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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


kaprys 2 | 2,127
16 Jun 2019 #391
I've heard both versions of the etymology of the saying (though my history teachee mentioned just but the previous) but if we're to translate it into English, why mix them?

@Chemikiem
Well done :)
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
16 Jun 2019 #392
Poland was in turmoil fighting a civil war with some supporting August II and others supporting Stanislaw I.

Thanks for the history lesson Iron, I know who to ask for Polish history help now :) I certainly didn't know the background behind the saying.

original saying od sasa do lasa refered to horses in the carriage: sas meant left or slowly while las meant the gate

Aha, very interesting. That idiom has obviously been around for a long time, is it in common use today?

Well done :)

Thanks Kaprys :)
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
16 Jun 2019 #393
why mix them?

OK, let`s not mix them.:):)

Thanks Kaprys :)

Hey, it doesn`t mean that I don`t think well done just because I don`t write it - I think it but in silence. :)

is it in common use today?

Hard to say how common it is, but certainly it hasn`t been forgotten and people use it.

Many years ago my sister gave me a dictionary of Polish vulgarisms for birthday and I read it all but today remember only one saying: pr...k (penis) struck into baubles and there will be no Christmas gifts.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
16 Jun 2019 #394
I think it but in silence. :)

I'll thank you for that silent thought then:)

certainly it hasn`t been forgotten and people use it.

I've heard many idioms, but never that one.

pr...k (penis) struck into baubles and there will be no Christmas gifts.

Haha ,this is the next one and not a joke as I thought isn't it?
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
16 Jun 2019 #395
Come on, I never joke in my serious threads. This one is dead serious.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
17 Jun 2019 #396
Ok, I'll put on my serious face and behave seriously ;) I need time. That idiom is conjuring up visions I would rather not think about about.......
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
18 Jun 2019 #397
Before I forget - mafketis mentioned hare. I have seen rabbit twice within 2 days in fora`s comments. It is a tricky one because it barely refers to an animal. It is used about males with pejorative meaning. Also, it is usually accompanied by certain context words which I won`t reveal yet to make it more difficult.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
18 Jun 2019 #398
pr...k (penis) struck into baubles and there will be no Christmas gifts.

Is this similar in meaning to ' after the birds ' ? Too late, after the fact, nothing can be done about a situation?
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
18 Jun 2019 #399
Yes, but.... :):) . It means nothing can be done but it puts stress on the feeling of failure and disappointment because sth went completely wrong, and not that sth is too late.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
18 Jun 2019 #400
Ok, thanks for elaborating.
I can only think of something obvious with the rabbit idiom, that men f*ck like rabbits, but it won't be that, it's too simple.
johnny reb 20 | 4,597
18 Jun 2019 #401
that men f*ck like rabbits

And women f*ck like minks.
johnny reb 20 | 4,597
18 Jun 2019 #403
Well it is a Polish idioms isn't it ?
What is good for the goose is good for the gander.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
19 Jun 2019 #404
Read post # 397. The idiom is referring specifically to men, or are you just trying to trash this thread?
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
23 Jun 2019 #405
I can only think of something obvious with the rabbit idiom, that men f*ck like rabbits, but it won't be that, it's too simple.

Nope, too easy.

Also, it is usually accompanied by certain context words which I won`t reveal yet to make it more difficult.

Now it is time. The rabbit is mostly accompanied by the relatives or the family of the rabbit.

Before I forget - what object do you call a little monkey/monkling?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
23 Jun 2019 #406
The rabbit is mostly accompanied by the relatives or the family of the rabbit.

I'm not sure how well I'll explain this but I'll give it a go. I think the 'rabbit' is someone who thinks he's more important than he actually is, and the 'relatives' and 'family' of his, are the hangers-on, the sycophants or brown nosers he surrounds himself with. His adoring public, if you like. I could be barking up the wrong tree completely, but that's my best guess. Reminds me of a couple of people on PF, but I best not say any more ;)

a little monkey/monkling?

Small bottle of vodka?
mafketis 23 | 7,829
23 Jun 2019 #407
I think the 'rabbit' is someone who thinks he's more important than he actually is, and the 'relatives' and 'family' of his

I'm thinking maybe the rabbit is the groom....

Small bottle of vodka?

Small 100 or 200 ml (both or just 200?) bottle of any alcohol...
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
23 Jun 2019 #408
I'm thinking maybe the rabbit is the groom....

How would that be pejorative about males though? Or are you talking grooming and not weddings............

Small 100 or 200 ml (both or just 200?) bottle of any alcohol...

Ok thanks, not sure why I just thought it was vodka.
kaprys 2 | 2,127
23 Jun 2019 #409
Rabbit as królik?
I can't think of anything. ...
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
23 Jun 2019 #410
Reminds me of a couple of people on PF, but I best not say any more ;)

You are a true gentleman. :)

Rabbit as królik?

Królik but not as an animal, namely who?

think the 'rabbit' is someone who thinks he's more important than he actually is

This part is correct, the rest not.
As for a monkling,
yes, it refers to a small bottle of vodka because they don`t produce wine or beer in such small ones.



mafketis 23 | 7,829
23 Jun 2019 #411
Królik but not as an animal, namely who?

ólól

is a dimunitive of król? little king? a big fish in a small pond?
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
23 Jun 2019 #412
Yes, maf! Little king! What is the context of saying relatives or family of the little king?
mafketis 23 | 7,829
23 Jun 2019 #413
@pawian

hangers on? horse holders? crew? posse?

(I've never heard monkling before, it sounds more like an apprentice monk than a small money....)
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
23 Jun 2019 #414
hangers on? horse holders? crew? posse?

No, rememebr we are talking about a little king (mostly fake one), not big real one. :)

(I've never heard monkling before, it sounds more like an apprentice monk than a small money....)

Don`t worry, me neither, but what is our imagination for? :):)

Maf, we are playing in this thread, so don`t be so stiff. :):) Besides, I also said little monkey for better understanding.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
23 Jun 2019 #415
relatives or family of the little king?

People that will do his bidding? Minions?
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
23 Jun 2019 #416
Thanks, Chemikiem and maf for that abundant set of vocabulary but the saying is mostly used to point to corruption while employing people - the official term is nepotism. The rabbit/little king chooses his own kin, usually lacking proper qualifications or qualities, for positions in his company, and really qualified guys are turned down.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,113
23 Jun 2019 #417
Aha........good one. Seems so obvious once you know what it is! In the UK, a term that is more or less equivalent is 'jobs for the boys'.
mafketis 23 | 7,829
23 Jun 2019 #418
The rabbit/little king chooses his own kin, usually lacking proper qualifications

A variant is a person who hires incompetent people (who know they owe their position to their connections and loyalty and are not a threat)
kaprys 2 | 2,127
24 Jun 2019 #419
Ahhhh - with friends it makes more sense.

But it does come from 'rabbit' as in Rabbit from Winnie the Pooh.
OP pawian 163 | 10,430
24 Jun 2019 #420
What makes you think so? I thought it`s a mockery of the word king.

that men f*ck like rabbits,

This thought reminded me of another idiom which may also be misleading.

to screw sb in. Of course, no vulgar meanings are involved. But it is a negative activity, nevertheless.


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