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Short Polish<->English translations


Polonius3 1,007 | 12,507    
26 Jan 2016  #361
Merged: "I want you" in Polish?

After i had translated the indicated sentences, a mod, recorded msg or other
e-robot said: the thread was moved or closed and your data cannot be posted. Sorry!
So the translation would go to waste I am re-threading it here:
Message:

So....I want you, he/she wants you, John/Ewelina wants you? anyone??

I want you. - Pragnę Ciebie.
On/ona Cię pragnie. -he/she wants you.
Janku, Ewelina Cię pragnie. - John/Ewelina wants you
plg 17 | 263    
27 Jan 2016  #362
" Ewelina wants you"

Context? Wants to fcuk you? Wants to speak to you?

As Polish is so difficult

No, you giving no context make things difficult.

No Wulkan me giving no context does not make it difficult.
Polish is what makes it difficult.
John says to Paul :" Damian wants you". Paul says :"ok".
Thats how it works in English. Of course he could say what for. Which the reply could be :" i dont know".
This is very normal.

So if i am trying or asking someone what is Polish for :" he wants you".
And he/she doesn't understand then i am afraid that is the Polish language's fault.
None mine. There is no need to say why in English. It's perfectly acceptable.

Merged: "I want you" in Polish?

After i had translated the indicated sentences, a mod, recorded msg or other
e-robot said: the thread was moved or closed and your data cannot be posted. Sorry!
So the translation would go to waste I am re-threading it here:
Wulkan - | 3,280    
27 Jan 2016  #363
And he/she doesn't understand then i am afraid that is the Polish language's fault.

More like your Polish friend's fault if she doesn't understand.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,202    
28 Jan 2016  #364
Thats how it works in English.

You cannot translate directly from one language to another. What works in English isn't going to necessarily work in Polish.
In your above example what you need to say is " Damian wants to speak to you", because if a person is wanted by another, there will always be a reason why. That reason puts context into the sentence, and in Polish language, context is everything.

And he/she doesn't understand then i am afraid that is the Polish language's fault.

Sorry but it isn't. You are making the mistake of thinking you can directly translate from English to Polish. You are blaming the language instead of your own lack of understanding.

There is no need to say why in English.

But there is in Polish and this is what you need to understand.
gumishu 11 | 4,850    
28 Jan 2016  #365
'ale laseczki'

laska and the diminutive laseczka is a quite fresh borrowing from the Czech language - 'laska' in Czech means 'love' also a person one loves or has a crush on

at first 'laska' or 'moja laska' meant a girlfriend then it developed a meaning of girl in general and then 'hot girl'
Chemikiem 5 | 1,202    
28 Jan 2016  #366
Thanks for that information Gumishu, interesting to hear that laska and it's diminutive is borrowed from Czech language!
Polonius3 1,007 | 12,507    
29 Jan 2016  #367
this is how laska entered

Did you mean the word laska or its "hot chick" meaning? Laska has meant a walking-stick in Polish since time immemorial. And łaska is the Polish word for grace and shared the same root as the Czech laska (the Bohemians had lost the distinction between the soft and hard L). The now anecdotal "laska nebeska" was perceived by Poles as meaning both a blue walking-stick and blue phallus. Maybe the meaning of laska (hot chick) entered that way but not the word itself.

One example of Czech influence goes way back: obywatel. In Polish it should've been obywaciel.
gumishu 11 | 4,850    
29 Jan 2016  #368
Did you mean the word laska or its "hot chick" meaning

the other one - sure the word laska existed in Polish for centuries before but the meaning of girlfriend then a girl in general then hot girl was borrowed from the Czech language in like late 70's or even 80's
Ziemowit 12 | 3,109    
29 Jan 2016  #369
The now anecdotal "laska nebeska" was perceived by Poles as meaning both a blue walking-stick

Indeed, Helene Vondrackova sang it together with Maryla Rodowicz at the Sopot Festival once and they held a blue walking-stick while singing it.

and blue phallus

Never heard of this meaning before.

Maybe the meaning of laska (hot chick) entered that way.

It's one of the current theories.

Laska means "miłość" in Czech.
Milost means "łaska" in Polish.

Wasza miłość --> Waszmość in old Polish was a way of addressing high-rank people meaning "Wasza łaskawość" (in other words: "Łaskawy Panie/Łaskawa Pani")
NorwegianInLove    
30 Jan 2016  #370
Merged: Help to express my love - translation

Hi,

I have met this gorgeous polish girl, and fallen in love with her. We speak norwegian to each other (she lives in Norway), but I want to express my feelings to her in her native language. Hopefully, some of you can help me.

