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America takes leading investor spot in Poland


PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
24 Feb 2011  #1
America is the leading foreign investor in Poland accounting for 30 percent of foreign investment. Germany/UK are tied for second place and South Korea in third. Currently, the Polish market has more than 750 companies with direct participation of American capital. It is estimated that they invested so far nearly $ 20 billion. They employ over 180 thousand people.

Polish Information and Foreign Investment Agency estimates that the value of foreign capital inflow to Poland in 2011 will be from 10 to almost 11 billion euros. Slawomir Majman, president of the Agency stresses that this version of the optimistic predictions, because in the aftermath of the crisis conditions of acquisition of foreign capital is still very difficult.

Still does not have its normal supply. Makes itself felt very fierce competition between countries competing for investment and jobs. If you have not relied upon any unforeseen circumstances, the value of investments compared to last year probably will be higher by 10%. 30% of foreign investments in Poland belongs to the United States.

In second place is shared: the United Kingdom and Germany, and the third South Korea, which are interested in our country after several years of working całowicie passivity. Koreans now treat Poland as a gateway to develop contacts with the European Union.
Pinching Pete - | 559    
24 Feb 2011  #2
America is the leading foreign investor in Poland accounting for 30 percent of foreign investment.

<shrugs> Sure, we a natural pals... It should be this way. Poles should be smart though and not grow too fast. You don't want a Taco Bell on every corner, this kind of stupidity.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,378    
24 Feb 2011  #3
Interesting I expected that number 1 would have been Germany, by quite a fair bit. The Brits are a welcome surprise.
Bratwurst Boy 5 | 9,970    
24 Feb 2011  #4
It get's even better:

Poland: Is the new Germany of EU?

:)
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
24 Feb 2011  #5
Interesting I expected that number 1 would have been Germany, by quite a fair bit. The Brits are a welcome surprise.

Well official government facts don't lie, since last year America is the leading investor.

It get's even better:
Poland: Is the new Germany of EU?
:)

Far from it, maybe in economic growth, but actual numbers it's still got many years to go.
convex 20 | 3,980    
24 Feb 2011  #6
Odd numbers that seem to be contradicted on the official site: paiz.gov.pl/poland_in_figures/foreign_direct_investment

Based on the figures, US investors would have had to invest nearly €10b last year in order to have increased their holdings to $20b.

Will check the NBP and GUS site to see if the stats are out for 2010, I was under the impression that it wouldn't be until April that they would be released.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884    
24 Feb 2011  #7
this doesn't surprise me in the least. anybody else?

it seems like every year, the number of restaurants/fast food joints in Poland double, most of them american owned. i taught at Google, Hewlitt Packard.....ate at Planet Sushi/KFC/Pizza Hut......drank Coca Cola/Pepsi/Red Bull/......even occasionally stopped for green tea at Startucks.......American business and American products in Poland are absolutely everywhere.
grubas 12 | 1,392    
25 Feb 2011  #8
Red Bull

Red Bull is not American but Austrian even Red Bull sold in the US is imported from Switzerland.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884    
25 Feb 2011  #9
grubas wrote:

Red Bull is not American but Austrian even Red Bull sold in the US is imported from Switzerland.

OK, so everything I said minus Red Bull.
beckski 12 | 1,619    
25 Feb 2011  #10
You don't want a Taco Bell on every corner

Nor a Starbucks or McDonalds for that matter.
guesswho 4 | 1,293    
25 Feb 2011  #11
You don't want a Taco Bell on every corner, this kind of stupidity.

Nor a Starbucks or McDonalds for that matter.

none of them but a whole bunch of winos on every corner (at the kiosks), lol
grubas 12 | 1,392    
25 Feb 2011  #12
Like you don't have "winos" in every Indian or Pakistani owned 7-11 on every corner.You are right though,ordinary but Polish owned produce stand is better for Poland than foreign owned Starbucks or some other foreign owned s h t.
Raj_ryder 10 | 106    
25 Feb 2011  #13
/investment-news/poland-is-the-new-germany-of-eu/

Strange article. It compares three very different economies which aren't exactly comparable.
guesswho 4 | 1,293    
25 Feb 2011  #14
Like you don't have "winos" in every Indian or Pakistani owned 7-11 on every corner.

I'm very honest with you, not where I live but in general of course there are winos here too but I'm not complaining about the fast food restaurants :-) They employ many young people. Even though what they pay isn't great but in many cases, it's better than nothing.

Besides, it's not like you guys will have a choice, if they decide to have them, you'll have them anyway.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103    
25 Feb 2011  #15
I'm very honest with you, not where I live

One thing I’ve noticed is that usually just couple miles down the road one encounters a totally different world in the US, a contrast so pronounced that even a blind man can see, perhaps you should get out more and see all those American Kiosks. Very disappointed with what I’ve seen, not only that the grass is not greener on the other side of the pond but virtually none existent.

They employ many young people

Beg to differ, perhaps 10 years ago one might have seen a High School kids behind the counter, these days vast majority are well beyond that age group.

