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Posts by Matowy  

Joined: 4 Jul 2009 / Male ♂
Last Post: 5 Jul 2010
Threads: -
Posts: Total: 295 / Live: 230 / Archived: 65
From: United Kingdom.
Speaks Polish?: Only a little. Maybe 2% or so.
Interests: Few and far between.

Displayed posts: 230 / page 8 of 8
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Matowy   
28 Feb 2010
Genealogy / Polish looks? [1366]

I googled it, but I can't quite understand what an "epicanthic fold" is. Is it just an East Asian eye shape?
Matowy   
28 Feb 2010
UK, Ireland / Time for the Poles from the UK to go home [437]

Can you back that up? With workers striking and Labour making promises on immigration that would make the BNP blush, it seems immigration is a major issue in the UK. Although as I am not a resident of the UK, I could be entirely wrong. Am I?

I cannot back it up with anything other than the fact that I live in the UK, and believe myself to have satisfactory political and social awareness to gauge such things based on individual merit with sufficient detachment and perspective.

Immigration is a HUGE issue in the UK at the moment. But really, when hasn't it been? It's been a hot topic all through the second half of the 20'th Century, and at points it has been much more heated than it is today. Just because it is discussed a lot does not mean it is a serious issue. British people simply love to complain about things which, had they even the slightest bit of world awareness, they should realise as being insignificant. For example, there is a ton of whining about how the current government is corrupt and dishonest and inefficient and blah blah blah. Is it? Yes, just like any other government. Is it also one of the most mobile, democratic, rewarding and transparent governments in the world? Also yes. British people are too busy focusing on how bad they have it and how oppressed and stifled they are, but the plain reality is that things are nowhere near as bad as the complaint level. Immigration will continue to be moaned about, and it will continue to be a non-issue, just as it has always been. This country has gone far too long without an invasion or a REAL oppressive regime that people have gotten soft.
Matowy   
28 Feb 2010
UK, Ireland / Time for the Poles from the UK to go home [437]

I'm against gross oversimplification, which is why I'm glad to say that the reality is that the British people as a whole do not care either way whether the Poles stay or not, with the silent majority drifting towards a positive view of the Poles being here.
Matowy   
20 Aug 2009
Life / Why are Poles in other countries called "Plastic Poles"? [168]

On the question of ethnicity, how is it that a Black person can refer to themselves/be referred to as African American (or Afro-Caribbean) or a "brown" or "yellow" (no racism intended) person can be referred to as British-Asian, Chinese etc (when they might never have gone to China, Africa, India etc)?

Those are actually classifications put in place by the government (or at least here it is so). Anyone of Asian ethnicity has to identify themselves as one of those on pretty much any form. Most East Asians are 100% East Asian anyway. Very few of them are born here as of yet. South Asians have also not really been here that long. Black people have term "Black" on the forms, unlike in the U.S where people refer to them as "African-American" for reasons as of yet inexplicable to me.

Personally, I will extend the same ridicule to "African"-Americans that I do to "Polish"-Americans. Neither are African or Polish.
Matowy   
17 Aug 2009
Life / Why are Poles in other countries called "Plastic Poles"? [168]

I have never mis-represented myself that I can remember.

Based on how defensive you're being, I'd say I'm correct in assuming you're one of those Americans who attempts to identify with a foreign country.

Do you presume to know what traditions or values my family practiced?

I don't care what your family did, and neither does anyone else. Doesn't change the fact that you and they are not Polish.

EDIT: And I note the fact that you're using past tense.

I have spaghetti several times a week. I guess I should start calling myself Italian.
Matowy   
17 Aug 2009
Life / Why are Poles in other countries called "Plastic Poles"? [168]

I am a stranger in a strange land wherever I go. Home or abroad. You've opened my eyes. Thank you.

That's not what he said at all. Like your own sense of self-perception, you have twisted it into something foolishly unrecognisable to serve your own limited viewpoints. You might see yourself as Polish(?), but any actual Polish or general European person will see you only as an American laughably trying to be something he is not.
Matowy   
6 Aug 2009
History / WWII - who really was the first to help Poland? [901]

Europe, Russia and America (South and North) are the dominant influences on the world. Have they turned their back on Christ? Is He a joke to them?

Europe - mostly, yes. The most successful and influential countries in Europe are largely secular (UK, Sweden, Norway, Germany, France, etc).

Russia - Also quite secular.

America - LOL. Religion infects U.S politics like a cancer. The rest of the world, Europe especially, can only point and laugh at America's inability to separate Church and State... even though it's in their constitution.
Matowy   
5 Aug 2009
History / WWII - who really was the first to help Poland? [901]

The thing is, nobody wanted to help Poland. Without all the modern-day alliances we have, countries would simply look out for themselves only and not care what happens anywhere else. If Germany had simply conquered Poland and left it at that, nobody would have cared to liberate Poland. Germany's campaign was a threat to the other European nations, and especially to the UK's dominance. That's why there was a war, not because anybody felt any sort of compassion for the oppressed people under Germany's heel.
Matowy   
5 Aug 2009
History / WWII - who really was the first to help Poland? [901]

Its hard not to get a biased answer about issues of war and history.

Hard? It's not hard. It's ******* impossible.

EDIT: I'm no history expert, but from what I recall nobody joined the war with the sole intention of "helping" Poland. They were all in it for themselves. Such is the nature of people.
Matowy   
26 Jul 2009
Life / Bollywood in Poland [32]

dat

Reminds me of this:
grapheine.com/bombaytv/index.php?lang=uk
Matowy   
26 Jul 2009
Life / Bollywood in Poland [32]

Bollywood is atrocious. Actually physically sickening in its mediocrity. When I need the occasional toe-tapping tune, or even a semi-hard-on, I'll maybe YouTube a few Bollywood clips. Other than that, it's quite worthless. Even the ultra-idealized and oh-so-realistic Olympian beauties get boring after a while.
Matowy   
5 Jul 2009
Genealogy / Changing my name to a Polish one [35]

Not another one. How can someone be from so many different nationalities.

Even though this is crudely conveyed, the overall point of what he is saying is quite true. I do not understand why on earth one would want to go so far as to feel a "connection" to ones "heritage" or ancestors. Is the long dead past really so important to you today? People who are so hung up over ethnic/national ties are kind of pathetic in their pretentiousness, in my opinion =/ Whether every single one of your ancestors was born and raised in Poland, it doesn't change the fact that you were born and raised in America, with American citizenship, an American passport, and in an American culture. If you like Poland, then that's fine. Having some Polish "blood" doesn't make you any more or less Polish than anyone other non-Polak.

This is generally a really silly thing I've seen in Americans. They tend to over-emphasize their long lost irrelevant heritage and ethnic ties, so then they go about calling themselves "Irish" or "Polish" or whatever they feel like, when in reality they are no such thing. Ethnic origin does not = citizenship. Only Israel/the Jews is stupid enough for that kind of mind-numbingly limited ethnic-oriented thinking.