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Mushroom: pieczarka vs grzyb


BuffaloM 1 | 2
5 Dec 2012  #1
I learned that pieczarka was mushroom, but when it comes to food my family eats zupa grzybowa -- we don't say zupa pieczarkowa. Some internet searches turned up gryzb as being mushroom others as fungus. Is one word used more in some situations than other? Did I learn the wrong word in my studies or have we been using the wrong word at home (and eating fungus soup?). Any insight would be helpful.
ShawnH 8 | 1,498
5 Dec 2012  #2
If I am not mistaken, grzyb refers to mushrooms in a general sense and pieczarka is a very specific type of mushroom.
Astoria - | 155
5 Dec 2012  #3
Zupa pieczarkowa is usually made from cultivated agaricus mushrooms. Zupa grzybowa is usually made from wild mushrooms. Every pieczarkowa is grzybowa, but not every grzybowa is pieczarkowa.
OP BuffaloM 1 | 2
5 Dec 2012  #4
Two very good answers. Thanks so much.
Zibi - | 336
5 Dec 2012  #5
Pieczarki = champignons
Marysienka 1 | 195
5 Dec 2012  #6
Fungi are grzyby in Polish.
Also mushroom are grzyby in Polish. We assume talking about eating/cooking etc. we mean edible muschrooms.
Pieczarka is a type of mushroom, usually this one
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agaricus_bisporus
kondzior 8 | 946
5 Dec 2012  #7
Only mashroom that is eaten by English people is cultivated pieczarka. They don't know real mashrooms, poor fellows.
polonius 54 | 420
5 Dec 2012  #8
But continental Europeans do and call the borowik a Steinpilz, porcini or cèpe.
Also enjoyed are chantrelles, morels, honey mushrooms and many others.
My late Polish granddad in Michigan used to pick mushrooms called babie ucho and kozie brody. Anyone know if those are still known in Poland and what their English translation is?
AlicjaK - | 14
5 Dec 2012  #9
Marysieńka- why usually? Pieczarka is always what it is, and it is in the picture :)
Marysienka 1 | 195
5 Dec 2012  #10
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szmaciak_gałęzisty
grzyby-polskie.eu.interia.pl/16.htm
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piestrzenica

Haven't heard about those before, and English wikipedia has just Latin names for it.

Marysieńka- why usually? Pieczarka is always what it is, and it is in the picture :)

Wikipedia says, that there are more kinds of mushrooms at pieczarka family. That one is the one I always think of when I say pieczarka, but then I wanted to be precise.
pam
6 Dec 2012  #11
Only mashroom that is eaten by English people is cultivated pieczarka. They don't know real mashrooms, poor fellows.

Oh really?
Must remember that next time i put Porcini and Ceps in my risotto....
Just because Pieczarka mushrooms are commonly found in supermarkets/veg shops, doesn't mean they're the only type of mushrooms we eat.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
6 Dec 2012  #12
They don't know real mashrooms, poor fellows

oh we do, we do, don't worry - they are fabulous in Wales in October...;)
zetigrek
6 Dec 2012  #13
Must remember that next time i put Porcini and Ceps in my risotto....

Do you collect it on your own?

Btw. wikipedia says that Porcini and Ceps are the same Boletus edulis. Did you mean chanterelle, maybe?

Besides chanterelles, Porcini and, ahem, shrooms do you have other mashrooms in British cuisine?

My late Polish granddad in Michigan used to pick mushrooms called babie ucho and kozie brody. Anyone know if those are still known in Poland and what their English translation is?

Is he late because of those mashrooms? They are poisonous!
As for the names, it's really easy to check in the era of the internet, all need is the latin name. The latin name is Gyromitra esculenta, sometimes refered as "fake morels".
berni23 7 | 379
6 Dec 2012  #14
Kozie brody poisonous?
Engendered maybe, but not poisonous.
zetigrek
6 Dec 2012  #15
I meant babie uszy.
Just checked what are kozie brody and I saw it once in a forest but didn't know it was eatable.

Babie uszy are eatable if cooked. Rather not eaten in Poland though.
polonius 54 | 420
6 Dec 2012  #16
Nope, dzaidek lived to be 90. Never saw how they were prepared, but were nice in soups and sauces. Prrbably mixed them with flavourful opieńki (honey mushrooms), which were the most abundant in Michigan.

Some mushrooms are poisonouis unless properly prepared, like cooking and then pouring off the first water. I think piestrzenice belong to that category, but I'm no mushroom specialist.
pam
7 Dec 2012  #17
Besides chanterelles, Porcini and, ahem, shrooms do you have other mashrooms in British cuisine?

In British cuisine the most commonly used mushrooms are Pieczarka. We also have button mushrooms which i think are baby versions of the same variety, and Chestnut mushrooms which are brown and stronger tasting. We also have field mushrooms, which i think are very large open Pieczarka mushrooms.

I usually stuff them with a filling and bake them in the oven.
In most large supermarkets here you can buy e.g fresh Chanterelles, Shatake and Oyster mushrooms. You can also buy a wide variety of dried mushrooms although they tend to be quite expensive. These aren't commonly used in British cuisine, but then i don't cook British food that often!

wikipedia says that Porcini and Ceps are the same Boletus edulis. Did you mean chanterelle, maybe?

Sorry, yes, i did mean Chanterelles!

Do you collect it on your own?

I use dried mushrooms. There are plenty of places in the UK to pick wild mushrooms, but i don't know enough about them. I'd probably end up 6 feet under if i tried picking and cooking them!

PS; The mushroom ' Shatake' is misspelled. The first a should be replaced with i. Software on here is censoring the name lol!
zetigrek
7 Dec 2012  #18
If there's no tradition within your family to pick them, better not to do it. Even I do it with someone who knows them better than me. Once after years of break from picking mushrooms I mistook ordinary chantarelles with some similar mushrooms on thin leg... hopely my father was near to ask me what am I doing for heaven's sake! :)

PS; The mushroom ' Shatake' is mispelled. The first a shold be replaced with i. Software on here is censoring the name lol!

Why? :D
Is it a curse in Japanese?
valpomike 11 | 197
7 Dec 2012  #19
Are there also Truffels in Poland, if so, where are they, and why don't we hear anything on them?

Valpomike
gumishu 11 | 5,012
7 Dec 2012  #20
there are no truffles in Poland
pam
7 Dec 2012  #21
Is it a curse in Japanese?

Lol! No. The name is Sh*take. Look at the first 4 letters, and replace asterisk with letter i. Software doesn't allow swear words!
berni23 7 | 379
8 Dec 2012  #22
Lol! No. The name is Sh*take.

LOL And i thought its a swear word in Japanese for you know what. :D
zetigrek
8 Dec 2012  #23
there are no truffles in Poland

Actually there are some but are rare and nobody looks for them (they grow underground and one needs a trained dog or... swine;)
jon357 63 | 14,122
8 Dec 2012  #24
ctually there are some but are rare

Actually, not much rarer than in countries where they are harvested. Delicious.


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