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Poland three year residency



raheelrais 1 | 1    
6 Apr 2015  #1

Hello,

i just want to know that recently i visit to Poland on Schengen visa and then i apply for a residency card when i go to the ministry for my fingerprints i got stamp on my passport from Poland ministry Warsaw and i receive 2 paper they said you can receive your residency card after 45 days from our office. So i would like to know how many years that residency card they will give me or what kind of that residency card temporary or EU? And whats the benefits of it.

Kindly experienced people reply please.

Thank you
Regards


Looker - | 935    
6 Apr 2015  #2

At the moment you may apply only for a temporary residence card in Poland. It is given for a period of max. three years (and it depends on what basis this permit has been issued).

This card makes the stay in Poland legal and entitles to re-crossing Polish border without a visa. If you want to work in Poland you must apply for the temp. residence and work permit.

migrant.info.pl/residence-card.html
OP raheelrais 1 | 1    
7 Apr 2015  #3

Hello,

Thanks for your reply. Its means that card is temporary for 3 years only legally stay or re-crossing Polish border without a visa.
so i can not use that card on all Schengen state for visiting without Schengen visa ?
and one more question on which residence card i can apply for Polish citizenship after 5 years? on this same card i can apply for Polish citizenship after 5 years? or i should change with residence and work permit card?

kindly reply sir please.

Thank you
Looker - | 935    
8 Apr 2015  #4

i can not use that card on all Schengen state for visiting without Schengen visa ?

When you own this card you can visit other Schengen countries under the following conditions:
- you must have a valid travel document,
- you possess an insurance which is valid for the entire period of your travel, and which is valid in Schengen area,
- you have to provide the reasons of your travel, conditions of stay and show proof of having sufficient funds,

on which residence card i can apply for Polish citizenship

Migrant.info site shows, that it's enough to stay in Poland three years on the permanent resident card, and it have to be an uninterrupted stay. Of course the other conditions must also be fulfilled, like having a stable source of income in Poland and a legal tittle to the place of living (it can be an rental agreement).
singhyuvi    
21 Apr 2017  #5

Dear Sir

I am an indian citizen want to settle in poland with family can i apply Temporary residency from inside the poland on tourist visa and whats the proceeder ?

thanks
yuvi singh
greejo123 - | 3    
21 Apr 2017  #6

Hello,
I am an Indian . Actually I would like to know that if I got a student visa for 2 year , can I get any part time job in Poland without knowing polish language.? Suppose I got the job as part time , can anybody say the minimum wage per hour is supposed to be earned ?
DominicB - | 1,938    
21 Apr 2017  #7

@greejo123

Your chances of winning the lottery, getting struck by lightning, or being eaten by a shark are many times higher than your chances of finding work as a foreign student in Poland. Youth employment is very high, and there is no demand for unskilled labor that domestic supply cannot fulfill. Without speaking Polish very well, no one will hire you. And Polish takes many years to learn. Make your plans on the very safe assumption that you will never be able to earn a single penny in Poland. If you need to earn to learn, then Poland is not the country for you.
Nathans    
21 Apr 2017  #8

Polish language is not needed as long as you know PHP, Java, C++, or Python ; ) Since you're from India, you may be good at computer programming as more and more Indian programmers already work in Poland.
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
21 Apr 2017  #9

If Polish is not needed, how then will the foreign-born applicant successfully communicate with their Polish-born co-workers? I realize the universal language is in fact mathematical, not spoken language. Nonetheless, I'd imagine it could be a challenge if an Indian programmer is working at a Polish company, even a US firm, and everyone there is speaking their own variety of English.

Maybe, as in that old spy movie "Torn Curtain", two programmers, one from Poland, the other from Norway for instance, "talk" to one another by writing their formulae on the blackboard; the discussion is done by simply "answering" the other by a series of numerical notations in order to get across the main idea without having to use actual words:-)

Czy mowi pan po Java? - Ya govoryu pa Python!

Ich spreche PHP perfectly. - My knowledge is C++. etc..
rozumiemnic 9 | 3,211    
21 Apr 2017  #10

" how then will the foreign-born applicant successfully communicate with their Polish-born co-workers "

In English of course...:):)
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
21 Apr 2017  #11

Well, allright. Or a reasonable facsimile thereof:-)
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
21 Apr 2017  #12

Even in the US, the native tongue of the country is required in order to perform any higher-level, white-collar work!

Lifting crates as an illegal alien etc., I could understand that no English would be required, but not to require Polish in Poland for computer programming jobs??

