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Posts by Kiltmaker  

Joined: 22 Jan 2009 / Male ♂
Last Post: 3 Mar 2011
Threads: Total: 3 / Live: 2 / Archived: 1
Posts: Total: 20 / Live: 16 / Archived: 4

Displayed posts: 18
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Kiltmaker   
14 Oct 2009
Work / Does it make sense to move from the UK to Wroclaw for this salary? [50]

Hi there.

I'm an experienced IT professional currently working in the UK.
Recently, I've been offered a job in a "famous global corporation" in Wroclaw with the compensation package of 4500 PLN Gross per month + standard benefits (insurance, etc) + relocation/visa assistance (I'm not an EU national and require a work permit for Poland).

Taking into account that my current salary (in British pounds) is much higher than offered in Poland, I have 2 questions:

- How much will I pocket per month (i.e. net salary after taxes)?
- What is 4500 PLN Gross for Wroclaw? (I earn more now, but prices in the UK are higher as well)

What do you think about this? Should I go for the "lower" salary?

Cheers.
Kiltmaker   
14 Oct 2009
Work / Does it make sense to move from the UK to Wroclaw for this salary? [50]

Guys/gals, thanks for your replies.

I have a good job as IT guy in an American Bank in the UK. Company paid for my relocation and a work permit some time ago. So situation here is quite stable (despite all these financial problems).

The reason for relocation is the personal one: I have a Polish partner + baby, and we think it might be a good idea to move to Poland to be closer to her parents. Jobs perspective for my partner is better in Poland too (she is an architect), as jobs market for architects in the UK has reduced dramatically.

The key factor for us is to get a good job in Poland for me. I do not speak Polish although will be able to speak it fluently within a year (not sure about writing though :)

So, no good job in Poland = no relocation. It is just this company who offered 4,5k zloty gross is considered to be "one of the best employers in the world", so there is a benefit to work for them as well. The question is, does it makes sense to start from the beginning with 4,5k zloty gross after Banking IT job in the UK...

It is always more difficult to choose when you have a choice!
Kiltmaker   
16 Oct 2009
Work / Does it make sense to move from the UK to Wroclaw for this salary? [50]

Interesting discussion here...

Type of work is a bit different:
- in the UK I'm an application developer in a bank.
- role in Poland is an overseas customer service in global IT company (I also speak another foreign language I'd be supporting customers with).

So it might be reasonable, that Polish firm doesn't want to pay for my IT/development skills despite they want you to be from IT background.

Even though, I'd expect double of what they offered taking into account my educational background (British University) and 7 years of experience in IT environment...

Dilemma :)
Kiltmaker   
16 Oct 2009
Work / Does it make sense to move from the UK to Wroclaw for this salary? [50]

The position in Poland does not require Polish language at all. They need English (official corporate language) + foreign language I know.

I understand that it is a career change (Banking IT -> IT Company Customer Support), and less technical skills are required in latter.

Maybe I'll need to wait for IBM :)
Kiltmaker   
20 Oct 2009
Work / Average salary in Poland for PhD in IT [40]

Yeah, and this Kiltmaker guy has not found job in Poland yet.
Still working in the UK and looking for a good job opportunity to relocate.
Kiltmaker   
21 Oct 2009
Work / Does it make sense to move from the UK to Wroclaw for this salary? [50]

Thanks, CJJ.

I'd consider any big city in Poland (Warsaw, Krakow, Wroclaw, Poznan, Gdansk, Lodz) for relocation.

But so far I got 2 job offer from there - 1 from Krakow (I rejected because of a really low salary), and 1 from Wroclaw (we are discussing now. Very good American company to work for + good benefits packagae, the question is the salary)...

In my CV I do not focus on "soft skills", rather than on work done and projects delivered.

And I'm fine to move from Application Development in a bank to Customer Service in IT company, the question is how I'll be compensated...
Kiltmaker   
24 Nov 2009
Work / Average salary in Poland for PhD in IT [40]

The Kiltmaker guy has British MSc in Management and IT.
And the Kiltmaker guy has just got an offer from Wroclaw to work for 7000 PLN Brutto as a Customer Service Rep for foreign customers for a global IT company.

But in general, he spent 11 months sending his CVs everywhere (directly to companies and via infopraca/pracuy.pl) just to get 2 offers - 1 in Krakow (too low salary, rejected), and another one in Wroclaw (above).

