it is in reality. But the person checking if you satisfy the conditions, interviewing you, is probably a doctor. A doctor, as an educated person, should be able to speak English. Still, it might be a good idea to come with someone who speaks Polish as a translator.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,781
6 Nov 2015  #13
I would not want to receive blood from someone who could not have been screened thoroughly because they were not able to communicate in local (here, Polish then) language.

Even if they could not communicate effectively, screening tests are pretty thorough, at least in the UK, and I can't imagine Poland not screening for the same diseases/viruses the UK does.

If someone turned up to donate blood without being able to speak Polish, also presuming that a person would not be able to complete necessary paperwork, I am sure blood would not be taken.

This is what blood is screened for in the UK :
blood.co.uk/resources/leaflets/tests-on-your-blood
delphiandomine 83 | 17,596
6 Nov 2015  #14
A doctor, as an educated person, should be able to speak English.

It's not allowed. You need to be able to communicate in Polish. They don't demand fluency, but you need to be able to do everything yourself without the assistance of others.
Tartar 1 | 22
15 Dec 2015  #15
Just in case you are from the UK; interest fact is that if you lived in the UK during the mad cow outbreak, they will NOT accept blood donations from you..
jon357 63 | 14,110
15 Dec 2015  #16
And ironically drinking the spinal fluid of 100 infected cows would probably harm you less than eating a cheap kielbasa.

Blood transfusion authorities are entitled to make whatever rules they like - most however screen the blood.
kpc21 1 | 763
16 Dec 2015  #17
And at the same time they are claiming that they have shortages of blood...
samthelearner
16 Aug 2017  #18
Today my polish friend called the Regional blood center in Bydgoszcz and enquired if I can donate blood.

Regional Blood Center: "He cannot donate the blood as he is not fluent in Polish"
My friend: "But I can come and translate for him"
Regional Blood Center: "We cannot allow translators and donor should understand the questions and answer to use directly during evaluation"
My friend: "Don't you have even single staff who can speak English?"
Regional Blood Center: "Sorry, we don't"
Roger5 1 | 1,458
16 Aug 2017  #19
Lightweights. I've gone the whole hog with a complete body donation.
jon357 63 | 14,110
16 Aug 2017  #20
a complete body donation.

Me too. But they'll have to wait for it, for as long as I can manage - until Philip Morris in a grim reaper outfit sends them the item.

"We cannot allow translators and donor should understand the questions and answer to use directly during evaluation"

Probably worth just turning up. Snippy receptionists in PL often just make things up off the top of their heads - they like to say no and are used to people who argue with them.
Roger5 1 | 1,458
16 Aug 2017  #21
Philip Morris

I'm ashamed to say that I'll have the same courier.


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