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in Polish slang, what is the difference between Siema and Siemka?


JustysiaS 13 | 2,240
5 Mar 2008 #31
Would you really like to be called like that? ;-) (you know what I mean: .izda)

im sorry your knowledge of pejoratives is so limited. the ending -izda has definitely nothing to do with the word p*zda, youre a bit paranoid. i dont get called Justysizda really, my mother sometimes says that to me, but it never came to my mind it was offensive. i dont care.
cinek 2 | 345
5 Mar 2008 #32
the ending -izda has definitely nothing to do with the word p*zda

Nothing but the sounding.

my mother sometimes says that to me

Of course, but please remember that what is allowed in talking between friends not always should be used in other situation.

I didn't want to say that you were any wrong with your examples. I just wanted to point out that the ending -izda may be not the best example for people learning Polish, and gave a much more common ending -cha as more useful.

Cinek
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240
5 Mar 2008 #33
i havent got a clue what your problem is, but whateverrrrrr.
AnotherGuest
10 Apr 2008 #34
@JustysiaS

Don't be upset but Cinek is 100%.
He just want give you (and for any other non-native Polish) a friendly tip i'm sure.

You should be aware we (native Polish) are very sensitive for endings.

Oprócz form zdrobnienia i zgrubienia we have also informal funny forms.
For example dupsko has dupisko or dupczysko.

Justysizda is the same kind informal funny form.
Similar funny forms could be
Justyczysko - associated to chlopczysko, zamczysko, etc
Justysiara, Justyczara- endings the same as for gitara, fujara, rozrabiara etc
Justyczora - potwora etc

Justysizda ending definitely for native polish is associated to p*zda.

I'm sorry but this is the our reality. If you would be a young girl at school, some non-friendly pupils could start rhymes similar to that:

Justysizda ( mała, gruba, blada, krzywa etc) p*zda.

If you just start calling that way your native Polish friends
Basia - Basizda, Gosia-Gosizda etc, you could lost her friendship very soon i'm afraid.
And your explanation you wasn't aware couldn't help you very much (at all) i'm afraid.

Ending -izda isn't offensive by itself for us. But belive me is able to generate easy associations to very well known swear p*izda as Cinek said, so it is pretty dangerous ending.

Best regards
NieMota - | 30
14 Apr 2008 #35
Hold your horses boy!I know who I am.Best regards

So what is your IP cheater ?
Let admin compare them ;-)
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
14 Apr 2008 #36
LMAO...Justysia IS a native Pole....:)
NieMota - | 30
14 Apr 2008 #37
Maybe, maybe but she is not a native polish speaker, so still she needs some help as you see.
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240
14 Apr 2008 #38
hahaha jestem z Polski niemoto (pasuje ci ta xywka) i moj angielski jest pewnie lepszy od twojego polskiego. ty potrzebujesz pomocy, nie ja. od tygodnia jestes na tym forum i juz uwazasz, ze wszystkich tu znasz i mozesz ich oceniac? bujaj sie na drzewo dziecko. i am a native Pole and a native Polish speaker dumbass, and who are you? just because my english is probably better than your polish doesnt mean im not Polish, if you know what i mean.
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
14 Apr 2008 #39
yes,her english is far too good for her to be an english native speaker :)
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240
14 Apr 2008 #40
lol, im guessing you are a model example of a native British person then, isthatu ;P
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
14 Apr 2008 #41
yas yuo gott thit write I am,me and hofiser crabtrey :)
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240
14 Apr 2008 #42
JustysiaS

Don't be upset but Cinek is 100%.
He just want give you (and for any other non-native Polish) a friendly tip i'm sure.

oh yeah, if you dont mind, please look at the 1st page of this discussion, i have already explained everything cinek has said there and justysizda was just one of the examples, i did use justysica there as well. i really dont see why you think i am not Polish, just because i havent assiociated justysizda with pizda? that is just what a paranoid person or a bully would do, not me or my family. my mind is probably not as perverse as yours. you are not even a member here, but you and that other debil come here and pick out one word from my whole post and dwell on it, just because you've got nothing better to do with your sorry lives.
learning 16 | 72
16 Apr 2008 #43
ok so aside from all this...

