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Is there a traditional expression used as a welcome?


HalfpolishLass
30 Jan 2014 #1
Something my Babcia used to say...

When my Babcia and her sister would enter a home, the one entering would say something to the effect of, "Thank God, I'm home!" and the response would be something akin to, "Praise The Lord, you're home!" (At least, that's how they described it)

Is this a common Polish phrase, or is there a traditional expression used as a welcome? As non-speakers, the rest of my family does not know the Polish. I was hoping that it was common enough someone would know more about this tradition. They said this every time they walked into a home, without fail, for decades.
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
30 Jan 2014 #2
I'm not a native Polish speaker (not even close!), but I've mostly heard "Witamy!" = Welcome! Maybe something like "Serdecznie witamy do domu!", but this is strictly by the book and not at all regional or colloquial:-)

Am curious myself.
Wulkan - | 3,251
31 Jan 2014 #3
"Serdecznie witamy do domu!"

Will you ever stop with it?

"Thank God, I'm home!" and the response would be something akin to, "Praise The Lord, you're home!" (At least, that's how they described it)

My guess would be "Dzięki Bogu, jestem w domu" and the response "Bóg zapłać".
Marek11111 9 | 816
31 Jan 2014 #4
how about " gość w domu, Bug w domu "
lunacy - | 73
31 Jan 2014 #5
and the response "Bóg zapłać".

I heard something like "Szczęść Boże za szczęśliwy powrót" before.
kpc21 1 | 763
31 Jan 2014 #6
how about " gość w domu, Bug w domu "

Bóg, not Bug. "Bug w domu" would be rather unpleasent situation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bug_River
Space Cadet 1 | 19
1 Feb 2014 #7
Marek11111:how about " gość w domu, Bug w domu "

It's actually "gość w dom, Bóg w dom". It's one of the many greeting phrases.
TheStranger - | 34
1 Feb 2014 #8
There is no traditional expression in Poland (however, maybe in some regions in Poland - but I doubt that) which could be used as a welcome.

"Gość w domu, bóg w domu" simply describe how to treat a guest in your house - treat your guest like a god.

There is (or was?) however a traditional slavic custom to welcome a foreigner with bread and salt.
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
1 Feb 2014 #9
Or "Gość jest Pan Bóg w domu."
TheStranger - | 34
1 Feb 2014 #10
As I know it exists only in this form "Gość w domu, bóg w domu"
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
1 Feb 2014 #11
You're most probably correct, TheStranger! Dictionary vs. accepted standard colloquial usage can often be chasmic:-)
TheStranger - | 34
1 Feb 2014 #12
Well I said, that I knows it only in this form, which I mentioned - but maybe there are regional distinctions.
Paulina 9 | 1,448
1 Feb 2014 #13
Bóg, not Bug. "Bug w domu" would be rather unpleasent situation

lol :)

It's actually "gość w dom, Bóg w dom". It's one of the many greeting phrases.

It isn't a greeting phrase (at least nowadays). It's a proverb.

There is (or was?) however a traditional slavic custom to welcome a foreigner with bread and salt.

Not only foreigners :):

It's an old Polish custom, but nowadays it's usually reserved for special (and rather official) occasions, like a wedding or arrival of someone important.

Or "Gość jest Pan Bóg w domu."

No such thing. It's an old Polish proverb and it's only and always "Gość w dom - Bóg w dom.":

Each meeting consists of people, " the peace " and " political " in the Polish gentry strictly based on certain principles of politeness , especially when it took on an official character . Especially during the visits had to comply with the various formalities established , which were part of the unwritten code of social past.

It was the custom of old and widespread that in the common master, as well as in a peasant 's hut simple , always lay on the table bread and salt , which greeted guests at the thought of words contained in the title text. In many homes was also a habit of leaving a few free places at the table for men " Zagorskis " that may come up unexpectedly . Who came only in the thresholds home with a sword at his waist - a man of the knighthood , and gave honor to the host , had the right to sit with him to the table. For good tone should also expect visitors , especially when the visit was announced . Watch for them then in the morning , and many homes were sent up to the roof servant to this urgent follow if the guest arrives . When the servant gave to know that the vehicle is approaching from the guests to the house , everything that lived , was moving in greeting. A sign of respect was a photo of the cap, which is often accompanied by a beautiful bow. It was low , and the host put his left hand on the heart, the right and headed toward the ground . Welcome and farewell social was often the kiss , which was dependent on the situation , people and their age. The fashion was also kissing the hand , but used it only for older people . Mostly kissed the hand of elderly matron , serious ladies , very rare adult virgins .


niedziela.pl

When Poles greet guests they usually say "Witamy!" (or doubled: "Witamy, witamy!" :)) or simply greet them with "Hello", etc. If the guests aren't close family or people you know well Poles may also add "serdecznie" and it's going to be: "Witamy serdecznie", for example.

As I know it exists only in this form "Gość w domu, bóg w domu"

The correct version (or at least most commonly used) is the old Polish version: "Gość w dom - Bóg w dom". Without "-u" at the end.
lunacy - | 73
1 Feb 2014 #14
As Paulina explained, it's always "Gość w dom, Bóg w dom" (not domu*) and it's only an old-Polish proverb.
There are plenty of traditional forms of greeting/naming guests or the hosts (e.g. the form "mości gospodarzu" as a polite form to refer to the host). In some situations people were even expected to make religious or poetical references, sometimes people were using short rhymed sentences like "Uszanowanie, witam i o zdrowie pytam!" in a semi-humorous way. "Moje uszanowanie" was a courteous way of saying "I'm honored [to meet you]". Religious people were usually greeting each other with "Niech będzie pochwalony" or "Szczęść Boże".
Polson 5 | 1,771
1 Feb 2014 #15
"Gość w dom - Bóg w dom". Without "-u" at the end.

it's always "Gość w dom, Bóg w dom" (not domu*)

Was Old Polish easier by any chance? Dammit, I was born much too late it seems... ;)
lunacy - | 73
1 Feb 2014 #16
No. It actually became very simplified over time. It used to have for example even one more grammatical case (called ablatyw) that merged with dopełniacz (genitive).
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
1 Feb 2014 #17
I appreciate the correction, Paulina.

Here again, the pitfalls of "dictionary translation":-)
Polson 5 | 1,771
1 Feb 2014 #18
It actually became very simplified over time

'very simplified', I doubt that, but yeah, not as hard as it used to be, very probably. *phew*
It hasn't simplified enough to me, that's what I mean ;)


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