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I'm English, but I really like some Polish names. Can I use them for my baby girl?


ldawson
11 Mar 2014  #1
My fiance and I are getting married next year. When we're married, we hopefully will be able to have children in the future. We have discussed different names that we like.

Although we're both English, I really love the name 'Zofia' with the nickname 'Zosia'. Do you think we can call our daughter that? Will people think that we are strange because she'll have a Polish name? I know that it would be easier to call her 'Sophia' which is more international, but I don't think it's as interesting, and I couldn't call her 'Zosia' either (which I really like).

I'd like to know your thoughts.
dorog
11 Mar 2014  #2
well, I'm Poles and I really don't like when people here name their children with foreign names. It's sound stupid with polish surnames. I think it work the same in British.
Harry
11 Mar 2014  #3
well, I'm Poles and I really don't like when people here name their children with foreign names.

Er, Polish people in Poland cannot give their children foreign names; only names on the approved list can be used.
smurf 39 | 1,983
11 Mar 2014  #4
I image that the village will rise up against you and your other half and following a hilarious chase through the town's land (involving pitchforks and oil lamps and the odd blood-thirsty hound) they may very well lynch you and your fair lady from the oldest oak tree in said town's land unless you and her retract the offensive name from the town's birth register.

Or in reality......no, nobody will care........except the grandparents.......grandparents are always a wee bit annoyed when a new arrival isn't called after them ^_^

Then again, the kid might get bullied for having a weirdly-spelt version of Sophia for a name, but so what, it'll toughen her up for the eventuality of life being one crushing defeat followed by the next.........unless you live in a place that's pretty multi-culture'd then nobody will care coz there'll already be an abundance of mad names in school.

Er, Polish people in Poland cannot give their children foreign names; only names on the approved list can be used.

Like Beyonce and Chantelle :P

Or Nigel, Nigel's a lovely name...with a name like Nigel a kid living in Poland would have to grow up to become a professional UFC fighter......or a priest :(
Lenka 2 | 1,068
11 Mar 2014  #5
Er, Polish people in Poland cannot give their children foreign names; only names on the approved list can be used.

Tell that to all the Michaels, Nicoles and so on :)
Jardinero 1 | 395
11 Mar 2014  #6
Personally, I like that. But it may lead to a bit of confusion if someone assumes that since your given name is X you must hail form Y... Similarly, there has been a trend for English sounding names in Poland, or 'neutral' sounding names for Polish children born in the English speaking world (Wiktoria, Julia, Damian, Dawid), but in Poland its now back to the more 'traditional' Polish names like Zofia, Antoni, Jan, Jędrzej, etc...

I was once at a playground in the UK, and overheard a parent calling out: "Radek! Radek!". We later had a chat, and it turned out that the parents were both British, had no Polish ancestors, but had lived in Poland and really liked the name. I thought that was neat...

Good luck with choosing... ;-)
dorog
12 Mar 2014  #7
What about name Jaś Pierre Giorgio or Alex with x not "ks" it's sounds funny Alex Gruszka isn't it?
BohdanBazooka - | 24
15 Mar 2014  #8
Er, Polish people in Poland cannot give their children foreign names; only names on the approved list can be used.

Unless you're a popular pop star, like Michał Wiśniewski ;)
Klo 1 | 21
16 Mar 2014  #9
I was really worried about that 3 years ago when I was having a baby, but when we went to register a very anglo name it wasn't a problem. The woman told me that those rules no longer apply. A hyphenated last name on the other hand, is a little more tricky. But doable.

As for little Zosia, I don't think people will care that much, you may just get a lot of people asking, "Oh, are you are your husband Polish?"
Sparks11 - | 335
16 Mar 2014  #10
I totally agree with Smurf. The lynching scenario is most likely. Your child is the center of the world and many people will be looking to it for guidance in these troubled times. Choosing the perfect name, one which reflects both your creativity and the child's uniqueness is of absolute importance to the human race. It is also paramount that you balance this with the traditions of your homeland and deference to respected social norms. Tread carerfully, the future depends on this...
Jimmu 2 | 157
23 Mar 2014  #11
Move to California and you'll have no problems.
Chelba
23 Mar 2014  #12
You can name your child whatever you wish. Heck we have many African Americans that name their child BLUE, or WEST.
how about Apple?

