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Czech language sounds like baby talk to most Poles. Similarities?


Ziemowit 12 | 3,101    
17 Jun 2011  #121
And here is what sang Andrzej Rosiewicz in his famous song:
German ladies:
Niemki czyste, oczywiste, dobre są na żonę,
Miałbyś zawsze wysprzątane mieszkanie z balkonem,
Lecz jak czułbyś się w tym domu czystym, oczywistym,
Gdyby w kuchni ktoś przy dziecku mówił po niemiecku???

Czech ladies:
Czeszka tylko mnie rozśmiesza, chociaż lubię Czechów -
Gdybym wydał sie za Czeszkę, umarłbym ze śmiechu!

Polish ladies:
Najwięcej witaminy mają polskie dziewczyny
I to jest prawda, to jest fakt: dziewczęcy urok, wdzięk i takt...
I chyba w całym świecie piękniejszych nie znajdziecie.
Za jeden uśmiech oddałbym Chicago, Paryż, Krym!


In a way, he was of the same view as this famous Czech man ...
sobieski 107 | 2,133    
17 Jun 2011  #122
By the way, what is the origin of the "pepiki" byword for the Czechs? Does it have a special meaning? Where does it come from?

From what I know, it is not a malicious thing.
A lot of countries call their neighbors names, so I was wondering.... And what Poles call for example Slovaks?
We Flemish for example call the Dutch "cheese-heads" :))))
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997    
17 Jun 2011  #123
sobieski

By the way, what is the origin of the "pepiki" byword for the Czechs? Does it have a special meaning? Where does it come from?
From what I know, it is not a malicious thing.

Pepik is the petty name for Josef, that is, it means Joe. Nothing malicious.

A lot of countries call their neighbors names, so I was wondering.... And what Poles call for example Slovaks?

No special name but a close friend of mine calls Slovaks "The Romanians of Europe!" meaning he wishes them all the worst ;) All colleagues at his work laugh at him for his anti-Slovakism ;)
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #124
From what I know, it is not a malicious thing.

It is rather unpleasant, I am afraid. Pepík is a diminutive of the name Josef, but not necessarily a pet name. Compare with Polish Józek or Józiek.

Calling a whole nation "Józki / Jóźki" is derogatory and patronising.

If you're Flemish, think of a given name you would associate with a rather stupid, slow, and slovenly man in your country, and imagine another nation is calling you that. Of course, you can live with it, but it's definitely not pleasant.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997    
17 Jun 2011  #125
a pet name.

I said "petty name".

We Mazovian call Greater Poles "pyry" (potatoes), Cracowers are called "centusie" (stingies), and all of them call us "warszawka" (petty Warsaw). So what? Silesian call themselves "hanysy" (Johnnies), they call the rest of the world "gorole" (hilanders) ;-) so what?
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #126
But you do agree that pyry, centusie, or gorole are meant to sound slightly derogatory and / or funny? Than what's the deal with saying that pepiki is OK? It's not OK, it's a put-down ;-P

What makes me angry about pepiki is that Polish people use the name and claim it's harmless. That's it's actually rather nice. No, it's not nice, and if you use it, please be aware of what you are actually saying. If you want to make fun of Czechs, by all means use it. If you want to be nice to them, then don't use it, because it won't work.

Do you understand what I'm driving at?

Also, "pepiki" doesn't work even in friendly banter, for some reason. The level of contempt it contains is too high. It's simply not a friendly name. Take it from a Czech.
OP RobertLee 4 | 73    
17 Jun 2011  #127
I personally find the Polish myth of the "childishness" of Czech extremely offensive and patronising. It's like a whole nation is patted on the head and told to go outside and play while the adults have a serious conversation. ;-/

That analogy is funny too ;) Seriously, it's strange that you have such strong feelings about it, when you know that Poles don't have bad intentions here. And they won't suddenly stop laughing at Czech language just because you find it offensive.
Zman    
17 Jun 2011  #128
It is rather unpleasant, I am afraid. Pepík is a diminutive of the name Josef, but not necessarily a pet name. Compare with Polish Józek or Józiek.

You must feel very vulnerable Magdalena. By saying "Pepiki" we do not mean harm. It's just a fun way to describe Czechs. On the other hand, my Czech friend (dwelling in Prague) told me that you guys sometimes call Poles: "Antek" or even "bosy Antek". LOL I liked that because that's how my Grandma referred to people in her village who were of lower status, poor individuals. :-)

By the way, "PEPIK" derives from "Padre Putativo" aka St.Joseph.

Poles do not do harm to Czechs by using it, and moreover it's not so popular nowadays anyway.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #129
Seriously, it's strange that you have such strong feelings about it, when you know that Poles don't have bad intentions here. And they won't suddenly stop laughing at Czech language just because you find it offensive.

Yeah, the Poles are ever the wide-eyed innocents, never meaning any harm, never a bad intention between the lot of them ;-)
About the laughing: let's try a simple linguistic experiment, shall we?