Even though what they pay isn't great but in many cases, it's better than nothing.

Exactly; just another indicator of the state of your job market but good enough to lower the unemployment statistics.
ShawnH 8 | 1,498    
25 Feb 2011  #16
most of them american owned. i taught at Google, Hewlitt Packard.....ate at Planet Sushi/KFC/Pizza Hut......drank Coca Cola/Pepsi/Red Bull/

Aren't most of the eateries you mentioned franchises? ie. a Polish investor has to ante up a good chunk of his own capital, in return for merchandising, product, advertising, and most importantly the brand name? Not sure what the ratio of "franchisee capital vs. corporate captial" would be....
guesswho 4 | 1,293    
25 Feb 2011  #17
One thing I’ve noticed is that usually just couple miles down the road one encounters a totally different world in the US, a contrast so pronounced that even a blind man can see, perhaps you should get out more and see all those American Kiosks. Very disappointed with what I’ve seen, not only that the grass is not greener on the other side of the pond but virtually none existent.

non existent in the Polish meaning of it (drunks hanging out at the door all day long). Maybe in Chicago or in one of the big cities but not where America is still more or less America. You just probably never got that far.

Beg to differ, perhaps 10 years ago one might have seen a High School kids behind the counter, these days vast majority are well beyond that age group.

again, in my town (actually just about anywhere in NC and SC) about 90% of people employed at the fast food restaurants are young.

Exactly; just another indicator of the state of your job market but good enough to lower the unemployment statistics.

let's talk about employment in Poland SHT, do you believe that your situation is better?
I know it, I was there.
Wroclaw Boy    
25 Feb 2011  #18
On a different note i was checking out some US investment properties the other day and once i zoomed in with street view it looked like a friggen WWIII zone. Real scum areas.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884    
25 Feb 2011  #19
ShawnH wrote:

Aren't most of the eateries you mentioned franchises?

so?
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007    
25 Feb 2011  #20
so

Aren't franchises everywhere in the world? And hardly a common dietry intake of the average Pole. Then again zimmy boy, what would you know about Poland now?
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
25 Feb 2011  #21
it seems like every year, the number of restaurants/fast food joints in Poland double, most of them american owned. i taught at Google, Hewlitt Packard.....ate at Planet Sushi/KFC/Pizza Hut......drank Coca Cola/Pepsi/Red Bull/......even occasionally stopped for green tea at Startucks.......American business and American products in Poland are absolutely everywhere.

This month Procter and Gamble decided on expanding it's Warsaw (Targowek) Pampers factory (3rd largest in the world) at a cost of 100 million zloty ($35 m) this adds to to the already existing Procter and Gamble's Gillette razor factory in Lodz (largest in the world) and Olay cosmetics factory in Aleksandrow Lodzki.

Another 100 million zł American company Procter and Gamble to invest Targowek - informs " Business Pulse " .
Procter and Gamble to expand the plant , where in addition to the diapers will produce wipes Pampers baby care . Thus, by the end of September this year uprising there 20 new jobs. Further investments of American companies are expected in Aleksandrów where in the local SEZ is counting 9 ha area where the plant is already Olay cosmetics brand with an area of ​​15 thousand . m . sq .

ShortHairThug - | 1,103    
25 Feb 2011  #22
Maybe in Chicago or in one of the big cities but not where America is still more or less America.

Been to New Orleans for Mardi Grass had to see what the hoopla was all about and then traveled through the deep south from cost to cost, American as America can be and what a sh!thole it was. To be brutally honest should have chosen Rio for the carnival. Sure there were some nice places too but that’s my overall impression. Not so long ago either, though I did like Sarasota very nice area overall, those sandy beaches but go on the Atlantic side to Pompano and you will find the familiar blocks of communist architecture and the feeling of overcrowded area something I really did not expect at all. Tampa? Some nice waterfront properties but driving to the Pier from the Treasure Island you go through the parts of town you would not like to find yourself at after sunset. Lt’s skip the middle and head straight to Southern California great natural beauty unfortunately just like everywhere else you will find poverty and eyesores there too. There was only one place on the way to California that I really liked, a livable town. Nothing like taking a road-trip to experience it all and expend your horizons, a real eye opener. Next time you’re on holiday, rent a car, you’ll get a better feel for what the region you’re visiting is all about, the atmosphere, the sounds and smells of the place; There’s nothing wrong with staying in your gated community and shutting yourself out from the rest of the world if that’s your thing but it’s like putting the blinders on and refusing to see anything that might offend your sight or smell, seeing it only in the strange places you visit as you had no choice but to go through them in order to reach your destination.

let's talk about employment in Poland SHT, do you believe that your situation is better?
I know it, I was there.

