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Heritage of partitions still present in Poland


Miloslaw 6 | 1,522    
4 May 2019  #61
What about you? . Any idea?

No.And I don't think there is a pattern.
Which is I why was suspicious of the intentions of your post.
Seems I may have been wrong to suspect you.
But I am an old cynic.... :-)
UberUser    
4 May 2019  #62
Can you imagine a Russian tsar`s or Bismarck`s faces on a bar of chocolate in Warsaw or Poznań? :):):)

Yes I can. Go to Lotus restaurant in Warsaw. or Lokus whatever its called.
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
4 May 2019  #63
Yes, the Days of Austria are held in Krakow in October and November. Theatre plays, lectures, exhibitions, concerts.
krakow.wyborcza.pl/krakow/7,44425,22549919,dni-austrii-w-krakowie-koncerty-wyklady-teatr.html

The Austro-Hungarian Emperor, Franz Joseph I, was liked in Galicia partition zone.

Decent partitioner. so called. Not without a reason.

Did you know that it was in the Austrian partition where Matejko, Kossak, Styka and other renowned artists painted their great patriotic pictures, e..g, , Rejtan, Racławice Panorama, 3rd May Constitution, Stańczyk,? That was out of question in two other partitions. Rejtan was even bought by Franz Joseph and displayed in his private gallery.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rac%C5%82awice_Panorama
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rejtan_(painting)
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_B%C3%A1thory_at_Pskov

but a simple intellectual laziness :

Yes, but why should we strive so much? After all, it is a long holiday weekend in Poland. We are relaxing here..... :):)

Go to Lotus restaurant in Warsaw.

Tell us more. We are lazy and don`t want to go there right now. :)
10iwonka10 - | 383    
4 May 2019  #64
Today you can still see his countenance in various places,

I suppose comedy 'CK Dezerterzy' helped to keep this 'image'.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,307    
4 May 2019  #65
Decent partitioner. so called. Not without a reason.

But all this, the 'good spirit of Austria' known in Galicia, came only long after 1772 when the province had been originally taken by Austria. In this beginning period, Galicia was very much exploited by the new masters, to the extent that it earned itself a new name: Królestwo Golicji i Głodomerii (Kingdom of the Naked and the Starving), a name being the rewording of the new official name given to the province by the Habsburgs: Królestwo Galicji i Lodomerii.
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
4 May 2019  #66
In this beginning period, Galicia was very much exploited by the new masters,

Yes, that poverty was proverbial. About 50.000 peasants starved to death each year. But you know, people love creating myths about the past, they tend to forget bad things if combined with good ones. Hence, Decent Partitioner.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,644    
8 May 2019  #67
You can see it with the people that think that the PRL was better than now, because "people had jobs", "people had apartments" and so on.
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
8 May 2019  #68
Yes, also people were nicer to each other, there was no such corruption or cheating, sausage was real etc etc. We should start a new thread about myths of communism.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,644    
8 May 2019  #69
That's actually a great idea. The sausage one in particular reminds me of a discussion where someone claimed that there were no problems with getting meat in the PRL, as her family always had access to an abundant amount of meat. On further questioning, she was from a village and had no real idea what city life was like in the PRL.
10iwonka10 - | 383    
8 May 2019  #70
corruption or cheating,

I think PRL mentality was - I work in state Company it belongs to no one so if I can bring something home it is perfectly fine and I am clever' chap'.

I rememebr our neighbour who worked in Pani Walewska factory in Krakow. He seemed to have always lots of these perfumes.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,644    
8 May 2019  #71
Yeah, I know someone who started a company in the dying days of the PRL, and he says that theft was a serious, serious problem. He explained to people that they were stealing out of their own paypackets, but people simply couldn't understand that their salaries depended on the success of the business.
mafketis 17 | 6,755    
8 May 2019  #72
that's what shock therapy was for... most people eventually caught on, but the beton never did... guess which party they vote for?
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
8 May 2019  #73
Guys, I started a new thread about communism. avoid off topic posts here.

The vocabulary borrowings from the partitioners` languages are an important part of Polish heritage today.

Poznań region adopted many words from German.

E..g, bana - train - from German Bahn. (der, die or das? I never remember)

More here:

regionwielkopolska.pl/kultura-ludowa/gwara/podreczny-slownik-gwary-poznanskiej.html

brecha - łom
bryle - okulary
ganc - zupełnie, całkiem


etc
Miloslaw 6 | 1,522    
8 May 2019  #74
I think PRL mentality was - I work in state Company it belongs to no one

Or worse still, it belongs to me.
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
11 May 2019  #75
Another example
The private ownership of forests - all ex partition zones display higher amount of private owners compared to white colour - up to 10% ownership - in ex German lands. I hope you know why.



OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
14 May 2019  #76
Yes I can. Go to Lotus restaurant in Warsaw. or Lokus whatever its called.

Neither Lotus or Lokus, it is LOTOS. But they haven`t got tsar portrait in it because its decor resembles the 1970s communist times. You probably saw Lenin and mistook it for tsar. :)

Lookie here, a true partitioner countenance in the Polish street:



jon357 64 | 14,382    
17 May 2019  #77
LOTOS. But they haven`t got tsar portrait in it because its decor resembles the 1970s communist times

A classic restaurant, still good, still there. The cheaper one round the corner (with the same kitchen) is pretty good too.
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
18 May 2019  #78
I have just read an interesting article about Warsaw during tsarist times. A Warsaw historian generally tends to view that period as a lost chance of Warsaw. One thing which might be useful in this thread and is mentioned in the article is corruption that Russians introduced in their partition zone on a large scale and which still haunts Poles today. Such corruption didn`t exist in the Prussian zone, Germans mostly respected law.

dzieje.pl/aktualnosci/majewski-jedyne-dobre-rzeczy-ktore-zostaly-po-zaborze-rosyjskim-samowar-i-herbata
Ziemowit 12 | 3,307    
18 May 2019  #79
a true partitioner countenance in the Polish street

I think Franz Joseph of Austria is the only one enjoying such an esteem. In Białowieża there is a huge portrait on display of Nikolai II of Russia, but it is inside a restaurant (the Restauracja Carska) and in their smaller room.

What is really interesting about your pictture, Pawian, is the contrast between the venerable countenance of the keiser and the rather gross name of the pub!
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
18 May 2019  #80
In Białowieża there is a huge portrait on display of Nikolai II of Russia, but it is inside a restaurant (the Restauracja Carska)

Wow, so there is at least one Tsar portrait in a public place in Poland! And I didn`t believe it before. Now, we only need Bismarck portrait somewhere. Anybody? :)

the rather gross name of the pub!

Why gross? Pipa is perfectly neutral. :)





Ziemowit 12 | 3,307    
18 May 2019  #81
Now, we only need Bismarck portrait somewhere. Anybody? :)

I haven't heard of a portrait of Bismarck (except in a museum), but there is the fully equipped cabinet of Herr Hitler, leader of the 1000-Year Reich, in Poznań. In every detail it looks precisely like its original in Berlin, but the latter is long gone, while the former is still with us available to everyone who wants to see it.

Come and visit Poznań everyone!
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
18 May 2019  #82
We thoroughly visited Poznań in 2011 but that Hitler office wasn`t ready then, I suppose. However, Hitler doesn`t belong to partitions! Unless we assume that Ribentrop Molotov Pact of 1939 was the 4th partition of Poland. :)

Pipa or c... - who cares?

Hey, I would never think it could be used interchangably like you just did. Have we run into a perfect partition heritage linguistic difference? - it seems I come from the Austrian while you from Prussian partition. :)
Ziemowit 12 | 3,307    
18 May 2019  #83
From the Russian one. But the topic of linguistic heritage is interesting. Do you in Galicia use the expression "Paszoł/paszła won!" ?
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
18 May 2019  #84
It is known but not really popular recently. I used it myself and heard uttered in communist times, shortened to "won" :) But it could also be the influence of Vabank :):)
Ziemowit 12 | 3,307    
18 May 2019  #85
Other rusicisms frequently heard in Mazovia:
- 'pod rząd' instead of 'z kolei';
- 'co z tobą' instead of 'co ci jest'
- 'do roku 1837' instead of 'przed rokiem 1837'
- 'okrążyć' instead of 'otoczyć'
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
18 May 2019  #86
If you say so... :):) But I could use or have them used on me in both versions and see no difference. Co z tobą to będzie Szto z taboj ? :):)
Jaskier    
19 May 2019  #87
I'm from a different part of Poland and I heard and used both versions
kaprys 1 | 1,605    
19 May 2019  #88
I think that due to migrations of people certain phrases are used all over Poland.
OP pawian 150 | 7,961    
19 May 2019  #89
Guys, both Poles and not, in which partition would you like to live?
Succinct general description:
Prussian - best developed, high standard of life, and generally the rule of law, but also fierce Germanisation and Kulturkampf against the Church.
Russian - less developed but still not bad, a lot of industry, but fierce Russification and supression of any independent thought
Austrian - the least developed. unbelievable poverty, but a lot of freedom and no persecution of Polishness.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,644    
19 May 2019  #90
Probably the Prussian one. Germanisation would have gone out of fashion once a new generation had grown up solely in Germany, and Poles would have become a significant electoral bloc, similar to the role that they play today in Lithuania.


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