"Riž sta dve vrsti iz družine Poaceae (trave), in sicer Oryza sativa in Oryza glaberrima. Izvorno obmoèje riža so tropski in subtropski deli južne in jugovzhodne Azije ter Afrika. Riž je vir veè kot petine kalorij, ki jih zaužije èloveštvo.[1] (izraz »divji riž« se lahko nanaša na divje vrste rodu Oryza, navadno pa na divje in udomaèene vrste sorodnega rodu Zizania.) Je enoletna rastlina in zraste med 1 in 1,8 m visoko, ob ustreznih tleh pa lahko nekatere sorte zrastejo še višje. Za vzgojo je potrebno dosti vode in dela. Zelo je razširjen v deželah s ceneno delovno silo. Kultiviranje riža se je zaèelo hkrati pred veè kot 6500 leti v veè deželah. Letna proizvodnja znaša približno 600 milijonov ton in na prelomu 21. stoletja je prehitela proizvodnjo pšenice ter koruze.[2] Generalna skupšèina OZN je proglasila leto 2004 za leto riža."

"Rýže (Oryza) je rod jednoděložných rostlin z èeledi lipnicovitých. Původ má v tropických oblastech Afriky a Asie. Je známo asi 20 druhů. Celkově rýže dodává asi dvacet procent[1] kalorické spotřeby lidské populace.

Rod rýže se dá rozdělit na rýži setou a rýži horskou.[zdroj?] Rýže setá je nejrozšířenější, ale je nároèná na zavlažování. Nejkvalitnější odrůdy jsou vhodné pro vaření a obsahují vysoký podíl škrobu. Oproti tomu horská rýže není tak nároèná na zavlažování a mnohde se pěstuje bez závlahy. Výnosy tohoto druhu jsou však nižší a zrno není tak kvalitní.

Zrno rýže je tvarované velmi různě. Jsou zrna podlouhlá, oválná až kulatá, krátká a dlouhá. Od tvarů pak plynou názvy odrůd: dlouhozrnná, krátkozrnná, kulatozrnná."

We have here two Wiki texts about rice. One is in Czech, the other in Slovenian. I am not even sure you will know which is which, but let's try. Find the Czech text and point out to me how it is inherently more funny to a Pole than the Slovenian. If you can do that, I'll eat my hat.

By saying "Pepiki" we do not mean harm. It's just a fun way to describe Czechs.

I just explained in a post above that your intentions have nothing to do with it. The Czechs somehow do not find it funny.

you guys sometimes call Poles: "Antek" or even "bosy Antek"

Never ever heard that one.

By the way, "PEPIK" derives from "Padre Putativo" aka St.Joseph.

So does "Józiek". That doesn't make it sound any better.

Poles do not do harm to Czechs by using it,

Sure, nobody's gonna die because of it, but could you possibly try to understand it's just not terribly nice, so if you use it, don't be surprised if at least some Czechs get annoyed.
sobieski 107 | 2,133    
17 Jun 2011  #130
We Mazovian call Greater Poles "pyry" (potatoes),

I thought this applies to "Poznańskie Piry" ? In my native Flanders almost every village has a by-name given by the next village. And these days nobody, except for the local schoolteacher has an idea where it comes from. Not considering the cities even :)

Not that I would expect a redneck to understand this.
delphiandomine 87 | 16,884    
17 Jun 2011  #131
That analogy is funny too ;) Seriously, it's strange that you have such strong feelings about it, when you know that Poles don't have bad intentions here. And they won't suddenly stop laughing at Czech language just because you find it offensive.

I find it stranger that a non-Polish speaker tries to comment on such a thing.

Seriously man, you don't speak Polish, so you've got absolutely no clue how Czech sounds.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #132
"Antek" or even "bosy Antek"

Google says: No results found for "bosý Antek".
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
17 Jun 2011  #133
Than what's the deal with saying that pepiki is OK

My Czech friend Marketa told me in her language that's simply a boys name, Pepik. I don't think Poles say it derogatorily more neutrally. Like Poles call Silesians, Hanysy.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #134
in her language that's simply a boys name, Pepik

I never said it wasn't. So now tell your friend "Vy Češi jste takový pepíci. My Poláci vám tak říkáme protože nám to připadá vtipný."
Lyzko    
17 Jun 2011  #135
Every nationality thinks other related languages sound "funny". The Spanish think the Portuguese sound like children with the musical accent of their language, the Swedes think the Danes sounds drunken and dull, to the Dane, the Swede sounds pompous, sarcastic, smug and bored (hence, boring), the Germans find Dutch like the babbling of idiots, Dutchmen think Germans are forever barking loud orders with gutteral correctness etc..... It's all sociolectal impression, that's all.
OP RobertLee 4 | 73    
17 Jun 2011  #136
I find it stranger that a non-Polish speaker tries to comment on such a thing.