Justysia is an alternate diminutive of Justyna other than Justynka?

Just to clarify? And would calling someone this, be like talking to 5 year olds, or is it still endearing, lets say to a friend?
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240
18 Apr 2008 #44
Justysia is an alternate diminutive of Justyna other than Justynka?

yes. just to complicate your life even more lol, Justyneczka is a dimunitive form of Justynka, and Justysieczka would be a dimunitive from of Justysia. and yes, dimunitives like this are also endearing, not just patronising lol. i chose Justysia over Justynka because the latter in English sounds like "you stinker" lol
Kamil_pl
23 Apr 2008 #45
Siema is taken from 'Jak sie masz?' I think that not everybody knows that. But when somebody say to you 'siema' he isn't waiting for your answer :)
Guest
22 May 2008 #46
wot does myszko mean .texted busiaki myszko. ??

and tesknie buziaczki...moja brzoskwineczko?? anyone know pleeeeeese???
Saja - | 9
23 May 2008 #47
" myszko " means "my mouse", which is very lovely when saying to woman.

"and tesknie buziaczki...moja brzoskwineczko" is like " I miss you, kisses :x , my "peach lady" ..
DouViction
26 Dec 2009 #48
Well, I'm from Russian Federation (and we know some about swearing) and it's clear (to me, at least), that -izda IS sounding much like some other -zda (yes, it's PIZDA, IYNWIM).

So don't use it for a girl's names. Please. It hurdz.

*The word p*da in Polish seems to be similar to the same word in Russian-as tons of them, really. Still, the Russian misses the -izda ending totally, so, maybe I'm not 100%. But it seems to me that Justysizda sounds kinda ugly no matter if it's related to a women's vagina (which is the meaning of p*zda) or not.

And now tell me-if THREE people, tlaking different languages, tell you that -izda sounds ugly-why continie forcing it?

Sorry 4 offtop.
Moonlighting 31 | 234
2 Jan 2010 #49
Jan 2, 10, 00:59 - Thread attached on merging:
Siemka !

Hello,

What does it mean, when said at the end of a conversation, where people leave each other: "Siemka !". Couldn't find it in my dictionary.

Thanks in advance.
AnnaK - | 2
1 Mar 2010 #50
A Polish "mate" of mine sent me a text recently with only one word, "Siemka". I've texted back, asking what it means, but no reply yet. It has been bugging me all day. Would someone please tell me what that's all about!
Mr Grunwald 31 | 2,103
1 Mar 2010 #51
What does it mean, when said at the end of a conversation, where people leave each other: "Siemka !".

It is used as Goodbye but comes from the word Siema which again comes from "Jak sie Masz?" (which means "how are you?")

Would someone please tell me what that's all about!

You can just write back the same if you feel like it or in an other form of Goodbye in Polish
AnnaK - | 2
9 Mar 2010 #52
Thanks, but it's a bit bizarre, writing only one word in a text, meaning "goodbye", isn't it?? Normally if you wanted to write just one word to someone, it would be a greeting, like "hi", but then maybe this person is just a bit strange. I'm not going to lose sleep over it....!
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
31 Mar 2010 #53
Isn't siema an exmaple of bloker-speak like all that ziomal nonsense?
frd 7 | 1,399
31 Mar 2010 #54
Not that much anymore, it was at the beginning though.
tomek1234
13 Oct 2010 #55
"Siemka" to jest poprostu deminutyvum od "siema", to jest "sie majcze"/"[jak] sie masz", zaleźy od kontekstu.

Tomek
Seanus 15 | 19,706
13 Oct 2010 #56
Siemka is simply the diminuitive form of siema. It depends on the context.

That's what tomek1234 said. He's right. Hejka and heja is another.
Ania/PL
3 May 2012 #57
Hi! I'm Polish and its the same. 'Siema', 'Siemka', 'Siemano'...
siema
4 May 2012 #58
Siema was coined by Jerzy Owsiak, it is his fameus greeting.
In some conditions one can feel pretentious, or at least akward, when saying "siema".
Diminiutive "siemka" is more neutral.
iloveyou4everx - | 1
15 Dec 2012 #59
Merged: whats means siema, in slang??????/

whats means siema, in slang??????/


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