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Minimal retired pay - how much in Poland?


wielki pan 2 | 250
28 Dec 2011 #2
How long is a piece of string? Polish pensioners get 900zl a month approx... For a person moving into Poland and after purchasing a house and car, I would suggest in the vicinity of 4000zl a month for a basic lifestyle.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,734
28 Dec 2011 #3
How long is a piece of string? Polish pensioners get 900zl a month approx

You can't really say that - because it's based on what you contribute during your working life. Hence why some ex-Communist generals and so on have huge pensions.
wielki pan 2 | 250
28 Dec 2011 #4
Communist amount to a small percentage of the population and even so what they get is not much, the vast majority of pensioners get around the 1000zl mark. (how they make ends meet is the million dollar question)
OP calcedonia 4 | 67
28 Dec 2011 #5
1000 minimum pay but avarage pay how much?
delphiandomine 83 | 17,734
28 Dec 2011 #6
Communist amount to a small percentage of the population and even so what they get is not much, the vast majority of pensioners get around the 1000zl mark. (how they make ends meet is the million dollar question)

A small percentage?

Last figures I saw suggested around 2 million people benefited from the Nomeklatura system. Quite a lot of those are now retired.

How they make ends meet? Never wondered who is doing much of the black market work in Poland, like my guarded car park? It's certainly not working people, but rather a lot of them who have taken early retirement.
OP calcedonia 4 | 67
28 Dec 2011 #7
Avarage retired pay how much in poland and how old retired age for men and women?
wielki pan 2 | 250
29 Dec 2011 #8
A small percentage?

Now Mr D I think its back to the classroom for you, considering the fact that general jaruzelski is getting only 4500zl a month on his retirement pension, I don't think a thug employed by the UB or other security force who belief was that his hands were made exclusively to beat people would get much more...the fact remains that previously the pension system provided for basic needs but now with goodies of live like TV, computers, mobile phones, the pension is just not enough...Polish people are still reluctant to invest in the future, like compulsory superannuation payments and until this occurs Poles retiring will find it tough.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,734
29 Dec 2011 #9
Now Mr D I think its back to the classroom for you, considering the fact that general jaruzelski is getting only 4500zl a month on his retirement pension, I don't think a thug employed by the UB or other security force who belief was that his hands were made exclusively to beat people would get much more.

Actually, if I recall rightly, Jaruzelski (and the others) had much of the pension restored to them as it was an unconstitutional move to cut their pensions - he's actually getting closer to 9000zl a month these days. There was a cut for ex SB-types, but they tended to acquire things during Communism anyway.

It's also worth pointing out that the Nomeklatura (especially the ones who only worked under Communism) would have feathered their nests in their own ways - many of them had/have other properties, for instance. Then - the generation that followed (the ones who weren't alive long enough to really benefit from the system) are often sitting in flats that cost them nothing or next to nothing, they often benefited from early retirement and tend to be still working illegally. While it might not be huge money, someone retired who works full time on the black market can easily be getting 2000zl a month in their hand - which, along with a flat that's paid for, isn't exactly bad money.

Also - worth pointing out that many of the poorest ones are actually sitting in flats worth quite a bit by modern standards. I know of one case in Poznan (my friends neighbour) where the woman is living in utter poverty, yet she lives in a 90sqm flat in the city centre that she owns. She could quite easily sell the place, move into somewhere smaller and use the money to live out her days peacefully - but she won't.

the fact remains that previously the pension system provided for basic needs but now with goodies of live like TV, computers, mobile phones, the pension is just not enough

It's not enough anywhere to buy goodies, really. Poland isn't unique.
wielki pan 2 | 250
30 Dec 2011 #10
Actually, if I recall rightly, Jaruzelski (and the others) had much of the pension restored to them as it was an unconstitutional move to cut their pensions - he's actually getting closer to 9000zl a month these days. There was a cut for ex SB-types, but they tended to acquire things during Communism anyway.

Come to think of it you may be right, I know that the good Generals pension was reduced from 8500 to 4500zl, now when you think about it that's not much for a person holding the greatest power in Poland, in real terms and compared to other leaders retiring in other countries it could only be described as peanuts, retiring military officers would get much, much less, like I mentioned before living on a pension is a hard call in Poland, working on the black market for a few zlotes must be humiliating to say the least.

Related: How much money one needs to retire in Poland for another 50 years?

I always wonder how much money would one need to comfortably(normally) retire in Poland for a maximum of 50 years,with a paid off place to live.I am talking of a normal living with a small car to commute esp in Warsaw vicinity.

About 3 mln PLN assuming you need on average 5K PLN per month for various expenses. But it all depends on what you are used to. Oh, and I do not factor in the effect of compound interest here.... in that case the amount would be somewhat lower but pls run your own calculations. :-)


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