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"Poles" or "Polish people" - which is better to use?


mysticism117
16 Nov 2015 #121
It seems English ain't your name neither. : )) please learn how to pronounce by the way. I've never wanted to say that though yeah it seems most people (at least those one in this forum) in Poland are below Brits, China, India, Canada's etc. etc. etc. IQ/Knowledge

/pəʊl/ instead of /pɔːl/
oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/paul-les?q=Paul

And this is my last post.
dolnoslask
16 Nov 2015 #122
At a £100 a paragraph I don't think that PF can afford you.

I don't mind being called a Pole or Polish , I don't see the difference, but i don't have a masters degree in English so technically I may be wrong.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
16 Nov 2015 #123
Pole or Polish

Since the start of the significant influx of Poles to the British Isles from 2004, one may often encoutner the term "the Polish" by analogy to "the French" or "the Irish". I wonder if that is correct. One does not say "the German" (adjective) but "the Germans" (plural noun). The adjectival version seems to be used mainly with nationalities where the singular ends in -man: Frenchman and the French, Irishman and the Irish. Since there is no Polishman, neither should oen say "the Polish". Whaddya think?
dolnoslask
16 Nov 2015 #124
Polanious, you blow me out of the water when it comes to the English or Polish language, I have forgotten what verbs adverbs let alone a adjective.

but I guess, and going on gut feel, the use "the Polish" would be a negative to me , Polishman also seems strange to me, or have I missed your point?
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
16 Nov 2015 #125
Polishman

No, I said Polishman does NOT EXIST. I was trying to point out that nationalities such as Dutchman, Frenchman, Englishman, etc. have the Dutch, the French and the English. But the Polish, the Czech, the German, etc. are not used.
Sczur - | 28
17 Nov 2015 #126
By accepting the derogatory name of Pollock we are reserving our right to ridicule others which I value highly as I consider we polish as higher value human beings
Ktos 17 | 456
17 Nov 2015 #127
The term "Pole" is derogatory to me and many other Polish people I know but it is not meant to offend or belittle anyone because westerners use a lot of colloquial terms in every day life as well as in some formal media outlets. In Britain, for instance, even in the media the British tend to, sometimes, refer to themselves as "Brits". So in British culture to say "Pole" is not meant to offend a Polish person. In general, westerners use abbreviations and informal terms much more often than Polish people and they use them in formal settings to a some extent as well, whereas Polish people almost never do that in similar circumstances.

I personally prefer to hear "Polish people" rather than "Poles" though - it sounds more respectful and proper to me.
jon357 63 | 15,722
17 Nov 2015 #128
The term "Pole" is derogatory to me

I've never heard anyone say that, and frankly it says more about you than the word. Does a Finn, a Turk, a Kurd, a Jew, a Breton or a Basque say the English language word for them is offensive?
dolnoslask
17 Nov 2015 #129
Ktos I think you hit the nail one the head when it comes to Brits/Pole, In Britain I was never offended by the term Pole, I guess its possible that the use of Pole in some other countries may be meant to be offensive bit like polak in the USA, must admit i got ****** off with the polak jokes when i was in america, I understand how the irish feel about the irish jokes in the uk, small minded people everywhere i'm afraid.
Ktos 17 | 456
17 Nov 2015 #130
I've never heard anyone say that, and frankly it says more about you than the word. Does a Finn, a Turk, a Kurd, a Jew, a Breton or a Basque say the English language word for them is offensive?

I am not interested in how other nationalities feel about their nationality being verbally abbreviated in this way, I am referring to how Polish people and I, as a Polish person myself, may find such word offensive even if it was not intended to offend.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,869
17 Nov 2015 #131
Actually Ktos, I am British and do find the term 'Brit' a bit grating, esp when used by Irish people, although the majority of people do use it without meaning to be offensive.
jon357 63 | 15,722
17 Nov 2015 #132
how other nationalities feel about their nationality being verbally abbreviated in this w

'Verbally abbreviated'? Don't talk rubbish, it's a very old word, centuries' old and it is a matter for English speakers. If anyone's offended by it, then they are just being laughably feeble.

although the majority of people do use it without meaning to be offensive.

'Brit' seems to be a recent thing, via the media. Unlike 'Pole', a long established word.
Harry
17 Nov 2015 #133
I've never heard anyone say that

I've spend decades living with Polish people and the same living with British people and I have never heard anybody say that the word 'Pole' is remotely derogatory or that it is supposed to be derogatory or that it is used in derogatory ways.

