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Posts by Marek  

Joined: 15 Feb 2007 / Male ♂
Last Post: 16 Jun 2009
Threads: Total: 4 / Live: 0 / Archived: 4
Posts: Total: 867 / Live: 250 / Archived: 617
From: Nowy Jork
Speaks Polish?: Tak
Interests: rozgrywki, podrozy

Displayed posts: 250 / page 7 of 9
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Marek   
21 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

It has little to do with the present day tensions concerning Turks who dwell in the Federal Republic of Germany along with other countries. It does though have a lot to do with a racist disguised as morally relativist slant these days which attempts to explain, indeed rationalize or justify, obscenely blatant acts of prejudice for which no reason could ever justify such actions!

Granted, most Poles, for that matter, Europeans, prior to the start of WW II were by and large lower middle class to poor. Jews however, owing to the deep anti-Jewish sentiment on the part of the Catholic Church in Europe, were not allowed for centuries to join guilds, become soldiers, own honest businesses, farm etc. compared to their gentile neighbors. The only recourse left to many, unfortunately, was money-lending, heretofore forbidden for Christians.

As a result, when Christians returned from wars and plagues had ravished their communities, those of the Jews were almost unscathed....because they lived in ghettoes, removed from the Christian centers, by local laws. And so they retained their properties when many gentiles had lost theirs, giving the false impression to the Christians that the Jews had somehow 'stolen' their lands, holdings etc.

Patently untrue, the image lasted.
Marek   
20 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Sorry, Seanus. Can't quite catch your drift, I'm afraid. Are you suggesting that somehow the innocent slaughter of returning Jews to their Polish villages after the end of WW II was justified???!

I'm probably missing the point. Kindly illuminate.

PS
What d'you mean exactly by 'bad blood was still flowing'? The issue of Polish anti-semitism is cut and dried, as far as most people are concerned, save a few fringe loonies on the far right. Or are you simply peddling us this 'left-wing dominance' baloney!!!??
Marek   
19 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Seanus,

Simply that while the European Shoah against, above all the Jews, was unparalleled in its systematic cruelty, such urges are hardly uniquely German.
Look at Poland, why don't you! The Kielce Pogroms occurred against Polish-Jewish citizens returning home to their villages AFTER the end of the War. They were massacred in the streets, practically.

Such atrocities never happened in Germany or even in Austria!
Marek   
19 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

I will freely admit to you that Germany, for that matter any European nation, is not the kind of 'Schmelztiegel' (melting pot) the US has become. Nonetheless, as Germany's past is particularly fraught with the pitfalls of mad plunges into racist savagery, she must be ever vigilant against this kind of xenophobia (Fremdenhass). We too are scarcely strangers to this sort of racism, though perhaps hardly as extreme in its manifestations (Hassausschreitungen).

Be mindful especially of the dangers in 'historical relativism' (Revisionismus). The Shoah was unique, albeit the potential for such Holocausts lies within all of us.

PS
'Advice' has no plural form in English. (he-he!) -:)-:) LOL
Marek   
19 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Thanks, Bratwurst Boy!! -:)-:) LOL ......for nothing. Or I should add... 'Thanks for the flowers! (Danke fuer die Blumen!)

Of course I understand the kind of rot expressed in the prejudiced newspaper media!! 'Terror auf der Strassse...' but 'terror from whom'?? From the Skinhead sorts such as the type you seem to side with or from the reluctant bi-products (inner-city Turkish-Germans living as US blacks must have lived during the 70's here at home!) of a multi-cultural experiment gone bad? I agree. It's hard to live in a salad bowl.....but sometimes that's what's on the menu ..and if you don't eat it, (not necessarily like it..) you'll starve.

Just some advice!
Marek   
19 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

You may not believe in Judgement Day (Das Juengste Gericht), but one day, your intolerance will be your undoing (deine Intoleranz wird ja Folgen haben).

There's a theory that Nazism took root in Germany so easily, because Germany didn't have a solid grounding in the Judeo-Christian Ethic. Read Prof. Helmut Plessner's 'Die verspaetete Nation"' sometime.