Yes there are countries - not here- that the child name MUST be one that is on an approved list.

What if you have a baby boy? Now that's where you should not name him Zosia.

For girls there are so many names - my niece is Malgorzata - or Malgosia for short.

Their is Janina or Jasia for short. Krystyna or Krysia for short. Agniewska or Aga for short. Irena or Irena.

Good luck.
gucio
23 Mar 2014  #13
I think all of these opinions miss a few important points, such as what it is that a name is for? If parents have a care for their offspring, other than a "feather" in the cap, then they should weigh in mind how easy the name will be to pronounce, write, or call out, for those who live around their offspring. All sensible folks understand that all humans enjoy hearing their name spoken.Even frequently. So if your child has an odd name he will be denied the comfort of hearing his name used, and spoken. It may be twisted or shortened in spelling by peers. And what for?Parent who endow their offsprings with "impressive" names are selfish and unimaginative in forgetting how it affects childs ability to blend into social fabric.
Jimmu 2 | 157
23 Mar 2014  #14
You have two choices. Name them something mundane and have them hate you for it, or name them something exotic and have them hate you for it.
CoachTrip - | 2
1 May 2014  #15
I don't think people would necessarily realise it's a Polish name - I didn't know it was specifically from the country. But I think you should name your children whatever you want and not worry what other people think.
Cookie Lea - | 2
26 May 2014  #16
I think Zosia will be fine in England! there are no Polish characters, so there will be no problems when filling out forms. Zosia is a much better name than some of the more 'popular' names I see these days! like Skyler, Nevaeh, Kayden...

I have a name ready for when I have a baby with my Polish partner. A girl will be Milena (no problems there) or for a boy I am in love with Michał. I am a little worried about this one, as I would pronounce it the Polish way, and I would not want the child to get bullied in school. One nasty friend said that is sounds like a cat saying 'meeow' :\
Wulkan - | 3,255
27 May 2014  #17
I am a little worried about this one, as I would pronounce it the Polish way, and I would not want the child to get bullied in school.

Don't worry, the kids in school will call him Michael / Mike regardless how you call him.

I think Zosia will be fine in England! there are no Polish characters,

It would be just mispronaunced 'Zoshah', English 'sh' is not Polish 'si', it might not make a difference to you if you're English but for Polish speakers seeing English woman calling her daughter 'Zoshah' which supposed to be Polish 'Zosia' would be just silly and funny.
Rafal - | 25
27 May 2014  #18
zofia (sophia) is not polish but greek name means wisdom/knowledge
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
27 May 2014  #19
Just call her Sophie - far simpler
Jimmu 2 | 157
27 May 2014  #20
It would be just mispronaunced 'Zoshah', English 'sh' is not Polish 'si',

How many native English speakers can even hear the difference between Kasia and Kasza?
Wulkan - | 3,255
27 May 2014  #21
That's exactly what I mean. For them: 'sz' 'si' 'ś' is just 'sh' xD
haloUK
16 Oct 2014  #22
The english 'sh' is actually closer to 'si' than 'sz' - and people do learn how to pronounce names
Wulkan - | 3,255
16 Oct 2014  #23
The english 'sh' is actually closer to 'si' than 'sz'

Thruth

and people do learn how to pronounce names

Not from my experience, most English people pronounce foreign names the way it suits them without thinking if it's correct nor if it's hurting somebody's feelings.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
17 Oct 2014  #24
to be honest it depends where you intend to live with your child.

If you will be in London then go for it.

On the other hand if you are in the provinces I wouldnt do it, it will just be a pain.

My two sisters have traditional Irish names which was no problem in London but really annoying when they moved to the country.

Mind you even if your name is Jane Smith you would have to spell it out for the majority of people.

I really liked Zosia too and called my daughter Sophie. These days she would like to change it to Zosia but that is up to her.
Gabi112
2 Dec 2014  #25
I'm Polish, and 1 of the common names is Gabriela/Gabrysia and Gabi for short :-)


Home / Life / I'm English, but I really like some Polish names. Can I use them for my baby girl?
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