The BEST Guide to POLAND
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Posts by Lyzko  

Joined: 12 Jul 2013 / Male ♂
Warnings: 2 - AA
Last Post: 11 hrs ago
Threads: 33
Posts: 8,007
From: New York, USA
Speaks Polish?: tak
Interests: podrozy, rozrywki, sport

Displayed posts: 8040 / page 262 of 268
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Lyzko   
29 May 2015
History / Give Poland back it's lost land ! [132]

Hey, folks! I agree that the base thread is ultra-silly! Yet while we're on the subject of giving, resp. getting "back" lost land, let's at least be accurate about which land allegedly belonged to whom. As such can probably never be proven by some sort of Platonic "Ur-deed" way back when, it'll just plain never get resolved, and we'll all have to deal with it as is, PERIOD!

Think of the old Arab-Israeli Conflict as an analogy. There never was a founding document in Biblical times, only a distant inkling on either side that's festered into a mega- bad case of "G-d said, they said"!!!
Lyzko   
29 May 2015
History / Give Poland back it's lost land ! [132]

Fine. So long as it is understood, if not accepted, that so-called "German lands" in the "former East", may not ever have been "German" at all, but instead, booty of the Teutonic Knights:-)
Lyzko   
28 May 2015
History / Give Poland back it's lost land ! [132]

"Lost" territories, TheOther?? Hmmm, seems to me that's historically debatable. To be sure, former Germans lands stretched far beyond the more limited region parceled out to them than is the case today. However, many of those were the results of Crusades and conquests by among others, the Livonian Knights during the Middle Ages, so who then is to say that they are actually German, and not originally Polish territories??

:-)
Lyzko   
28 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

Of the two languages, Russian on the one hand, has borrowed comparatively less from, say, Latin, in contrast with Polish(..which is in no wise to initimate that Russians hasn't also borrowed plenty!), preferring to use more of her own native "Slavic" roots, cf. Polish "literatura" vs. Russian "slovonictvo", or some such construction:-)

Russian aspects are almost identical with Polish, as near as I can tell.
Lyzko   
27 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

...Anna, Annuszka, Annusia.... plus Polish has that Vocative case, no longer extant in modern Russian, I'm told:-)

Suckered into the same trap again, I fearLOL

"Anna" "Anno", Anniuszka!" "Anniusia"....

It's late and I'm getting sloppy (but still no excuse!)

I recently learned that Russian "karadash" is derived from Turkish. Polish "Ołówek" is probably pure Slavic?
lol
Lyzko   
27 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

Most enlightening, Vlad! Many thanks:-)

I have noticed a similarity between Polish and Russian diminutives, however. Seems the Poles though also go slightly overboard on the subject of intimacy, e.g. Małgorzata < Małgosia < Gosia/Gosiu! < Gocha/Gochu! etc..
Lyzko   
27 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

You're right, Vlad! However, English also knows the more latinate "autumn" (cf. Italian "autuno"), but "fall" surely refers to the falling of leaves (as does the Polish). Interestingly certain Germanic tongues emphasize the cognate 'calque' for "harvest", e.g. German "der Herbst", Dutch "de herfst", Swedish "hoest" etc...

Check out the Czech names for the months.
Lyzko   
26 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

Vlad, only watch out for "łaska" vs. "laska"!! The former means "walking stick". A single slip of a key stroke can either create a different word, and/or type a different word with a wholly different meaning:-)) Cf. "łaski" (walking sticks) and "łąski" (narrow)...

Typo! I "meant" "laska" in Polish.
Lyzko   
26 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

Vlad' ol' man, NO OTHER Slavic language sounds like Polish!! The others all lost the nasals, plus Slovene and Czech both retained their long vs,.short vowels:-)
Lyzko   
25 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

Vlad, as a professional linguist, I can linguistically vouch for both the syntactic as well as semantic closeness of Polish with Czech, not that there are not false friend traps galore, e.g. "Obchód na korze", the title of a popular 1966 Czech film! In English, it is translated as "The Shop on Main Street". In Polish, the meaning is, well, rather differentLOL There's of course Polish "szukać" vs. Czech "szukat", Polish "stały" vs. "Czech "staly", Polish "pożar" vs. Czech "pozar" etc... The months are also quite different, yet more Ur-Slavic vs. the latinized Russian equivalents!

On the other hand, certain basic words such as Polish "tydzień" cf. "tyden" in Czech, "Dzień dobry" and "Dobry den" point to a closer day-to-day proximity, not to mention the buzzing sounds of Polish and Czech, compared to the much more exaggerated palatalization of Russian and Ukrainian.

R.U.R. while it is true that the average English speaker faced with a German or Dutch text, having never studied either of those languages, will be as doubtless bewildered as were I too glance casually at "Beowulf" or "Caedmon's Hymn" having never studied Old English, many American -born German students of mine over the years have found German (though NOT Icelandic!!!) much easier to get a superficial handle on than even Spanish or Italian.

Slavic languages words similarities with Polish, is what this thread is about.
Lyzko   
24 May 2015
History / POLAND: EASTERN or CENTRAL European country? [1071]

I generally speak of "Middle Europe" when referring to countries such Austria, Czechoslovakia aka Czech Republik, Hungary or Switzerland. Central Europe also includes Slovenia, Albania and Macedonia. Poland? Well, it has the strong historical influences from the Catholic West, namely, Rome (located in South Central Italy), therefore, I tend to classify Poland as Central European, yet she is physically located much further East, while having a much more Continental influence than, say, Romania or Bulgaria, which are closer to countries such as Greece and/or the bridge nation, Turkey!

When Americans especially close their eyes and conjure up a Middle European person/accent etc.., the latter generally sounds like a courtly, Viennese Austrian, decidely Germanic, although not "German" per se, fully of bowing and hand kissing.
Lyzko   
24 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

A more precient theory has been that in fact the Russians themselves are descendants of Rurik the Slav, curiously enough, the same progenitor of the present-day Swedes:-)
Lyzko   
22 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

Vlad, "łyżka" simply means "spoon", "łyżkO" would be the (non-existent) Vocative Case:-)
LOL

I mean, I guess "łyżko" would be conceivable in Polish, merely unusual, to downright odd! Imagine for example in English calling out "O' spoon!!" People would think that rather weird, I'd expect:-)

Then again, Polish also has the possible (yet unused) neuter forms of the first person in the past tense "Ja byłom..." . presumably if a child were speaking. A shame noone's ever been able to test out that theoryLOL
Lyzko   
22 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

I'm merely speaking in general, Vlad! The "list" to which I was referring is in the abstract:-) Odd that you didn't pick up on it. Other than that, your English is rather good.
Lyzko   
21 May 2015
Language / Slavic languages words similarities with Polish [238]

You see, Vlad! Point proven:-)

Apologies for the faulty orthography. Unlike you, I don't always have a google translate at the ready twenty-four-sevenLOL

A common pattern difference between Polish and Russian, is precisely this "added" vowel such as "m[o]r." vs. "mr....", g[o]lodny" vs. "głodny" etc...

...Polish "sklep" (standard word for "shop"/"store") vs. Russian "sklep" (a sort of dirty cellar or room, scarcely a boutique and similar establishment :-))

The list is indeed a long one!
lol