Both works are not very technical and do not require software development or IT infrastructure management skills at all. The main criteria for both jobs were: experience in international company, IT skills (basics), account management skills or consulting or sales, and knowledge of English + 1 another foreign language.
Kiltmaker   
23 Feb 2011
Law / A father (foreigner) of a Polish child. How to protect my/daughter's rights? [19]

Hi,

I was in realtionships with a Polish citizen and we've got a baby girl (born in Poland). Both mother and daughter live in Poland and are Polish nationals. I live in the UK and I am citizen of non-EU country (ex Soviet Union). I'm officially registered as a father in my daughter's birth certificate.

The mother of my child broke up with me last month and found a new man already. We still keep relationships, I speak to my daughter, and coming to visit her. My ex says that I will always be a father of our child, so can see her as much as I want. So, no issues at the moment.

I've been transferring money to my ex both when we were "together" and post break-up (for my daughter). Initially, when we were "together" it was cash (so no documneted proof), now (after break-up) I transfer money via PayPal (so there is some evidence, i.e. account statement). The current monthly amount is 1200 PLN. My ex is not happy with those money and wants more. Both hee and her new boyfriend are working and have income.

Saying that, we do not have any written agreement on my rights, responsibilities, or money.

My aim: I want to be a father to my daughter, I want to have contact with her, I want her to visit me on holidays, etc.

While everything is fine right now, it is all not defined and all depends on my ex's mood.

The situation is changing in the way that my ex would change her mind and might start using our daughter as an argument: she could deny me a right to visit her, she may demand more money, etc. I want to protect myself and my daughter in this situation.

What should be my actions now? I try to keep good relationships with my ex, but cannot satisfy her every financial need (and don't want to!). Is amount of money I'm sending reasonable? (One of my Polish friends pays 500 PLN for his daughter post-divorce).

Should I get any kind of written agreement (involving lawers)? What is she refuses to sign anything?

Should I try avoid the court? What decision could court issue in our case (custody and support)? Or maybe the court is best option for me as it will give me defined rights towards my daughter? Or how badly the Polish courts treat foreign fathers?

Please advise. I'm lost. Love my daughter and don't have problems right now. However, realistically expect some in future.

Thanks.
Kiltmaker   
24 Feb 2011
Law / A father (foreigner) of a Polish child. How to protect my/daughter's rights? [19]

Thanks for your answers!

The amount of 1200 PLN was agreed after break-up when I thought she was a "poor" single mother and I still tried to help her. Now she is moving in with her new boyfriend (they are to rent a flat together) and therefore will be living all 3 of them: my ex, her new man, and my daughter.

As the situation changed (she is not a single mother anymore and have a man to take care of her), I want to cut the monthly amount to 800 PLN. I think it is fair amount to support a small child in this situation (i.e. when my ex adds 800 PLN for a child, it will mean the child's costs are 1600 PLN, which is even higher than some average salaries in small towns). I'd rather not give my ex more money than 800 PLN to her account. If I want to help more, I will put extra money in a savings account for my daughter (so I'd know she will get it, rather than her mother spends it on her new boyfriend).

Do you think 800 PLN is reasonable in this case? I want to minimize the "regular/mandatory" payments to my ex, and keep an extra for my daughter by myself (in a savings account).

Does anyone have any forms/templates for such an formal agreement with ex?
Does it have to be signed with a lawyer or notary?

Does anyone have contacts of a good English-speaking lawyer (with the specialization in the subject / family law), who can talk me through my options and (maybe) help with the formal agreement? Preferably Krakow area, but any other town (incl. Warsaw) is OK as long as the lawyer is good (as I think there are more good lawyers in Warsaw than in any other Polsih city).

Thanks.

Hi,

Anyone could recommend a good lawyer (family/children law) in Poland to talk to?
Kiltmaker   
26 Feb 2011
Love / Polish girlfriends testing guys with "Are you Angry with me" texts [59]

Bravo, Southern.

My several years of personal experience and observations make me agree with the "week macho" point.
Poland is a matriarchal country, where women tend to dominate in relationships and guys tend to submit themselves.
That might be the partial reason for so many Polish guys 30+ to have a moustache (any psychologist would tell you that moustache is a symbol of a compensation for a lack of masculinity, i.e. men wearing moustache want to and try to look stronger, "like real man").

If you are a strong man (especially from another culture) and do not submit yourself in the relationships, there will be psychological fight between two alphas and it might end up in balance or not).

No offence to Polish guys on this forum, just a cultural observation of a close outsider.

The simple advice to the SMS guy: the less you love her the more she wants you. But don't forget to throw some candies in :)