Good Luck!
Marek   
19 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Quite sure you understand the meaning of 'bigotted', Bratwurst Boy?? -:) LOL = mit vorgefassten Meinungen, voller Vorurteile usw.

Indeed sir, your opinions are QUITE bigotted!!!
But then, 'To Each His Own.' (Jedem das Seine und Dir das Meiste)
Marek   
19 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

'..hopefully, I can express my distaste......'

Na, hoffentlich nicht! Hopefully, you'll learn the errors in your extremely bigoted (kleinkarriert) thinking and express more enlightened views, in whatever language you happen to be using!! -:) LOL
Marek   
18 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

'You got my point, didn't you?'....

Well Bratwurst Boy, I got the rough idea of what I think you wanted to put across, that is to say, in 'Basic English'. However, it may be 'fine' for you to continue posting on an international open forum in a language not your own, as millions of other Europeans do each day, but it can gently impede smooth and complete communication of the nuances in meaning which are usually failed to be expressed.

On that pleasant and peaceful note.... keep on practicing your English on our forums: Uebung macht den Meister!
Marek   
17 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Bratwurst Boy,

Regrettably we may not post in languages other than English in this forum, as I feel that you are at a serious disadvantage not being able to express your thoughts more cogently and convincingly in German. This though is frequently the case with many Europeans, particularly the younger set, who arrogantly believe their English level higher than it actually is. Might that be your case?

Examples. You were blissfully unaware of the difference between the words 'mead' (ein alchoholisches Getraenk waehrend des Mittelalters in England, das aus Hafergruetzen und Honig bestand) and 'meat'. Your grammar errors and almost compulsive explitives ('crap') etc. are a further indication of this.

You only make yourself look bad. Should you wish to continue this discussion thread more calmly in your native tongue and as the educated citizen I hope you are, my private e-mail is panlech31@yahoo Be advised though, I have a spam firewall and am not afraid to use it!!!
Marek   
17 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Mr. Cem Ozdemir, a German-born Turk, was a long-time representative (Abgeordneter) of your Parliament (Bundestag)! He seemed reasonably popular!

Back to the Turkey question. To be sure, Turkey's upcoming membership in the European Union may become a matter of both economic as well as sheer demographic necessity. As is already well known, Germany's birthrate has been on the decline for years! Your own Guenter Grass documented this fact in his bleakly humorous (galgenhumoristisch) "Die Deutschen sterben aus"!

Indeed, Turkey's advantages may well be a strong, numerous, business-savvy and multi-lingual workforce, a far cry from the poor, illiterate 'Fremdarbeiter' of decades earlier!!

Europe might in the end need Turkey a great deal MORE than Turkey needs Europe.
Marek   
17 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Bratwurst,

ich bin Amerikaner deutsch-juedischer Abstammung, habe auch bis jetzt leider keinen Fuss in die Tuerkei gesetzt!

I'm a Yankee-'Cheese'-Doodle-Dandy and proud! -:)-:)!!!! LOL
Marek   
17 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Perkovic,

I speak fluent Polish, not Croatian, I'm afraid. I realize my words might be getting 'lost in the translation', but I only wish to add that we in the US, while faced with similar hostilities towards Mexican day laborers, view the entire immgration issue as fundamentally economically, rather than ethnically, motivated!

If one sees, for instance, Puerto Ricans in our neighborhoods, we don't object to them, so long as they are middle-class citizens and are respectful of a different cultural background from ours.

In the same way, if millions of badly-behaved, beer-swilling gringos from Podunk, Iowa USA began storming the gates of Mexico, well then, WASPS would be equally demonized.

Remember, it's never the mere ethnicity, but the breeding!!
Marek   
17 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

"And this point about Turks, not Egypts..."

Du, in Englisch heissst es 'Egyptians'!! Du hast hier, glaube ich, aus dem Deutschen 'Aegypter' uebersetzt!

I believe you may have been translating from your native German here. -:)-:)
Marek   
16 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

German anti-Turkish stereotypes notwithstanding, the Turks are of course considered the 'fertile crescent' (der Entstehungsort der abendlaendischen Kultur), indeed grouped as part of the great Empire builders of old!

