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Funny/strange/deviant words in the Polish language


tomekcatkins 8 | 130
19 Aug 2009 #1
Do you know funny/strange/deviant words in the Polish language? I found two:

1) Parasol / parasolka (przeciwsłoneczna) - 'para (el) sol' means 'for the sun' in Spanish, but the Polish use the name for an umbrella. The word 'parasolka (przeciwsłoneczna)' (little parasol (against the sun)) refers to a sunshade on the other hand.

2) Prysznic - The Polish word for shower refers to the surname of a Czech hydrotherapist
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincenz_Priessnitz
while in most other languages the word for shower is derived from the Italian 'doccia' (from the Latin 'ducere' - 'to lead/guide')
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ducere
benszymanski 8 | 465
19 Aug 2009 #2
but the Polish use the name for an umbrella

and ironically "umbrella" which in English we use to shield from rain comes from the latin "umbella" meaning "shade, shadow".
OP tomekcatkins 8 | 130
19 Aug 2009 #3
Well, now that's interesting! Didn't know that. Then the French word 'parapluie' (pluie = rain) makes more sense. :P
Piorun - | 658
19 Aug 2009 #4
How about ekstrahuje form of ekstrahować

which reminds me of a joke

Podchodzi sprzątaczka do laboranta:
sprzątaczka - Co Pan robi?
laborant - EkstraHUJE
sprzątaczka -To ja poproszę dwa!
OP tomekcatkins 8 | 130
19 Aug 2009 #5
Could you explain what's curious about the 'ekstrahuje'-form of 'ekstrahować' in English, Piorun? :-)
Does 'huje' has something to do with 'chuje' or something?
Myszolow 3 | 157
20 Aug 2009 #6
Does 'huje' has something to do with 'chuje' or something?

h and ch are pronounced the same in Polish so anything with that ending gets a schoolboy snigger. ;)

My wife was telling me about a hilarious latin lesson when they were learning the declension of hic, haec, hoc. And someone had to read it out without laughing. It goes something like this...

hic haec hoc
hunc hanc hoc
hujus hujus hujus
huic huic huic
hoc hoc hoc

...bet it was hilarious.
mafketis 21 | 7,458
20 Aug 2009 #7
Does 'huje' has something to do with 'chuje' or something?

ekstrahuje sounds just like 'ekstra chuje' (where ekstra means something like 'great!' 'wonderful!')

and while the 'correct' spelling is chuj the tradition in grafitti has usually been to write it huj, so it even looks like ...
cinek 2 | 338
20 Aug 2009 #8
Do you know funny/strange/deviant words in the Polish language

'Rower' (bicycle) is derived from name of a manufacturer of bicycles (Rover).

Cinek
benszymanski 8 | 465
20 Aug 2009 #9
Here's another strange thing I noticed in Polish - words such as "biznesmen" to mean a businessman. For some reason they adopted the plural "men" and not "man" which doesn't seem that logical to me. Same thing with "supermen" where you hear things such as "on jest supermenem".

I guess that the reason for this could be that "men" is the more natural sound in Polish, but then how comes they went with "man" in barman and barmanka?
mafketis 21 | 7,458
20 Aug 2009 #10
I think it might be vowel harmony,

basically Polish doesn't have the sound in English 'man' and to Poles it sounds like either Polish a or e depending on the context and the choice of e or a in borrowings from English seems to depend on the previous vowel

barman
rockman (rocker)

dżentelmen (gentleman)
biznesmen
supermen

There might be some exceptions but I think that makes some sense.
OP tomekcatkins 8 | 130
21 Aug 2009 #11
The Americans tend to speak the 'a' as an 'e', so maybe the Polish adopted the "American pronunciation".
As well I believe the British pronounce the 'a' in 'gentleman' more as an 'u' (as in 'run') then as an 'a'.
Sasha 2 | 1,083
21 Aug 2009 #12
huj

Does it have same meaning as it does in Russian? :))
mafketis 21 | 7,458
21 Aug 2009 #13
(c)huj in Polish refers to a uniquely male part of the anatomy.
Sasha 2 | 1,083
21 Aug 2009 #14
So your answer is yes. :) That's interesting... I didn't any other Slavs used it in this meaning, a lot understand though.
cinek 2 | 338
21 Aug 2009 #15
I didn't any other Slavs used it in this meaning

Not only this one...
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
22 Aug 2009 #16
Sasha - Kak nazywajetsja eto pa russki? Chwost?
(What's it in Russian - khvost?)

Doesn't tusz (as in wziąć tusz) exist in Polish anymore for shower? Presumably from French douche. I think I saw it in Dyzma, but maybe that was pre-war Polish.
Lorenc 4 | 28
22 Aug 2009 #17
I'd like to make some side remarks prompted by the etymologies quoted by tomekcatkins in the first message. First, according to Polish Wikipedia pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parasol the Polish word "parasol" comes from Italian "parasole":

"Słowo parasol pochodzi od włoskiego parasole co dosłownie znaczy słońcochron."
In turn, the Italian word "parasole" is composed by "para-", a common prefix meaning "to shelter" and "sole" (sun).