Seriously man, you don't speak Polish, so you've got absolutely no clue how Czech sounds.

I told you once and repeat it here for more people to see: I'm willing to take a Polish language, Polish literature and Polish history test and if my results are better than yours - you get the f**k out of this forum, crawling back into your hole. Why do you hide the fact that you are Russian?
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
17 Jun 2011  #137
Vy Češi jste takový pepíci. My Poláci vám tak říkáme protože nám to připadá vtipný."

You Czechs are those Pepiks. Us Poles say that because we thinks it's amusing. Did I get it close enough?? ;) But you're wrong Magdalena, Poles don't have any resentment towards Czechs I've never heard anyone say that angrily or laughing, it's a neutral saying. Like if they called us Janki or something like that.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #138
Like if they called us Janki or something like that.

OK, the Poles are Jóźki. Polacy to jóźki takie. Do you like it? Cause it's not Janek, its Józiek with all the negative connotations.
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
17 Jun 2011  #139
Polacy to jóźki takie

OK i see what you mean, kind of like in Poland someone calls an another person a Bolek, even though it's a name it also has a negative meaning, Bolek's someone you mock. P.S. Magdalena I've never used Pepiki always Czesi.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #140
I've never used Pepiki always Czesi.

Calm down, it's OK, I just wanted to get my point across ;-)
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
17 Jun 2011  #141
I've been calm, I thought you were upset.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997    
17 Jun 2011  #142
se pěstuje

Although "pěstovat lásku" especially to the homeland makes me smile a little ;) True, it is not easy for most guys there distinguish Czech and Slovenian and I seem not to see many comments on that from the posters?

I thought this applies to "Poznańskie Piry"?

Pyry, Wielkopolanie = people of Wielkopolska, the Greater Poland, Poznań being the capital of.

Like Poles call Silesians, Hanysy.

Wrong. It is Silesians calling themselves Hanysy. When a non-Silesian uses this word, it becomes derogatory unless the person using that word is "gorol ale oswojony" (hilander but a domesticated one).

OK i see what you mean, kind of like in Poland someone calls an another person a Bolek, even though it's a name it also has a negative meaning, Bolek's someone you mock.

Recently, it is Andrzej ;-)

...
The guy in orange glasses is Pan Andrzej ;-)
strzyga 2 | 993    
17 Jun 2011  #143
its Józiek with all the negative connotations.

and what are the negative connotations of Józiek?
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #144
Józiek would be the slightly retarded, unsophisticated, and unkempt brother of Józef ;-)
strzyga 2 | 993    
17 Jun 2011  #146
Józiek would be the slightly retarded, unsophisticated, and unkempt brother of Józef ;-)

would he now? I rather like the sound of it, but if you say so, ok :)
and just to make it clear, I don't know any Józiek.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #147
No, that would be Roman.

Marian, esp. so-called "wonsaty marian" ;-)
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997    
17 Jun 2011  #148
A little back on topic.

The forgotten thing about the Silesian language is the influence of the Czech language, and I would even say, the ancient Czech.

From the song "Gelynder Blues":

Ja wom godom idźcie do dom kerejście gorole som
A jak nie to posuchejcie můj gelynder blues
.

The ones of you who understand Polish: Is is Polish? Is it German? Is it Czech? Does it sound funny to the Polish ear?

Marian, esp. so-called "wonsaty marian" ;-)

Eh? No, Stefan! Bronisław or Bronek is good!
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
17 Jun 2011  #149
The forgotten thing about the Silesian language i

Silesian Czech and Polish dialects, as well as highlander Polish and Slovak dialects, overlap very nicely... :-)

Silesian dialect (language?)"

krajane.czu.cz/geografie-nab/doku.php?id=slezstina
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997    
17 Jun 2011  #150
For the umptieth time, I have to say the Silesian is a language, identified by an ISO code. Saying Silesian is a dialect makes Czech a dialect, too. I could mention that Silesians have their revivalists, too.

szl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Przod%C5%84o_zajta

You should feel at home, Magda.

STRZYGA!

Strziga (ze łaćiny striga bez grecke "stris" ), abo mynski uodpowjydńik strzigůń je to dymůn ze prasłowjańskich wjerzyńůw, uobecny tyż we kulturze, bojkach a uosprowkach wywodzůncych śe ze rygjůnu Ślůnska. Coby tako strziga ńy můgła ludźům szkůdźić, trza jům bůło wykopać a przebić ji śerce dymbowym kołkym (we Ślůnsku, bo kaj ińdźi godało śe, co nojlepszy je uośinowy), abo ji uoberznůńć gowa a wraźić ji jům mjyndzy nogi. Jak już kogo za żywobyćo mjeli we podejzdrzyńu, co po śmjyrći może śe uostać strzigům, to go chowali gymbům na důł a wstyrczali mu do gymby kamjyń.

Hahaha!



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