It seems riduculous in the long run.
mafketis 16 | 4,533    
22 Apr 2017  #13

In English of course...:):)

Having to translate everything going on for the noob gets real old real fast...

a reasonable facsimile thereof

Having had the dubious pleasure of hearing lots of non-natives talking to non-natives it's hard for me to really call that English (or American) in any real sense since the discourse and politeness markers (as well as much of semantics and collocations) typical of native varieties are MIA

The idea solution would be for some distinct form of "international" English to break off from native varieties (and become distinct enough that native speakers would have to learn it or at least receive training in it).

I'll add that I've known young Polish people who are very proficient in the international reduced English but cannot pass a standardized test based on native usage to save their lives so this is a real issue affecting some young Polish people.
DominicB - | 1,938    
22 Apr 2017  #14

The idea solution would be for some distinct form of "international" English to break off from native varieties (and become distinct enough that native speakers would have to learn it or at least receive training in it).

That has already been done. Long ago, in fact. In the 1930s. It didn't go over so well because it was so divergent from normal English that it had to be learned as a second language even by native speakers, and saying even simple things could be quite complicated because of the limited word stock.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_English

Same thing for a whole slew of Pidgin Englishes out there:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_English

Most are completely incomprehensible to native speakers, and have to be learned for some time before you could communicate complex ideas.

Neither basic English or Pidgins are workable in a tech environment, though.
mafketis 16 | 4,533    
22 Apr 2017  #15

was so divergent from normal English that it had to be learned as a second language even by native speakers, and saying even simple things could be quite complicated because of the limited word stock

I'm not talking about BAsic English (which was never really workable) but a distinct standard that would allow common "international" structures like

- the party was funny (meaning: fun)
- women are discriminated in my country (meaning "discriminated against" or "suffer discrimination")
- I don't know where does she live (meaning "where she lives)
- I saw him to get into the car (meaning "saw him get into the car"

These and many other "wrong" expressions are extraordinarily common in all non-native contexts and those exposed to them long enough find it very difficult to get rid of them so you get the weird situation of people who are very communicative and by some measures fluent who can't pass standardized tests...
rozumiemnic 9 | 3,211    
22 Apr 2017  #16

the problem with 'standardised tests' is that they don't really work, as language fluency is not quantifiable.
I don't really see the problem with those 'errors' - people in a native and non native situation would understand them.
Do you mean there should be a test of incorrect English?
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
22 Apr 2017  #17

The bottom line, friends, is that there has been a double standard regarding English for too long!

In fact, the sui generis is called "Globish", to be more precise, "World English" and dates back at least seventy years or thereabouts to the man who first coined the phrase, indeed, who first advocated the use (later MISuse) of English as the world's lingua franca. That man was none other than Sir Winston Churchill:-)

What has irked me for the past decades is the apparent decline in expectations of English usage as compared with that other "great" world language, French.

Last time I checked, English was the language of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, Sir WIlliam S. Gilbert, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Emily Dickinson and a host of other luminaries, right up there with the Bard himself, Cervantes, Goethe, even Dante, in my opinion.....but from what's happened lately since digitalization, one would scarcely know it:-)

If a Pole speaking to a Lithuanian computer programmer is honest with both himself as well as his interlocutor about the fact the neither of them knows English that well, but is using it purely as a makeshift language, I have ZERO problem with that.

However, when international types get together and decide the speak English (often badly, I might add) and what's more, justify their poor English as simply the result of globalization, then I go bonkers, because it's nothing more than sheer rationalizing which then puts to shame anyone out there who is serious about true expression. The wrong becomes right and the right becomes weird.

So where are we then?
rozumiemnic 9 | 3,211    
22 Apr 2017  #18

Cervantes, Goethe, even Dante

Cervantes wrote in Spanish, Goethe wrote in German and surely Dante was Italian?
Not sure what your point is there...
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
22 Apr 2017  #19

The point is clearly that there remains a standard for each of those languages, and a high one:-)

So what about English? Cesspool language to the mega-filth who use our mother tongue to wipe their rears with?

Come on, man! Think you're playing the Devil's advocate here.
rozumiemnic 9 | 3,211    
22 Apr 2017  #20

yes all of those languages have an academy which 'maintains standards' and decides which new words will be allowed or not.
As you know of course, there is no such academy for English and that is one of its strengths as a world language. It is endlessly flexible and constantly changing. For example (as I am sure you know) the way that you can make a new verb out of a noun is quite an English thing.

English being the world language has only benefited us native speakers L., (whether for work teaching it, or allowing us to travel easily) so spluttering about 'cess pools' just sounds a bit silly.
mafketis 16 | 4,533    
22 Apr 2017  #21

the problem with 'standardised tests' is that they don't really work, as language fluency is not quantifiable.

I agree completely, but they are often tied to passing at universities...

I don't really see the problem with those 'errors' - people in a native and non native situation would understand them

why the scare quotes? they are errors in the sense that native speakers would not produce them, the fact that they're understandable doesn't change that

'nie znam to miasto' is also completely understandable in Polish and is an error
Ironside 43 | 8,069    
22 Apr 2017  #22

a double standard regarding English for too long!