If it was do you honestly think that so many young people would have left? LOL. Let’s be honest though, for every bad you point out in Poland a similar can be found in U.S. or worse. America ain’t all that, been there, seen it, let me tell you not impressed. Once you have the financial means one place is as good as the other. You on the other hand either really live the sheltered life or have the tendency to isolate yourself from the reality by staying in your golden cage (your gated community or that all inclusive resort when on holiday), in reality you surround yourself with artificial bubble and you refuse to recognize that the myth of that all elusive American dream is just that - A DREAM for the vast majority of your countryman. To reinforce that dream you see all that’s bad and ugly in others. It’s hard to imagine that same holds true to where you live or perhaps you’re just jealous for you come to realize that even the worst of the worst that Poland has to offer don’t even come close to what you have seen in your own country. For those that are well off, comfort level is roughly the same wherever they happen to reside. If you have the financial means it don’t really matter where you choose to stay, if you don’t even U.S can be a third world sh!thole, I know - I’ve seen it.
ShawnH 8 | 1,498    
26 Feb 2011  #23
so?

Just sayin that on a thread about American Investments in PL, restaurants wouldn't be capital intensive for those American restaruants. The franchisee (local PL investors?) would be putting up the majority of the investment, compared to a diaper factory for example.
guesswho 4 | 1,293    
26 Feb 2011  #24
American as America can be and what a sh!thole it was.

matter of taste. This is how I felt visiting some places in Europe too.

There’s nothing wrong with staying in your gated community and shutting yourself out from the rest of the world

you have to admit that you're very anti-American. What you're describing is maybe typical for some big cities here but in the country I can't absolutely confirm your statement. Nothing smells around here and even in the poorer communities I don't see as much trash laying around as I saw it for example in Poland (Poland is just an example). There are quite a few European countries that I personally don't consider clean.

Let’s be honest though, for every bad you point out in Poland a similar can be found in U.S. or worse.

is that why you said

If it was do you honestly think that so many young people would have left?

lol

America ain’t all that, been there, seen it, let me tell you not impressed.

How much I was impressed of Europe shows the fact that I'm back home and really happy about it too. However I don't complain about my years in Europe, at least I have a chance to compare and to discuss about the differences with people like you knowing what I'm talking about. When you live in one country you get a totally different feeling about it than when you're just visiting it.

Once you have the financial means one place is as good as the other.

agree only to the certain extent as one place can be still way more comfortable to live in than the other. Matter of preference too.

You on the other hand either really live the sheltered life or have the tendency to isolate yourself from the reality by staying in your golden cage (your gated community or that all inclusive resort when on holiday), in reality you surround yourself with artificial bubble and you refuse to recognize that the myth of that all elusive American dream is just that - A DREAM for the vast majority of your countryman.

but the undeniable fact is that the vast majority of "my country men" still lives better than yours, even you said it

If it was do you honestly think that so many young people would have left?

If you have the financial means it don’t really matter where you choose to stay, if you don’t even U.S can be a third world sh!thole, I know - I’ve seen it.

I replied to that one above. I have an idea why you're so negative about everything American but there's no reason to talk about it since it won't change anything on both sides anyway.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 505    
26 Feb 2011  #25
One thing I’ve noticed is that usually just couple miles down the road one encounters a totally different world in the US, a contrast so pronounced that even a blind man can see, perhaps you should get out more and see all those American Kiosks.

You know what freedom means? It means freedom to fail.

Maybe in Chicago or in one of the big cities but not where America is still more or less America

Chicago is the most American of America's big cities.

On a different note i was checking out some US investment properties the other day and once i zoomed in with street view it looked like a friggen WWIII zone. Real scum areas.

Investment real estate in the US? Las Vegas has the best deals. It's where an English Bloke like you would be most happy.

I have an idea why you're so negative about everything American but there's no reason to talk about it since it won't change anything on both sides anyway.

You're too sensitive.
beckski 12 | 1,619    
26 Feb 2011  #26
Investment real estate in the US? Las Vegas has the best deals

LV has some fanastic real estate deals available, especially for retired folks. Unless you plan to byo job.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
26 Feb 2011  #27
Chicago is the most American of America's big cities.

Love that city New York also, can't say the same for Detroit a complete shithole. Can't call New York a truly American city since 1/3 of the residents were born outside the U.S and another third are 2nd generation in America.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 505    
26 Feb 2011  #28
LV has some fanastic real estate deals available, especially for retired folks. Unless you plan to byo job.

I think he was looking for investment property so he'd only be there part time at most, but yes, the recession hit hard but an enterprising bloke can still make it out there.

Love that city New York also,

But it's not America
guesswho 4 | 1,293    
26 Feb 2011  #29
Chicago is the most American of America's big cities.

never been there, tell me about it please. What makes it very American?

You're too sensitive.

what was so sensitive about my sentence you replied to? All I said was that it would be a nonsense to go any deeper into this subject as we (SHT and I) will definitely never agree to anything anyway.

But it's not America

Geographically it is but other than that I fully agree with you. This is how I feel about many big cities in the states anyway.
OP PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
26 Feb 2011  #30
Geographically it is but other than that I fully agree with you. This is how I feel about many big cities in the states anyway.

Because the big cities have jobs and it's where outsiders (foreigners) come to influencing the city with the culture they bring, music, food, style.


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