Vor geraumer Zeit sei der Koenigliche Hof Konstantinoples einer der prunkhaftesten des Abendlandes. In days of old the Royal Court at Constantinople (later Istanbul) was said to be the most resplendent in all of Christendom. It is understood though, that Turkey was and remains a Muslim nation!! By 'Christendom', I actually meant 'the known world at that time'. Apologies for not being more precise! -:) LOL

As far as not knowing that the 'scharfe s' is still not used in Switzerland, you have but merely to crack open any book printed or published in Switzerland to see that this ligature is simply NOT used!

By the by, Bratwurst Boy, 'eating mead' is not a misspelling of 'meat'!!! Here, your English fails you momentarily. 'Mead' is the Old English word for the sort of gruel (porridge = Hafergruetze) people in England around the time of King John I used to eat, not 'meat' (Fleisch)
Marek   
16 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

'dass' since the Spelling Reform, thank you!! In Switzerland, the 'sharp s' never existed.

Your English is rather passable. I was raised with German at home as well as English., so it'd better be excellent! What's your excuse?

Bartolome,

As I already posted, the 'esszet' never really existed in Switzerland, which therefore feels itself technically exempt from the rules of the German Spelling Reform (deutsche Rechtschreibereform), officially observed in Germany as well as Austria!

Incidentally, my remarks conerning Turkish 'superiority' were meant to include the ancients as a group, along with the Romans, Greeks, Chaldeans (the first astronomers and mathematicians!) and Egyptians.
Marek   
16 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Bratwurst, is German your mother tongue?? Only one misspelling in my post ('das' instead of correct 'dass'!!-:) ), my sources indicate that civilization moved historcially in Europe from South on up North, rather than vice-versa. When the Turks were at the height of their Empire, you Northern Europeans were sitting around eating mead and throwing bones at one another!
Marek   
16 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

Hallo, Bratbursche!

Obwohl es stimmt, das 'kawa' keinen tuerkischen Ursprung hat, ist es wahr, dass die Tuerken den Europaeischen Hofadligen einen hoeheren Lebensstil verliehen hatten.

The Turks indeed endowed the European nobility with a higher standard of living!
Marek   
16 May 2008
History / What do Poles think about Turks? [761]

The Osman Empire and the Austro-Polish connection date back a ways, since the 17th century ay least, and so many of the daily amenities which Europeans simply take for granted, owe their existence in large part to Turkish culture, e.g. 'kawa' (coffee) which, of course, is of Turkish origin and a staple of almost everyone's day!

Even the very ritual of dining while seated or also reclining for pleasure is of Turkish origin, albeit the non-urban dwellers up until this day, may well eat seated on the floor rather than on chairs as is the Western tradition.

All of the above may already be common knowledge, yet given the nature of this topic post, I felt somehow that it bears repeating. -:)
Marek   
15 May 2008
Polonia / Polish workers in Denmark [41]

Hi there, Agata!

Allow me just a corrective "recast" of your English sentences:

'Where do you both who have Polish roots live in Denmark? I'm Polish but live in Scotland and will soon be moving to Ringsted in Denmark. If you need some Polish lessons, just give me a holler by e-mail.....'

Thanks, the help is appreciated. Where in Poland are you from? I'm from the States, but I lived for a summer in Denmark (I know Ringsted, in fact, there's a somewhat vulgar Danish pun connected with that city!!) and know Danish even more fluently than Polish, along with a few other languages. In Poland, I've only visited Szczecin.