I don't know if Italian "parasole" is truly an Italian invention or if it was taken by some other (necessarily romance) language. In any case, as far as I know, the common words for it in Spanish are quitasol or sombrilla.

About "doccia", according to the Garzanti dictionary, it comes from Latin "ductione(m)", in meaning (water) duct/pipe [naturally, ductionem does ultimately come from "ducere"=to conduct/lead, so the quoted etymology is not incorrect].

Turning to Polish, something a noticed in my little experience with it is that it sometimes (often?) uses different words than most other European languages, including slavic ones.

Take, for example, the word "moon"/księżyc; its name in other slavic languages is (looking at wikipedia):

Polish: Księżyc
Czech: Měsíc
Slovak:Mesiac
Croatian: Mjesec
Slovene: Luna
Bulgarian: Луна
Russian: Луна
Ukrainian: Місяць
Belorussian: Месяц
Macedonian: Месечина

A part from Polish, we can see in all these languages the occurrence of the Latin (and modern Italian, Spanish, French etc.) root "Luna" or of a slavic root exemplified by e.g. Czech Měsíc. Why not in Polish? What's the etymology of księżyc ?
mafketis 21 | 7,458
22 Aug 2009 #18
Doesn't tusz (as in wziąć tusz) exist in Polish anymore for shower?

Never heard it. I've only heard tusz in the meaning 'ink' (especially computer printers) and 'mascara'.
Sasha 2 | 1,083
23 Aug 2009 #19
Not only this one...

Russian too. My Czech friend understand that as well.

Sasha - Kak nazywajetsja eto pa russki? Chwost?
(What's it in Russian - khvost?)

Polonius I think I got your logic. :) Did you look up the etymology of the word "huj"?
Khvost means "tail". E.g. dog's tail=psiny khvost.

Russian: Луна

Actually both: luna and mesjac. Depending on a stage of a month. When it's round it's luna, when it's half or less then mesjac. Although nobody pays attention to that fact and everyone picks the word he wants. Luna is more romantic word I guess... so if you have a stroll with a gall better use "luna".
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
23 Aug 2009 #20
I think I read somewhere once that it came form książę - meaning a princely celestial body, but not sure???

I know many feel Wikipedia is none too reliable but it does include tusz as shower:

Tusz
Nazwa tego hasła odnosi się do więcej niż jednego pojęcia.
tusz (farba)
rysunek wykonany tuszem
kosmetyk do rzęs
prysznic, natrysk
fanfara
touche (szermierka) (czyt. tusz) – dotknięcie przeciwnika bronią
tusz (zapasy) – położenie przeciwnika na łopatki
panama
8 Jan 2010 #21
the best word ever in Polish - wichajster (wie heisst er)
Lenka 3 | 1,514
8 Jan 2010 #22
"Tuszę" can also mean:"I think","in my opinion" but it's not used today.
vetala - | 382
8 Jan 2010 #23
A part from Polish, we can see in all these languages the occurrence of the Latin (and modern Italian, Spanish, French etc.) root "Luna" or of a slavic root exemplified by e.g. Czech Měsíc. Why not in Polish? What's the etymology of księżyc ?

'Miesiąc' used to mean 'moon' a long time ago but now it's no longer used in this context (now it means 'month'). It's the same with many other words such as 'lico' old Polish for face, still in use in some other Slavic languages.
Zafrira - | 5
8 Jan 2010 #24
According to Wikipedia, the word 'księżyc" centuries ago meant "książę" = "prince". The general name for moon was then, as Vetala wrote, "miesiąc", but every month the moon was believed to be a young son of the former one ("king"), that's why between new moon and the first quarter it was called prince, "księżyc". Later on it became a general name and replaced "miesiąc".
enkidu 7 | 623
9 Jan 2010 #25
Fart - sudden struck of luck. Like when you avoid car accident by inches.
Then you fart.
barcelonesa
1 Apr 2011 #26
But the Spanish word for umbrella is paraguas--literally "para" (for) + "agua" (water).
Chrzaszcz 12 | 103
6 Nov 2011 #27
Of course, the English word 'Lunatic' has derived from 'lunaticus' believing the moon has an effect on mental health.
There was once a Lunacy Act 1890-1922.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
6 Nov 2011 #28
Trust me, it does.

Ask anyone who's worked in an asylum.
sa11y 5 | 331
21 Aug 2012 #29
[Moved from]: What are your favorite lines in Polish movies?

Polish movies (especially those from communist era) have very specific kind of humor.
Have you got any favorite lines that you could share with the rest of us?
One of my favorites is "Kopernik Byla kobieta! ("Copernicus was a women!") from "Seksmisja".
Other good one: "Londyn? Nie ma takiego miasta Londyn! Jest Lądek, Lądek Zdrój! (London? There is no such town as London. There is Lądek, Lądek Zdrój!) - this is from "Miś".
kotlomoy - | 10
4 Jan 2013 #30
I like Seksmisja though I didn't see any other Polish movies.


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