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Polish history as a school subject in western Europe


Archysski 1 | 6
7 Apr 2012  #1
In advance, I apologize for my spelling mistakes, but hope you bear with it because the english language is not something I use daily.

But I have a question for you who grew up in western europe.
Did you have anything about Poland or eastern europe in your history class during school?

I grew up with the Danish school system, and none of my history classes taught eastern european history. I can, after many years only note that the same thing is going on today.

I am interested in how to integrate Europe, if we exclude such an important teaching about each other? Or is it only the Danish school system that still live in the cold war, since they stay behind the berlin wall.. ?
pawian 161 | 9,916
7 Apr 2012  #2
The only historic things about Denmark which are taught in Polish schools are:

1. Polish/English class - Hamlet, the Prince of Denmark.

2. History class - the participation of Polish army in the liberation of Denmark from Swedish occupation in 17 century. Stefan Czarniecki swam across the Danish bay on his horse and it was immortalised in the Polish national anthem.

Anything else that Polish students should know about Denmark?
OP Archysski 1 | 6
7 Apr 2012  #3
Well I hope you heard something about some vikings.

But don't you think its wrong that danish students doesn't know anything about eastern europe, and therefor can not relate to a big part of the continent ?
pawian 161 | 9,916
7 Apr 2012  #4
Well I hope you heard something about some vikings.

Oh, yes, sorry me! But to be honest, I tend to associate Vikings with today`s Norway or Sweden. :):)

But don't you think its wrong that danish students doesn't know anything about eastern europe, and therefor can not relate to a big part of the continent ?

It works the other way too. Polish students know nothing about Denmark unless:

1. They study Scandinavian languages at Polish universities.
2. They have student exchanges with Danish schools.
OP Archysski 1 | 6
7 Apr 2012  #5
Oh, yes, sorry me! But to be honest, I tend to associate Vikings with today`s Norway or Sweden. :):)

Well it was the danish vikings who invaded half of England back then, but okay Sweden and Norway gets the price.

It works the other way too. Polish students know nothing about Denmark unless:

I don't care how much you know about Denmark, but correct me if I'm wrong, you did hear something about the French revolution, Spain and England right ? And that gave you a picture of those countries today, where they are from and where they are today. Or did they only teach you about Poland, the Russian revolution and Yugoslavia ?
Hipis - | 227
7 Apr 2012  #6
I was born and raised in England and all I was taught in school about Poland was how "easily" we were invaded at the start of WW2 and how we all became communists after the war.
pawian 161 | 9,916
7 Apr 2012  #7
I don't care how much you know about Denmark,

I know a lot.

E.g., long ago, cans with mediocre Danish ham

imitated excellent Polish ham cans

you did hear something about the French revolution, Spain and England right ?

Spain and England during French Revolution? Yes, I heard something about them. Napoleon invaded France on English and Spanish orders.

Or did they only teach you about Poland, the Russian revolution and Yugoslavia ?

Russian Revolution? You mean this one in 1991? When communism was toppled?

Hey, hey, why are you so focused on Revolutions?
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
7 Apr 2012  #8
Did you have anything about Poland or eastern europe in your history class during school?

Yes, Poland was invaded by germany, britain then went to war,end of.

Oh, yes, sorry me! But to be honest, I tend to associate Vikings with today`s Norway or Sweden. :):)

Cheeky bugger, never heard of Danelaw? Dane Geld? No,why should you have lol.....Basically,the Danish Norsmen were the hardest Vikingers :) Norway were the late comers and,frankly,a bit crap :)

So, OP, no, in England we were not taught much about Poland beyond WW2. Russia got a lot of attention though.
pawian 161 | 9,916
7 Apr 2012  #9
Poland was invaded by germany, britain

I heard about Germany but why was Poland invaded by Britain?

I thought Britain invaded America.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
7 Apr 2012  #10
Why was Poland invaded by Britain?

Britain was invaded by Poland... Bonnie Prince charlie was the great-great grandson of Jan Sobieski III
OP Archysski 1 | 6
7 Apr 2012  #12
I was born and raised in England and all I was taught in school about Poland was how "easily" we were invaded at the start of WW2 and how we all became communists after the war.

That's my point. The danes even claim that they had all the brave fighters during the WW2... Really ?

But again, people are mocking Poland/eastern Europe because of ignorance.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
7 Apr 2012  #13
To be fair Archysski, every school boy in Britain knows about Polish Pilots in the Battle of Britain,and those interested in war history tend to know about Monte Cassino etc.

But,as for formal education, Poland has played very little part in our History,culture or anything else so its not surprising its not taught about in schools.
OP Archysski 1 | 6
7 Apr 2012  #14
imitated excellent Polish ham cans

Good to know that somebody out there is checking cans of ham.

But,as for formal education, Poland has played very little part in our History,culture or anything else so its not surprising its not taught about in schools.