Hope to hear from you again soon. (..and please don't think me rude that I offered to correct your English. -:) :) )
Marek   
14 May 2008
Language / Use of A/An/The ...... Articles [186]

But where Polish, like other Slavic languages, has neither a definite nor indefinite article even roughly equivalent to 'a'/'an'/'the' in English, Polish does have 'to', 'ta' (feminine) and 'ten' (masculine) translating to 'this' or sometimes 'that'. Example: 'Kto jest TEN pan?' =Who is this gentleman? or 'TO było przyjemny pobyt!' = This has been a lovely stay! etc.
Marek   
13 May 2008
Language / Idiomatic Polish [65]

Krzysztof,

You're right, of course! I thought I'd misquoted, but I wasn't sure. I meant more idiomatic expressions such as the type you've described.
Marek   
12 May 2008
Language / Idiomatic Polish [65]

Spity jak bela = drunk as a skunk

Taki kram, taki sam! = As the master, so his servant.
Marek   
21 Apr 2008
Language / The Polish language - it's bloody hard! [210]

'German language has a specific word for everything....'

Polish has more specificity, that's true, but there are exceptions, e.g. "ćma" = shadow, death's head moth, skull and cross bones etc..

Although Bubba Woo's example of "Ausfahrt" (exit) vs. "ausfahrt" (to break wind) is plain wrong! Our good 'ol Anglo-Saxon word "fart" comes from German "furzen", no connection at all to "ausfahrt", anyway, a conjugated verb form, rather than a noun.

Trust though the latter was intended as a "double entendre"! -:) -:)

I misswrote my last post! What I meant was that, in fact, Polish is LESS specific than German!! -:) sorry, guys.
Marek   
20 Apr 2008
Language / The Polish language - it's bloody hard! [210]

Southern,
Ennt ze tschairm'nss ssink zey shpeek maatsch better in Inglisch zenn zey duu!

Poles seem far less arrogant to me regarding the level of English they speak than do most German or Dutch speakers. Listen carefully, especially to a very young Dutchman, speaking English, and one'd think one were hearing a bad version of a grade B film noir: lots of misused slang, slurred speech and vulgarity.

Guest, I 'd say that both German and Polish are equally difficult in somewhat different ways. German has article declensions along with the adjective endings, which Polish doesn't have (nor does Russian!), but Polish has a seemingly chaotic counting system, almost quixotic in its capriciousness after the number '5'. On the other hand, German counting is as boringly regular and predictable as English, yet the separable vs. inseparable verbal prefixes in German drive most foreign students of mine up a bloody wall!!

In the end, I'd say that it's tough to generalize about each language's respective difficulties. One thing's for sure, though; their respective beauty is undeniable.
Marek   
10 Apr 2008
Language / Learning Polish, good for beginners? [29]

Hi,

I used a book 'Wśród Polaków' (Wydawnictwo Fundacji Kośćióskiej - 1992) eons ago and found it incredibly helpful. My version had NO English and even the cassettes were all in Polish!

Not even sure if it's still in print, but it's worth a try googling.

Powodzenia,
Marek   
3 Apr 2008
Polonia / Ever been to Sweden? [185]

No, Dan.

I mean that precisely because Sweden has for centuries been such a homogeneous and closed society, it naturally respects long-established mores (seder) and sees most deviation therefrom as mildly threatening, that's all.

Don't be offended! After all, who loved the Swedes more, while criticizing them more savagely, than their greatest modern muse, Ingmar Bergman??
Marek   
3 Apr 2008
Polonia / Ever been to Sweden? [185]

Krysia!

Me again. A favorite saying of mine sums up the sometimes annoyingly homogeneous character of the Swedes, moreso certainly than the Poles, and even other related Scandinavian neighbors of the Swedes, i.e. the Danes and the Norwegians:

"Because I get dressed at a certain time each morning, means everyone else in the world is putting on their pants!"
Marek   
3 Apr 2008
Polonia / Ever been to Sweden? [185]

Kryśiu!

Sorry you 'missed' my message to you yesterday in Polish (our administrators must have deleted it, surprise, surprise -:) LOL ). As far as the Swedes being "cool", perhaps this peceived open mindedness revolves around the stereotype of them as being somehow more sexually liberated than those in Roman Catholic societies, such as Poland or Spain. France though, at least nominally Catholic, would seem the exception to the rule.

I too found and find the Swedes quite open on matters of personal freedom, yet very proscriptive on matters of social behavior, as compared say to the Americans. Swedes definitely don't tolerate unsocial behavior, even among strangers, and speak their minds far more bluntly than the average US-citizen!