The phrase I want to say to her is:
"I can not explain how or why I feel like I do. I just know that you make me smile, and I have butterflies flying around in my stomach every time I think of you. You can call it love at first sight, or just two soulmates finally meeting. I don't care. I love you."
Polonius3 1,007 | 12,507    
8 Feb 2016  #371
I don't care. I love you.

Nie potrafię wyjaśnić, co czuję i dlaczego. Wiem tylko, że przyprawiasz mnie o uśmiech, a w brzuchu czuję motyle kiedykolwiek o Tobie pomyślę. Można to nazwać miłością od pierwszego wejrzenia, a może wreszcie spotkały się dwie bratnie dusze. Zwał jak zwał, mnie wszystko jedno. Po prostu kocham Cię!
Ivydivy    
13 Feb 2016  #372
Hello

I'm wondering if any Polish speakers could help me translate a phrase my grandparents always said when we sat down to eat. They never spelled it out for me, so I only know it phoenetically as "boo-shants pani." I think they said it meant something like "bon appetite" but I'm not sure. Any help?
Nathans    
13 Feb 2016  #373
In Polish 'smacznego' means 'bon-appatite' - but your phonetics isn't too close to that.. : )
Olekowski    
13 Feb 2016  #374
sounds more like "usiądź pani" which means "sit down lady"
Roger5 2 | 1,476    
13 Feb 2016  #375
my grandparents

Where exactly were they from, and how old were they when they left Poland?
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,717    
13 Feb 2016  #376
maybe it was some kind of private joke between them?
Sun deep 1 | 6    
4 Mar 2016  #377
Merged: want to know polish language

Hello poles! how to say good morning?
Wulkan - | 3,280    
4 Mar 2016  #378
Hello poles! how to say good morning?

Google translate is bad but not this bad.
Looker - | 987    
4 Mar 2016  #379
In Polish the 'good morning' or 'good afternoon' is the same - "dzień dobry" - we say dzień dobry until the sun is shining - before sunset. Then just we change it for 'dobry wieczór'. Those are only terms for greeting. For a goodbye during a day we say mostly something like "do widzenia" or "na razie", etc. However the 'dobranoc' is used exclusively when we say goodbye to someone (not for a greeting) and it's late already - night or almost night.
Yantina - | 17    
21 Mar 2016  #380
Hello people!
I need help again.
Tried different online translators,but results are confusing.

Nie odzywam się żeby nie zakocha się...
Polonius3 1,007 | 12,507    
21 Mar 2016  #381
Nie odzywam się żeby nie zakocha się

Only the infinitive ending -ć is missing. Also the word order could be improved. It should read:

Nie odzywam się, żeby się nie zakochać.
Wulkan - | 3,280    
21 Mar 2016  #382
Nie odzywam się żeby nie zakocha się

That's incorrect for sure but what do you want to say in English?
Polonius3 1,007 | 12,507    
21 Mar 2016  #383
boo-shants

Sounds like someone try to say good luck in French: Bonne chance!
Yantina - | 17    
21 Mar 2016  #384
I am not the one who wrote it.
I received this message from a Polish friend.

It is still very confusing,even when I try to translate the version Polonius wrote.

Google Translate will even give different results when I select other languages.
For example: PL > EN: They did not speak,not to fall in love
PL > NL Ze sprak niet ....etc (translated: She did not speak)
I tried other languages,all with different results (She didn't want to speak... He did not say...I'm saying... etc)

Translactica gives me this: PL > EN : I am not saying a word in order not to fall in love.

Could it mean that he does not want to talk because he does not want to fall in love with me?
Or maybe he does not want to encourage me to fall in love with him?

Whatever it means...I think I have to agree that it's better not to fall in love. This language barrier is just too big :(
jon357 65 | 13,654    
21 Mar 2016  #385
He's saying he wouldn't have been talking to you in the first place if he didn't want to fall in love.

He likes you ;-)

There's a problem with the zachocha się as others have said. If it's meant to be zachokasz się and he just missed the end off (or autocorrect) then the meaning is slightly different but still OK.

That sounds a bit more like "I wouldn't have got in touch in order for you to not fall in love with me.
Yantina - | 17    
21 Mar 2016  #386
Oke,thank you for helping. :)

Polish is a difficult language and not being able to talk face-to-face doesn't make it any easier.
KentP    
22 Mar 2016  #387
Merged: Translation of slang

Hi
Can someone please help me translate the following:

Hej , jak to leciało z ta nutella ? Is Nutella a slang Word in Poland?

Thanks in advance :-)
singingfalls 3 | 48    
23 Mar 2016  #388
Merged: what is the meaning of "ciacho"

OK, forgive my ignorance. What is the contemporary meaning of "ciacho" in Poland.
Wulkan - | 3,280    
23 Mar 2016  #389
attractive person
bubblesfii    
24 Mar 2016  #390
Merged: What does this polish word mean

trafił

Thank's :)



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