Who are you kidding Lzyko? The overwhelming majority of so called native speakers do not adhere to any recognizable standards, different accent, regional and national differences, in vocabulary, pronunciation and oft grammar to some extent.

"Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, Sir WIlliam S. Gilbert, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Emily Dickinson" Your average native speakers wouldn't have a clue about most of their works, many wouldn't even recognize most of those names. Fix it before you have a go at 'international' speakers of English.

Some people mastered English better than others - that is all than can be said on the subject without divulge too many off topic details.

the sense that native speakers would not produce them

Is there any sense in talking about errors in such a case? Sometimes errors become a norm.
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
22 Apr 2017  #23

Rozumiemnic,

Apparently what you consider one of the "strengths" of English, I consider one of her major weaknesses, and growing weaker almost by the New York minute:-))

It's scarcely some clueless multinational teenager's fault, be they from India, Poland, Germany or wherever, if the international language they've come to believe to be their own (even though it isn't!!) has dropped standardization and whose guardians once upon a year were too uninspired to set up an Academy of English sometime along the way!

If multicultural communication has become the stuff of clever night club routines, japes, the butt of jokes and the like, then it is because English has been reduced to just that.

For the umpteenth time, I'd not be posting my complaints if the bulk of those non-native English speakers out there more often than not showed a wee bit of modesty in their application of our language, that is, admitting that they make errors and even appreciate positive, occasional correction. However, such people have become all too rare and more frequently than not, one has the feeling in certain situations that the tail's wagging the dog, that the educated native Anglophone is a dying species and when confronted with the witty patter of great English dialogue (of which it is infinitely capable), the foreigner today almost always blanches in embarrassment, claiming that great English is no longer important.

This, folks, is the tragedy!
TheOther 5 | 3,037    
22 Apr 2017  #24

if the bulk of those non-native English speakers out there more often than not showed a wee bit of modesty in their application of our language

You will have a point once the majority of native English speakers learn a foreign language. The real tragedy is that most Anglos are simply too lazy or arrogant to do that.
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
23 Apr 2017  #25

You tellin' me!
mafketis 16 | 4,533    
23 Apr 2017  #26

The real tragedy is that most Anglos are simply too lazy or arrogant to do that.

In my experience Americans aren't that bad at it when they have a real reason (like living in a country) while Brits seem to be philosophically against the very idea... under any circumstances (those are the general trends IME with some exceptions going both ways).
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
24 Apr 2017  #27

The Brits often bragged that they would travel the world without ever having had to utter a single word in a foreign language (stated usually in the enviable finest of Public School RP!).

And herein lies the essential difference between the Americans and the English, and why in this regard, I can accept the arrogance of the English, but not the benighted ignorance of the Americans. In the case of the Americans, the reasons for not learning a foreign language are based upon pure laziness and intellectual naivete, whereas in the case of the English, the exact opposite often holds true; they have such well-deserved pride in their mother tongue, they usually don't see why on earth they should even bother to learn another language, much less to hear it butchered by those who cannot speak her properly. I'm reminded here once again of the famous quip attributed to Voltaire when once asked whether he planned on learning some English in order to meet with a certain Lord Chesterton, to which he is said to have replied, "But my dear, what is English anyway but merely French spoken badly?"

After all, it is still British English which remains the world standard in serious negotiation, not American. For the latter, we Yanks have only ourselves to blame:-)
delphiandomine 80 | 15,699    
24 Apr 2017  #28

while Brits seem to be philosophically against the very idea... under any circumstances

I realised a few years ago about the benefits of knowing Polish. I was on holiday in Austria, and really had a horrible time in the supermarket as I didn't understand anything. I couldn't even buy stuff at the counters without using sign language and looking like a complete idiot.

Ended up going to the supermarket in Slovenia that was about 30km away, and...et voila. Sir? Meso? That'll do nicely!
Lyzko 15 | 3,298    
24 Apr 2017  #29

At least the attempt shows people that you're both interested and have a requisite respect for their language, be hanged if you don't know it fluently or have a poor accent!!!

The double standard persists that it's somehow acceptable for a Pole to sound like a Pole speaking English, but an Anglophone must try to sound like a Pole speaking Polish or the battle's lost before it even begun:-)

In some countries, natives can be most helpful to foreigners struggling to speak their language, such as in Czech Republic when I first tried to ask a question at the main train depot in Prague and the woman on the platform answered "Anno" which I stupidly took to mean some form of "No"LOL Rather than trying to switch to English, the woman merely nodded her head, indicating that in fact I was in the right place!

Only a little later did I find out from looking it up, that "Anno" in Czech of course means "Yes":-)))



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