The term "Pole" is derogatory to me and many other Polish people I know

Clearly you don't know many Poles. I refer you to
the Federation of Poles in Great Britain (ht tp://zpwb.org.uk/index.php/default) and
the British Poles Initiative (ht tp://britishpoles.uk/).

Even Poles who get very butthurt about British people have no problem with the word: theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/aug/17/polish-downing-tools-get-recognition-deserve-state-handouts

I am referring to how Polish people and I, as a Polish person myself, may find such word offensive even if it was not intended to offend.

Perhaps the way you get upset by a word which Polish people are very clearly more than willing to use to describe themselves says something about how Polish you are?
jon357 63 | 15,722
17 Nov 2015 #134
Federation of Poles in Great Britain ... and the British Poles Initiative .

Very true and neither Ryszard Kapuściński nor Joseph Conrad had any issue with the word.
Sczur - | 28
18 Nov 2015 #135
Sensitivity is a sign of weakness Polish people are supposed to be strong set a good example wherever we emigrate in any Irish pub in United States there are alcoholic Irish jokes written on every wall
AdamPole - | 1
17 Dec 2015 #136
Well, part of my family is Polish, although I really don't know much Polish as a language, but I do know that Pole means Field in Polish. So when they say POLES, I am thinking two things, a pole in the ground made of wood, or a field. The reference to Polish people as a Pole or Poles, is a bit insulting. It is like a Mexican from Mexico calling you a Gringo, it is disrespectful especially when it refers to be a foreigner and yet you are not even a foreigner in your own country when in fact, he is the foreigner. Even on Wiki, they use the word POLES but don't indicate that it is disrespectful. As I read here, I am not the only one who doesn't like references as a POLE. I find it just as bad as using the words Spic, Greaser, Wetback, etc.
Atch 17 | 3,349
17 Dec 2015 #137
Well this guy calls himself a Pole (as indeed you do yourself Mr Troll who calls himself AdamPole even though the term Pole is 'disrespectful'):

mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/im-pole-pole-meet-britains-5283112
Chemikiem 7 | 2,406
17 Dec 2015 #138
As I read here, I am not the only one who doesn't like references as a POLE.

Then perhaps you shouldn't have included reference to it in your username then.

I find it just as bad as using the words Spic, Greaser, Wetback, etc.

Those are all derogatory terms. Google 'Pole'. Nowhere does it say that this word is derogatory or offensive.
Bartkowiak 5 | 114
17 Dec 2015 #139
I, as a Pole, have no problem with the word.
savage_1
28 Jan 2017 #140
Well, I am Polish, hate it when people call me a Pole, even if it isn't meant in a bad way, but I see it as a slur, so I prefer to be called a Polish person, thanks :)
mafketis 24 | 9,145
28 Jan 2017 #141
Those are all derogatory terms. Google 'Pole'. Nowhere does it say that this word is derogatory or offensive

IINM it's kind of derogatory in Australia.
TheOther 5 | 3,758
1 Feb 2017 #142
kind of derogatory in Australia

Nah, it's not. You probably thought of an Icy Pole ... which has nothing to do with a Polish person... :)
Marsupial - | 886
1 Feb 2017 #143
That's normal here not offensive. One guy asked me why that is the name one day told him to drop pants and bend over i would demonstrate. He passed.
NoToForeigners 10 | 1,049
1 Feb 2017 #144
told him to drop pants and bend over i would demonstrate.

Now we know what you do in your free time. Lol
Marsupial - | 886
1 Feb 2017 #145
Yeah lol. That shut him up though trust me on that one.
pukpuk
7 Feb 2017 #147
It is rather simple, Polish is an adjective and a Pole is a noun.
So yes, you can use Poles and Polish People interchangeably.

I use both Poles and Polish People; there is no difference.
Clueless
1 May 2017 #148
... I have no idea and just felt like joining the conversation ;) I never knew saying Pole or Pollack was offensive, yet I don't speak of or hear of people from Poland all that much, hehe.
Lyzko 28 | 7,020
1 May 2017 #149
"Poles" is just fine, "polak", definitely not!
nothanks - | 640
1 May 2017 #150
Polak is reserved for within the Polish community


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