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You Know that Poland Was "Polin" and "Polinyah"?


Nickidewbear 23 | 583
5 Aug 2012 #1
Poland, before 1939, was called "Polinyah" by Eastern European Jews. Poland, before 1939, was called "Polinyah" by Eastern European Jews. Polinyah meant "Here Lies God," it was the land of the most incredible Jewish community in the world. It housed hundereds of thousands of Jewish people thriving and living equally. But walking through the streets of Krakow, Lublin and Warsaw, and ghostly pacing through the death camps of Majdonik and Auschwitz, Polinyah should be translated into "Here Lies God's Ashes"....

All in all, I didn't leave Poland with hatred. In fact, when not focused on the destruction, I really like Poland. Especially Krakow, there was something about that city. I understand why so many Jews had settled there before. There was a lot of culture, including a 1,000 person pillow fight, which was quite a sight to see. But I can't say I wasn't happy to go back home.... I know that what Poland taught me the most was how to appreciate. How to appreciate life, Judaism, the stories, and above all: Israel.

Some Jewish historians say the Hebrew word for 'Poland' is pronounced as Polania or Polin in Hebrew.[/quote]
Same with my ancestors in Lipsk (which is why I'm, in a way--though I shouldn't be--baffled by some of the Anti Semites and other naysayers here)--we don't begrudge that we dealt in Polinyah during the Diaspora. We could have had the misfortune of being in Russia Proper, Belarus, Ukraine, Lithuania, Moldova, etc. (all of whose website domains I honestly try to avoid, by the way--I don't avoid .pl because Poland is generally good about Jewish and other human rights, and has been throughout history).
polishmama 3 | 279
5 Aug 2012 #2
Here, I presumed that it was that because Jews were so long, so many, and so able to coexist in Poland that they just called it the same as Poles do, just with a Hebrew spin on it, if you will, as any ethnic group does as a natural part of the human language progressing through time.

kosherdelight.com/PolandJewishHistory.shtml

So Polanie, Polska, isn't "land of the Poles (Polans, a tribe of people, the field-dwellers, if you will)"?

Anyhoo, I'm not sure what the point was, but it was a cool tidbit to share.

Then again...

jewishgen.org/infofiles/tombstones.html

"At the top of most Jewish tombstones is the abbreviation , which stands for po nikbar or po nitman, meaning "here lies". ..."

According to some sites, פולין this is Poland.

Then, there's the non-mention that some Jewish tombstones were marked with
כאן טמון ה '

Which means "Here lies in God", like "May he rest in God's arms" or other fun Christian tombstones markings.

One Polish tombstone marking, Peace to His Soul Pokoj Jego Duszy...

:)

Re, your comment about Anti-Semites, not touching that. Nope.
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
5 Aug 2012 #3
Re, your comment about Anti-Semites, not touching that. Nope.

She does seem rather fixated...one would say obsessed about the subject.

Mods - a suggestion - perhaps there can be a "Nickidewbear" thread where she keeps all her Jewish rubbish in one place?
jon357 63 | 15,595
5 Aug 2012 #4
The origin of the word Poland is obvious to anyone who either understands the Polish word 'pole' or as Polishmama says knows who the Polanians were. The name of the country, Polska, creatively translates as 'Land of the fields', a pleasant and accurate description.

She does seem rather fixated...one would say obsessed about the subject.

Mods - a suggestion - perhaps there can be a "Nickidewbear" thread where she keeps....,

I second that. Reading it all is like a bad acid trip.
OP Nickidewbear 23 | 583
5 Aug 2012 #5
So Polanie, Polska, isn't "land of the Poles (Polans, a tribe of people, the field-dwellers, if you will)"?

Not in Hebrew. Remember that it was taken as a good sign for "Polska" to translate into "Polinyah".
jon357 63 | 15,595
5 Aug 2012 #6
The same with the word British. Sounds like 'brit ish', meaning 'man of the covenant'.

A moderately interesting co-incidence, but nothing more.


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