Glad to hear. What about King Sobieski and his fight against the Ottomans who tried to conquer Austria and move further on ? But my point isn't that you should know every detail about Poland, just a basic knowledge about the countries in the east, since we are in the same union now.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
8 Apr 2012  #15
Cheeky bugger, never heard of Danelaw? Dane Geld? No,why should you have lol.....Basically,the Danish Norsmen were the hardest Vikingers :)

Well Canute was a 1/2 Polish and the other 1/2 Danish i think, so there is a bit of Polish/Danish association, but very few people would know about it.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
8 Apr 2012  #16
I studied history until I finished school in the mid 00s.

Ancient Celts- Strongbows Invasion- Cromwell- Penal Laws- French Rev- Irish Rebellion of 1798- Franco Prussian War- Rise of Nationalism- WW1- Irish Rebellion of 1916- War of Independence- Irish Civil War- Brief Aftermath- WW2- Aftermath- Ireland during and after the war- Cold War.

This is the basics of the curriculum. Needless to say, anyone with an interest in history would p*ss the test.

I attended a soccer game the night before the exam and got an A2(honours). I drank at least seven pints and an x pill that night and still p*ssed through the test the next morning.

Absolute joke of a curriculum and one heavily influenced by Catholic nationalists.

A lot of factually incorrect opinions given as fact, too.

Our teachers more or less told us what they expected to come up on the paper and after twenty plus years experience, they were often right.

Anyone, with average intelligence can obtain 400 points on their final exams(leaving certificate) in my country. That a 66.66% average. Just by attending most classes and putting two hours worth of work in at home.

Joke shop.

Ive heard great things about Finlands education system. It is yielding great results.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_Finland

I can still recite poems in Irish and Latin, off by heart. But I would have to look up a couple of the Latin words as I forget what some mean!
Specjalista 3 | 43
23 Apr 2012  #17
Did you have anything about Poland or eastern europe in your history class during school?

A little but not much. So little I barely remember it.

The level of ignorance about Poland in the UK is generally high and most couldn't find it on a map without help or time.

I've been told that Poland is near the North Pole hence it's name and that it's constantly covered in snow.
Sebastian 6 | 108
23 Apr 2012  #18
I don't know about Western Europe, but in Canada, in high school, only a few European countries are discussed in classes. Poland was rarely mentioned in my history classes. BUT, most European countries weren't mentioned either. In my old high school history classes, only UK, France, Germany, Russia, Spain, were studied, and when it came to Greece, it was only ancient Greece. Many Western European countries aren't in the history classes either. Holland, Norway, Iceland, Sweden, etc were not even mentioned. The Baltic countries, Slovenia, Former Yugoslav countries, Czech Republic, other Former Soviet countries were barely mentioned. So its not just Polish history thats left out. Its most of Europe thats left out. But to be honest, I am not surprised. I mean, if you compare British and French history, to Latvian or Estonian history, there is no comparison. Latvia does not really have much history, and it is very irrelevant throughout history, I mean they didn't really make any contributions to European society, or the world. While UK and France had massive influence throughout European History, and the world.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
24 Apr 2012  #19
Holland,

Thats a pity, there are parts of Holland where a Canadian still doesnt have to pay for a Beer if you turn up in May. Seriously,like the parts that roll out the red carpet for Poles ,Holland has the same for Canadians for the 1945 liberations.
BBman - | 344
24 Apr 2012  #20
the danes even claim that they had all the brave fighters during the WW2... Really ?

They bravely fought in the SS....
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
24 Apr 2012  #21
And the 24th Panzer Penal Battalion.... ;)
(was Sven Hassle big with school boys across the atlantic?)
Archyski - | 45
24 Apr 2012  #22
I mean they didn't really make any contributions to European society,

I can't speak for Letvia or Estonia. But I know as a fact, that the poles had a great influence throughout Europe.

for example, King Sobieski who fought and won against the invadning Turks during the battle of Vienna in 1683. The Pope and other foreign dignitaries hailed Sobieski as the "Savior of Vienna and Western European civilization" as I quote.

Another example, the Polish army fought back the Soviet invasion in 1920. The soviets sent nearly 800,000 men to In order to conquer Poland and then proceed to spread communism to Western Europe. Two great examples of how the Poles had a major influence in European history.
oxon 4 | 164
24 Apr 2012  #23
I think it only correct and fitting that any Polish children taking advantage of western education whilst their parents collect child benefits, claim job seekers allowance and have their rents paid for should learn some Polish history. In fact, they should have one to one translators paid for by UK (or where ever) tax payers so they can truly grasp how great their Polish nation was/is whilst they reap the benefits of a generous welfare system which was designed for the local labour.

And don't forget to teach the Polish children all about their race rights. If any cheeky local kids start to call them derogatory names make sure that the Polish kids know how to dial 999 to report hate speech.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
24 Apr 2012  #24
make sure that the Polish kids know how to dial 999 to report hate speech.

Its 101 for non emergency reporting you plum. Dont you know anything about England? Shamefull,call yourself an Englishman? Tsk......


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