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Nice Polish words to say to a girl


shush 1 | 212
8 Jun 2010  #61
PLEASE COULD YOU TELL ME IN POLISH.

Dziekuje Ci za bycie moja zona i za to, ze dalas mi wspaniala corke. Uczynilas ze mnie szczesliwego mezczyzne i nie moge juz sie doczekac kiedy znow Cie ujrze.

The resident Poles will have a laugh, then correct it.

I wont laugh, today it's the day of goodness for animals :P

WHEN I MET YOU KASIA MY DREAMS COME TRUE

Kiedy Cię spotkałem, Kasiu, moje marzenia się spełniły.
Seanus 15 | 19,716
8 Jun 2010  #62
You chose the passive construction, the one that was asked for :)

Wouldn't you have to mention that it was the first time? I'd use poznać.

How very Christian of you :) :) :)
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,543
8 Jun 2010  #63
Jesteś czarująca!
Don't mix it with Czarownica/czarownicą
It may lead to the opposite of what you intended to get
southern 76 | 7,103
8 Jun 2010  #64
Nested moja Doda Elektroda.
pgtx 29 | 3,160
8 Jun 2010  #65
tell her:
Nie znam slow tak pieknych, ktorymi moglbym Cie opisac. Nie znam zjawisk tak cudnych, do ktorych moglbym Cie porownac. Slowo piekno nazbyt jest ubogie, aby w pelni oddac twa urode. Slowo cudowna znaczy zbyt malo, by okreslic dobroc Twa cala....

and then hand her a bucket...
:)
Ataraxie - | 13
1 Jul 2010  #66
What means "Misiaczku", "Misiulku" and "Miśka"?
bombelku56 1 | 20
2 Jul 2010  #67
These appear to be diminutive forms of "miś" - bear - meaning something like a "teddy bear." See also "misiu pysiu" and "niedzwiadku." I love it when my girlfriend uses these terms of endearment with me!

One of the English words I like to use when describing how I feel about my girlfriend is "cherish." Oxford defines this word as:

"protect and care for (someone) lovingly"

I have yet to find a translation to Polish that is a good fit for this word. Most resources simply point me to "miłować ," and another tenuous fit was perhaps "opiekować się," or even "chronić," but these don't seem correct.

Miłować becomes redundant, for example, when I try to say "I will love and cherish you..."

Can anyone help me with this, please?

Jesteś czarująca!
Don't mix it with Czarownica/czarownicą

Point well taken, though I use both terms with my girlfriend, as she is charming, enchanting, and clearly cast a spell on me at some point! There is likely no way I would get away with this, except that she introduced me to the word, saying in her adorable way: "Maybe I'm little czarownica!" ... this became a learning experience for both of us, as well as an unexpected "pet name!" I wonder what a diminutive form of czarownica might look like? ;-)
Seanus 15 | 19,716
2 Jul 2010  #68
'Kocham Cię' or 'Jesteś uroczna' are good but I find that normal talking works. Just cut out the cheese (not cut the cheese) and keep it real.
Miguel Colombia - | 351
2 Jul 2010  #69
So how do I tell a Polish girl "I like your eyes".
bombelku56 1 | 20
2 Jul 2010  #70
'Kocham Cię' or 'Jesteś urocza' are good but I find that normal talking works. Just cut out the cheese (not cut the cheese) and keep it real.

I suppose I was not very clear. I did not so much mean 'say' these words, as write them. For me, the word 'cherish' and the sentiment behind it is quite real no matter how I communicate it to her. I expect it will be part of our vows, so I still want to know:

how to best translate the English word "cherish" into Polish?
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
2 Jul 2010  #71
Cherish

The verb? Probably miłować. But don't ask me how it's conjugated.
Seanus 15 | 19,716
2 Jul 2010  #72
Possibly. Umiłować maybe? Or that could just be my creation :)
alexw68
2 Jul 2010  #73
uwielbiać, no?
Seanus 15 | 19,716
2 Jul 2010  #74
That's more like 'adore' I'd say, not cherish :)
alexw68
2 Jul 2010  #75
So says the słownik, agreed. Not sure I know what the difference is in English though....
Seanus 15 | 19,716
2 Jul 2010  #76
You cherish memories, friendship etc. You adore people, animals etc. Cherish is where you hold it dear and adore is where you really like sth.
alexw68
2 Jul 2010  #77
True but the context is what you say to a person. To say 'cherish' direct here is perhaps a little Austenesque...
Ataraxie - | 13
2 Jul 2010  #78
And, "pysiaczku". What means?
Seanus 15 | 19,716
2 Jul 2010  #79
To say 'cherish' direct here is perhaps a little Austenesque

Not when citing marriage vows it isn't, Alex :P
alexw68
2 Jul 2010  #80
Granted. I'm not sure, though, that the form of words used in front of a (putatively) chaste priest is entirely representative of the phraseology one would use to either initiate or sustain a relationship. Again, the hideous spectre of 19th century costume drama and its hyperventilated twaddle looms in the background :)
Seanus 15 | 19,716
3 Jul 2010  #81
Hmm...an interesting choice of words :) Słoneczku is nice. My little sun :)
bombelku56 1 | 20
6 Jul 2010  #82
I am too stubborn to give up on "cherish" just yet, so here is a review of one dictionary entry:

verb
[with object]

protect and care for (someone) lovingly

hold (something) dear:I cherish the letters she wrote

keep in one's mind (a hope or ambition):he had long cherished a secret fantasy about his future


I think it's obvious I am interested in the first definition. So far, there does not seem to be one word that is a good fit. Perhaps I need a short phrase to do the job?

Unrelated searches happened to turn these up tonight:

opiekować się kimś (to take care of somebody)
troszczyć się o kogoś (synonym for opiekować/martwić się)
zajmować się kimś (synonym for opiekować się)
martwić się (to care about somebody)

Perhaps someone here more well-versed in Polish will see something useful here?
Jo
7 Jul 2010  #83
And, "pysiaczku". What means?

I just only want to say what means "Pysiaczek". You know that little kitten and puppie has sweet mouth, so "Pysio" is sweet animal mouth, and "Pysiaczek" is a person who has sweet mouth like has puppie or kitten. You can also say in polish: buziaczku, mordeczko, or "daj pysia" ( what mean - let me give you a smooth kiss on the mouth)
bombelku56 1 | 20
14 Jul 2010  #85
A diminutive, familiar form of kitten, apparently (kocia k, -ka, -ki, -kiem)
"kociak" may also mean "chick" as a slang term for a pretty girl...
Wawel - | 14
14 Jul 2010  #86
"Moja mała ptaseczka"
Crow 143 | 7,520
14 Jul 2010  #88
disguising and very dangerous thread.

Girls don`t need these BS to be satisfied. Girls like bad boys
bombelku56 1 | 20
16 Jul 2010  #89
Perhaps some of the younger ones, but not the more mature women, in my experience. My girlfriend appreciates the sweet things, and I doubt she'd marry me if I was a bad boy!
Pinching Pete - | 559
16 Jul 2010  #90
Girls like bad boys

Basically true.. and the good guy get's to be married to them, be the pantoflarz and pay for everything.

Ergo.. Marriage is the sucker's walk.


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